guava car.JPGVitamin C (water soluble) and A (fat soluble) for vision and cancer fighting properties: both from colored fruits and veggies

Signs that you are low in Vitamin C and A is when your vision is weak and you get allergies and get tired or sick easily.

Eat Vit A (afternoon) together with good fatty foods and eat Vit C (morning) with water soluble foods. Vitamin C is important in the absorption of most minerals and nutrients in the body such as Calcium, magnesium, iron and others.

Ascorbic acid becomes widely distributed in body tissues with large concentrations found in the liver, leukocytes, platelets, glandular tissues, and the lens of the eye. In the plasma about 25% of the ascorbic acid is bound to proteins.   Ascorbic acid crosses the placenta; cord blood concentration are generally 2 to 4 times the concentration in maternal blood. Ascorbic acid is distributed into milk. In nursing mothers on a normal diet the milk contains 40 to 70 ug/mL of the vitamin.  Food Sources of Vitamin C ranked by mg of vitamin C per standard amount; also calories in the standard amount. (All provide ≥ 20% of RDA for adult men, which is 90 mg/day.)

Whole Food, Standard Amount Vitamin C (mg) Calories
Guava, raw, ½ cup 188 56
Red sweet pepper, raw, ½cup 142 20
Red sweet pepper, cooked, ½ cup   116 19
Kiwi fruit, 1 medium 70 46
Orange, raw, 1 medium 70 62
Orange juice, ¾ cup 61-93 79-84
Green pepper, sweet, raw, ½ cup 60   15
Green pepper, sweet, cooked, ½ cup 51   19
Grapefruit juice, ¾ cup 50-70 71-86
Vegetable juice cocktail, ¾ cup 50 34
Strawberries, raw, ½ cup 49 27
Brussels sprouts, cooked, ½ cup 48 28
Cantaloupe, ¼ medium 47 51
Papaya, raw, ¼ medium (strong enzyme) 47 30
Kohlrabi, cooked, ½ cup 45 24
Broccoli, raw, ½ cup 39 15
Edible pod peas, cooked, ½ cup 38 34
Broccoli, cooked, ½ cup 37 26
Sweet potato, canned, ½ cup 34   116
Tomato juice, ¾ cup 33 31
Cauliflower, cooked, ½ cup 28 17
Pineapple, raw, ½ cup 28 37
Kale, cooked, ½ cup 27 18
Mango, ½ cup 23 54

Vitamin A for growth and bone development

In humans, an exogenous source of vitamin A is required for growth (hormones and others) and bone development, vision, reproduction, and the integrity of mucosal and epithelial surfaces. In the retina, retinol is converted to the aldehyde, cis-retinal, which combines with opsin to form rhodopsin, and visual pigment. Vitamin A has been reported to act as a cofactor in various biochemical reactions including mucopolysaccharide synthesis, cholesterol synthesis, and hydroxysteroid metabolism.

Cholesterol synthesis happens during the night and so is Vitamin A. Women should especially sleep before 10pm to follow the normal body rhythm and hormone production. Cholesterol and Vitamin A are important in hormone production.

Vitamin A is essential for growth and bone development in children, for vision (particularly in dim light), and for integrity of mucosal and epithelial surfaces.

Vitamin A deficiency leads to xerophthalmia, Bitot’s spots, keratomalacia, night blindness (nyctalopia), hyperkeratosis of the skin, epithelial metaplasia of mucous membranes, and decreased resistance to infections. Administration of vitamin A completely reverses signs of vitamin deficiency unless keratomalacia has resulted in irreversible ocular damage.

Retinol inhibited the mutagenic activity of aflatoxin b1 when added to the Ames salmonella/mammalian microsome assay.

Concurrent use of vitamin E may facilitate absorption, hepatic storage, and utilization of vitamin A, and reduce toxicity; excessive doses may deplete vitamin A stores.

Concurrent use /of tetracycline/ with vitamin A 50,000 Units a day and higher has been reported to cause benign intracranial hypertension.

Vitamin A administration induces a high risk of intoxication in patients with chronic renal failure.

From epidemiological research it is argued that low vitamin A intake is associated with a higher incidence of cancer in different tissues.

Food Sources of Vitamin A ranked by micrograms Retinol Activity Equivalents (RAE) of vitamin A per standard amount; also calories in the standard amount. (All are ≥ 20% of RDA for adult men, which is 900 mg/day RAE.)

Food Sources

Whole Food, Standard Amount Vitamin A
(μg RAE)
Calories
Organ meats (liver, giblets), various, cooked, 3 oza 1490-9126 134-235
Carrot juice, ¾ cup 1692   71
Sweetpotato with peel, baked, 1 medium 1096 103
Pumpkin, canned, ½ cup (and yams are happy food) 953 42
Carrots, cooked from fresh, ½ cup 671 27
Spinach, cooked from frozen, ½ cup 573 30
Collards, cooked from frozen, ½ cup 489 31
Kale, cooked from frozen, ½ cup 478 20
Mixed vegetables, canned, ½ cup 474   40
Turnip greens, cooked from frozen, ½ cup 441 24
Instant cooked cereals, fortified, prepared, 1 packet 285-376 75-97
Various ready-to-eat cereals, with added vit. A, ~1 oz 180-376 100-117
Carrot, raw, 1 small 301 20
Beet greens, cooked, ½ cup (for hormonal balance) 276 19
Winter squash, cooked, ½ cup 268 38
Dandelion greens, cooked, ½ cup 260 18
Cantaloupe, raw, ¼ medium melon 233 46
Mustard greens, cooked, ½ cup 221 11
Pickled herring, 3 oz 219 222
Red sweet pepper, cooked, ½ cup 186 19
Chinese cabbage, cooked, ½ cup 180 10

Note: For those with thyroid problems, cooked your greens and most veggies.