Resources for doctors and health consumers about genetic tests, clinical trials

Collecting buccal or cheek swab for genetic test

The following video will review proper techniques for collecting a buccal or cheek swab sample for processing in our laboratory in three easy steps. This will reduce the need for resample and is critical to yield good test results.

For general information about pharmacogenomics or drug-specific resources and clinical trials, visit the following websites:

Genetic tests description from Wiki

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetic_testing

Clinical trials registries by country

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clinical_trials_registry

The Value of DNA Sequencing

DNA sequencing: what it tells us about DNA changes in cancer, how looking across many tumors will help to identify meaningful changes and potential drug targets, and how genomics is changing the way we think about cancer.

The Link Between TCGA and Personalized Cancer Therapies

How cancers from the same anatomical site, such as breast cancer, are often genomically different. Knowing the genomic defect in an individual’s cancer can help doctors tailor treatment.

Cancer Genome ATLAS

https://cancergenome.nih.gov/

Talking Glossary of Genetic Terms

https://www.genome.gov/glossary/index.cfm?id=70

FDA Guidance on Pharmacogenetic Tests and Genetic Tests for Heritable Markers

http://www.fda.gov/downloads/MedicalDevices/DeviceRegulationandGuidance/GuidanceDocuments/ucm071075.pdf

A comprehensive list of FDA-approved drugs that have pharmacogenetic information in their labeling. This list includes the drugs relevant to PGxOne™ reporting.

http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/ScienceResearch/ResearchAreas/Pharmacogenetics/ucm083378.htm

https://clinicaltrials.gov/

ClinicalTrials.gov is a registry and results database for clinical studies involving human participants. The database contains studies conducted around the world, funded by both public and private sources. This is a good source of information for clinical trials investigating the pharmacogenetic effects for drugs in development and as well as for drugs already commercially available.

FDA-approved drugs with biomarker/pharmacogenetics

A comprehensive list of FDA-approved drugs that have pharmacogenetic information in their labeling. This list includes the drugs relevant to PGxOne™ reporting.

http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/ScienceResearch/ResearchAreas/Pharmacogenetics/ucm083378.htm

National Institute of Health (NIH): Personalized Medicine

ClinicalTrials.gov is a registry and results database for clinical studies involving human participants. The database contains studies conducted around the world, funded by both public and private sources. This is a good source of information for clinical trials investigating the pharmacogenetic effects for drugs in development and as well as for drugs already commercially available.

http://www.nih.gov/about/discovery/technology/personalmed.htm

National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)

NIGMS is one of the NIH institute and part of the US Department of Health and Human Services. The NIGMS supports basic research and training nationwide, leading to advances in disease diagnosis, treatment and prevention. Along with other NIH institutes, the NIGMS contributes support to the NIH Pharmacogenomics Research Network (PGRN).

http://www.nigms.nih.gov/Research/SpecificAreas/PGRN/Background/Pages/pgrn_faq.aspx

FDA Orange Book

The publication Approved Drug Products with Therapeutic Equivalence Evaluations (commonly known as the Orange Book).

A US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) database that provides timely consumer information on generic drugs

http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/InformationOnDrugs/ucm129662.htm

http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/Cder/ob/default.cfm

American Society of Genes and Cell Therapy

http://www.asgct.org/general-public

Clinical Trials by Therapeutic Area

https://www.centerwatch.com/clinical-trials/listings/therapeutic-description.aspx

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