My scientist friend asked how to detox or clean his body from toxins

Over the years, I have experienced family and friends dying of cancer. I observed their lifestyle and toxins they are exposed to. So to answer my friend’s question on how to detox and the mechanism of cleaning our body or getting rid of toxins, I listed some items for Dos and Donts.

Our lymphatic system which travels opposite our blood is responsible for cleaning our blood.  Search for lymphatic, massage and detox in this site http://www.clubalthea.com

When we clean the many bad foods or toxins that entered our body, we must clean our liver first, our laboratory.  It is closely linked to our heart that during our last breath, our liver is the first and last signal that our heart gets to shut down.

Detox or cleaning our cells from toxins is the key to living longer, the anti-aging process we all are seeking for. In my 50s, I could have died long time ago if I was born centuries ago with no clean water, fresh produce and raising a dozen children. Each child is minus 5 years of a woman’s age.

Detox is like cleaning the toilet. The following are detox tips and anti-aging tips to clean your cells:

Dos in cleansing your body from toxin, also detoxes your liver

  • Massage
  • Adequate sleep
  • Filtered water
  • Lemon
  • Baking soda (pinch in your drinking water)
  • Activated charcoal
  • Digestive enzymes from pineapple and papaya
  • Apple cider vinegar
  • Wash produce with salt or diluted vinegar
  • No over ripe fruits and left over foods or 3-day old rice ( aflatoxin , mycotoxin )
  • No charred BBQ
  • Whole foods ; sulfur rich as they are anti-inflammatory (ginger, garlic, turmeric, coconut, walnuts)
  • Deep breathing thru nose and blow out thru mouth
  • Prayer: May God’s light energy be with you and say Amen to accept it.
  • Resveratrol from Berries, kiwi, citrus fruit
  • Fasting
  • Activated charcoal
  • Clean air

Donts are ways that when practiced or consumed can kills our nerve cells and produce toxins in our cells.

  • Avoidance of too much caffeine, iron and sugar, these are food for cancer
  • Other metal toxins
  • TRANS fat
  • Processed
  • Plastics in food
  • Stress
  • Shift work: not sleeping from 10pm to 4 am
  • Radiation
  • Over medications, chemo, other carcinogens
  • Avoid exposure to fumes, chemicals (formaldehydes,carcinogens,toxins)

 

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Hi Connnie,

And what is your recipe for liver detox and the mechanism by which it works to accomplish that?

From: Male friend in his late 50s whose brother died of pancreatic cancer

Degenerative Joint Disease by Dr Axe

DJD 2DJDThe primary goals of all degenerative tissue disease/osteoarthritis or arthritis treatments are to lower inflammation/swelling, control pain, improve mobility and joint function, help maintain a healthy weight so you put less pressure on fragile joints, and to improve your mood — so you’re better able to handle the stress of battling a degenerative disease.

1. Stay Active

While most people with osteoarthritis usually have joint pain and some movement limitations, many find that they feel better and experience less symptoms overall when they keep moving. In fact, exercise is considered one of the most important treatments for degenerative joint disease. Like the old saying goes, “Move it or lose it.” In other words, the more you strengthen and stretch your body parts, the better intact they’ll stay into older age.

Exercise is important for lowering inflammation, increasing flexibility, strengthening muscles (including the heart), boosting circulation and supporting a healthy body weight. It helps keep joints and bones strong and limber, improve heart health/cardiovascular fitness, extend the range of motion of joints, and move synovial fluid throughout the body better. Plus, let’s not forget about the mental benefits of exercise. Getting regular exercise is a powerful way to lower stress, improve your mood, control stress hormones like cortisol and help you sleep better.

