Visceral fat, genes, heart disease and how the stomach talks to the brain

Who is prone to visceral fat?

The tendency to accumulate visceral fat is governed by genetic, ethnic, and gender differences. For example, people who inherit two copies (one from each parent) of a mutation in a gene involved in fat metabolism are more likely to have higher amounts of visceral fat than people with just one copy. Those without any copies of the gene mutation are less likely to develop heart disease — even if they become obese. Natives of India and South Asia have a higher-than-average propensity for abdominal obesity. And white men and black women tend to accumulate more visceral fat than black men and white women.

Fat and aging

With age, people tend to lose muscle tissue, especially the type of specialized muscle fibers that produce quick bursts of speed and power. Fat frequently accumulates within the remaining muscle tissue, causing your body fat percentage to increase even when your weight remains constant. This scenario is closely linked to bodywide inflammation and diabetes risk. It may also explain why your BMI measurement doesn’t provide a true reflection of your health risks.

Evidence suggests that waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio are better indicators of metabolic health than BMI. Even among people with the same BMI, those who have a large waist (defined as more than 40 inches for men and 35 inches for women) have a significantly higher risk. In addition, people who tend to carry their weight in their hips and thighs (a “pear” shape) have lower waist-to-hip ratios and are less prone to heart disease than people with abdominal obesity (an “apple” shape); see “Measuring your midsection.”

Measuring your midsection

To measure your waist accurately, exhale and wrap a measuring tape around your bare abdomen just above your navel (belly button). Don’t suck in your gut or pull the tape tight enough to squeeze the area.

To compute your waist-to-hip ratio, first measure your hips by putting the tape measure around the widest part of your buttocks. Keep the tape measure level. Then, divide your waist size by your hip size.

Measurements that signal high risk Waist (inches) Waist-to-hip ratio
Women 35 or more 0.9 or more
Men 40 or more 1.0 or more

What should you do about visceral fat?

People with abdominal obesity — even if they’re not overweight — can lessen their heart disease risk with regular exercise and healthy eating habits. “Reducing the total amount of fat in your body frees up storage space for fat particles in places that are associated with less metabolic risk,” says Dr. Mantzoros. That’s why losing as little as 7% of your total weight helps lower heart disease risk: the most dangerous visceral fat disappears first.

 

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Connie’s comments:
  1. Get adequate sleep at night
  2. Do strength training
  3. Use music – toning relaxation music for brain health
  4. Eat colored whole food and get quality supplements at:

http://www.clubalthea.pxproducts.com

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