Health – Washington Post

After Trump blames mental illness for mass shootings, health agencies ordered to hold all posts on issue

‘There is this climate of concern whether you can make a statement based on facts,’ said an employee at the National Institutes of Health.

  • Perspective

Children, tackle football and the possible dangers of brain diseases

Kids playing the sport can face the threat of concussions, cognitive troubles and behavioral problems.

  • Robert C. Cantu and Mark Hyman

More parents give dietary supplements to kids. But experts warn about their potential danger.

Physicians, others argue that just because such products are on store shelves doesn’t mean they’re safe for your children.

  • Erin Blakemore

More troubling signs that ultra-processed foods can hurt your health

Early deaths, cardiovascular disease may be linked to high consumption of such food, studies say.

He’s 26 years old but still sees a pediatrician: Why some young adults don’t move on

The doctors are seeing more 20-something patients because of convenience, health needs and parental insurance coverage to age 26. And that’s ok — mostly.

  • Caren Chesler

Families of gay kids were once seen as the enemy by support groups. That’s changing.

Today, there is a growing recognition that help from parents and other relatives is critical to the well-being of LGBT youth.

  • Marlene Cimons

‘I began feeling like I mattered’: How on-campus mental health counseling can make a big difference

Austin school district’s clinics quickly help youths struggling with depression, anxiety, other trauma-related issues.

  • David Leffler

The Big Number: How 48 minutes of extra sleep helped these teens

Later school start times found high schoolers and middle-schoolers less sleepy and generally more engaged in academics.

  • Linda Searing
  • Perspective

This allergist thinks some dirt and grime can be good for your kids

Experts think that we might be oversanitizing the environment for children, which could be leading to common health problems.

  • Cosby Stone

Naloxone, a drug that reverses overdoses, can save lives. Here’s why you should learn how to use it.

It’s a skill you may need, especially if you know someone who takes large doses of prescription opioids or abuses such drugs.

  • Erin Blakemore

Mystery lung illness linked to vaping. Health officials investigating nearly 100 possible cases.

State and federal health officials are investigating dozens of cases of mystery lung illnesses related to vaping in young people across the country. The states include California, Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota and Wisconsin.

FDA’s proposed new cigarette warnings are scary. That’s the point.

U.S. Food and Drug Administration has proposed graphic health warnings for cigarette packages to raise further awareness about smoking risks.

Planned Parenthood to exit federal program Aug. 19 over abortion ‘gag rule’ unless court rules in its favor

The women’s health clinic has said the changes are morally wrong and could potentially endanger the lives of its patients.

New antibiotic approved for drug-resistant tuberculosis

The drug was developed by a nonprofit group, in what some hope will become an alternative model since drug companies have largely abandoned the unprofitable work.

Agency did not conduct required oversight of program for those with disabilities

Health and Human Services did not conduct a single on-site visit of independent living programs, its inspector general found.

U.S. health panel recommends doctors screen all adults for illicit drug use

If finalized, the task force’s guidelines would make screening free or low-cost.

Abortion support remains steady despite growing partisan divide, survey finds

One of the largest-ever surveys on attitudes about abortion shows an increased partisan divide. But support for abortion remains steady, with no more than a quarter of residents in any state supporting a total ban.

A flight attendant who contracted measles has died amid a global rise in outbreaks

The flight attendant, who had reportedly received one of two immunizations, had been in a coma since April.

A revenge-seeking woman went viral by telling men she gave them HIV. Then police asked for a blood test.

How does a woman who describes herself as “nasty and evil” get revenge? A viral video telling men she gave them HIV.

Newark begins giving residents bottled water amid ongoing lead problems

“Newark is what keeps me up at night now,” says the pediatrician who helped expose the Flint water crisis.

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