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Sequence your microbiome and get a personalized diet plan

Order your gut DNA sequence test from us as we work with the lab by sending us an email at motherhealth@gmail.com to get a free personalized diet plan.

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And work with a genetic counselor.

Your gut microbiome controls production of cytokine.

Gut microbiome is affected by diet and medication.

Sequence your gut bacteria 3 times, $199. Before and after and another 6m later to see the effect of diet, lifestyle and stress/other factors in the bacteria diversity in your gut.

Not all bacteria are hereditable.

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About Cytokine

Cytokines (cyto, from Greek “κύτταρο” kyttaro “cell” + kines, from Greek “κίνηση” kinisi “movement”) are a broad and loose category of small proteins (~5–20 kDa) that are important in cell signaling. Their release has an effect on the behavior of cells around them. It can be said that cytokines are involved in autocrine signalling, paracrine signalling and endocrine signalling as immunomodulating agents. Their definite distinction from hormones is still part of ongoing research. Cytokines include chemokines, interferons, interleukins, lymphokines, and tumour necrosis factorsbut generally not hormones or growth factors (despite some overlap in the terminology). Cytokines are produced by a broad range of cells, including immune cells like macrophages, B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes and mast cells, as well as endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and various stromal cells; a given cytokine may be produced by more than one type of cell.[1][2][3]

They act through receptors, and are especially important in the immune system; cytokines modulate the balance between humoral and cell-basedimmune responses, and they regulate the maturation, growth, and responsiveness of particular cell populations. Some cytokines enhance or inhibit the action of other cytokines in complex ways.[3]

They are different from hormones, which are also important cell signaling molecules, in that hormones circulate in less variable concentrations and hormones tend to be made by specific kinds of cells.

They are important in health and disease, specifically in host responses to infection, immune responses, inflammation, trauma, sepsis, cancer, and reproduction.


About PPI medication

Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are a group of drugs whose main action is a pronounced and long-lasting reduction of gastric acid production. Within the class of medications, there is no clear evidence that one agent works better than another.[1][2]

They are the most potent inhibitors of acid secretion available.[3] This group of drugs followed and largely superseded another group of medications with similar effects, but a different mode of action, called H2-receptor antagonists.