Caring for your thyroid gland

  • Hypothyroidism, or underactive thyroid, is a very common problem, and there are many reasons for this, including drinking chlorinated and fluoridated water, and eating brominated flour
  • Chlorine, fluoride, and bromine are all in the same family as iodine, and can displace iodine in your thyroid gland
  • Dr. Jonathan Wright, a pioneer in natural medicine, recommend that women take about 6 mg of iodine per day, and men about 3 mg per day to protect their thyroid and breast health
  • Another principal cause of hypothyroidism is related to elevated reverse T3 levels, which can become elevated in response to heavy metal toxicity. In such cases, successful treatment must include detoxification
  • Hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid) can be successfully and quickly reversed with a treatment protocol using Lugol’s iodine and lithium

Hypothyroidism is far more prevalent than once thought. Some experts believe that anywhere between 10 and 40 percent of Americans have suboptimal thyroid function. Thyroid hormones are used by every cell of your body to regulate metabolism and body weight by controlling the burning of fat for energy and heat. They’re also required for optimal brain function and development in children. If you feel sluggish and tired, have difficulty losing weight, have dry skin, hair loss, constipation, cold sensitivity, and/or lack of sweating, these could be signs of hypothyroidism.

Iodine is the key to a healthy thyroid, and if you’re not getting enough from your diet (in the form of seafood), you’d be well advised to consider taking a supplement, ideally a high-quality seaweed supplement (be sure to check its source to avoid potential radioactive contamination), or other iodine-containing whole food supplement.

Elimination of carbon-based toxins, such as herbicides and pesticides, can be promoted through sauna-induced sweating. The Hubbard Protocol takes it a step further, and involves the use of niacin, high-intensity exercises, and sauna on a regular basis to help mobilize and eliminate toxins. Unfortunately, sweating doesn’t readily eliminate toxic metals. For those, you need a more aggressive approach, such as chelation.

One option that can help minimize the loss of crucial microminerals is to use chelating suppositories. They will still pull out minerals from your system, but you don’t have to worry about it nullifying the nutritional value of the food you just ate, which is a concern anytime you take an oral chelating agent. One drawback is that it takes a bit longer. “I’ve seen some people who have to do rectal suppository stuff for a couple of years to get all their toxic metals out,” he says. “And yes, we check their normal minerals fairly routinely, every couple of months, just to make sure it’s not being overdone that way.”

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/06/15/hypothyroid-hyperthyroid-disease.aspx


Thyroid blood tests and more

Thyroid tests — but not the usual standard-issue tests.

Request:

  • TSH, free T3, free T4, and reverse T3
  •  Check those adrenals: Measure cortisol first thing in the morning, free and total testosterone, and DHEA.
  • Also get progesterone on day 21-23 (if you’re cycling), fasting insulin and glucose, IGF-1 (growth hormone) and glucose.

Email motherhealth@gmail.com to get this Thyroid blood panel test:

  • Thyroid Antibody Panel
  • Item Catalog Number: LC100004
This panel contains the following tests:

  • Thyroid antithyroglobulin antibody (ATA)
  • Thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO)

Thyroglobulin and thyroid peroxidase are proteins involved in the production of thyroid hormones. It is possible for antibodies from your own immune system to attack these proteins rendering them dysfunctional. Both are often used in conjunction with each other to assess thyroid function, follow treatment for thyroid disease and differentiate between autoimmune conditions of the thyroid.

Antibodies to either of these important thyroid proteins can result in symptoms of low thyroid such as fatigue, weight gain, dry skin and constipation. Conditions such as Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia often have these antibodies present.

Fasting is not required for this test. Take all medications as prescribed.

Author: connie dello buono

Health educator, author and enterpreneur motherhealth@gmail.com or conniedbuono@gmail.com ; cell 408-854-1883 Helping families in the bay area by providing compassionate and live-in caregivers for homebound bay area seniors. Blogs at www.clubalthea.com Developing a new site, www.avatarcare.net , for early cancer detection using genetics tests, telemedicine with electronic appointment scheduling with doctors, video chat with doctors, matching care providers with health consumers and a health concierge for all to reduce chronic care cost, find cancer cure and coordinate health care using predictive medicine and participatory.

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