Because every DJD patient is different in terms of physical abilities and pain level, the amount and form of exercise prescribed depends on each person’s specific condition and how stable the joints are. You want to ideally do a combination of three types of exercises for osteoarthritis: (5)

  • strengthening exercises targeted at improving strength in muscles that support effected joints — such as knee strengthening exercises
  • aerobic activities to improve blood pressure, circulation and inflammation
  • range-of-motion activities to keep joints flexible and help you become more comfortable with daily movements

Some of the most beneficial, and least painful, types of exercise include walking, swimming and water aerobics. If exercise is painful at first or you’re just beginning to become more active, your doctor and/or physical therapist can recommend specific types of exercise that would be safest and most helpful. Start slowly and find ways to sneak more fitness into your day while you build up resilience and strength.

2. Lower Inflammation and Support Cartilage with a Nutrient-Dense Diet

Research suggests that a poor diet increases inflammation and might increase enzymes that destroy collagen and other proteins important for maintaining healthy tissue. Cartilage is about 65 percent to 80 percent water, and the remainder is made up of three components: collagen, proteoglycans and chondrocytes.

Collagen is a type of fibrous protein that acts as the body’s natural “building blocks” for skin, tendons, bone and other connective tissues. Proteoglycans interweave with collagen to form mesh-like tissue that allows cartilage to absorb shocks and vibrations, while chondrocytes mostly produce cartilage and help it stay intact as we get older.

Some of the ways you can help the body hold on to precious cartilage and lower inflammation is to load up on all sorts of natural anti-inflammatory foods. These provide essential fatty acids, antioxidants, minerals and vitamins that support the immune system, lower pain, and help with healthy tissue and bone formation.

Focus your diet around these foods as much as possible:

  • fresh vegetables (all kinds): Aim for variety and a minimum of four to five servings per day
  • whole pieces of fruit (not juice): three to four servings per day is a good amount for most people
  • herbs, spices and teas: turmeric, ginger, basil, oregano, thyme, etc., plus green tea and organic coffee in moderation
  • probiotic foods: yogurt, kombucha, kvass, kefir or cultured veggies
  • wild-caught fish, cage-free eggs and grass-fed/pasture-raised meat: higher in omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D than farm-raised varieties and great sources of protein, healthy fats, and essential nutrients like zinc, selenium and B vitamins. Vitamin D has been shown to help support arthritis patients, so consider adding in more raw dairy if possible too. (6)
  • healthy fats: grass-fed butter, coconut oil, extra virgin olive oil, nuts/seeds
  • ancient grains and legumes/beans: best when sprouted and 100 percent unrefined/whole
  • Bone broth: contains collagen and helps maintain healthy joints

Limit or eliminate these foods that promote inflammation:

  • Refined vegetable oils (like canola, corn and soybean oils, which are high in pro-inflammatory omega-6 fatty acids)
  • Pasteurized dairy products (common allergens) and conventional meat, poultry and eggs, which contain added hormones, antibiotics and omega-6s that contribute to inflammation
  • Refined carbohydrates and processed grain products and added sugars (found in the majority of packaged snacks, breads, condiments, canned items, cereals, etc.)
  • Trans fats/hydrogenated fats (used in packaged/processed products and often to fry foods)

 

Degenerative joint disease stats - Dr. Axe

 

3. Maintain a Healthy Body Weight

Carrying excess body weight puts strain on joints that are already delicate. (7) Osteoarthritis patients who are overweight should try to reach a healthy body weight in a realistic way, using a well-balanced diet and adding in more movement. This should be viewed as a long-term lifestyle change, not a quick-fix diet that’s very low in calories and will likely result in nutrient deficiencies that are needed to limit further injuries.

4. Get Enough Rest/Relaxation

When you don’t get enough sleep, downtime and relaxation in your life, your joints and muscles have a harder time repairing themselves, while your stress hormones, body weight and inflammation all tend to rise. You need to get enough sleep every night (seven to nine hours usually) in order to relieve joints from stress, keep stress hormone levels balanced, regulate your appetite and repair damaged tissue. Learn to recognize your body’s signals, and know when to stop or slow down and take a break, so you avoid becoming anxious, overexerted and run-down.

5. Control Pain Naturally

Dealing with pain can be one of the hardest things about battling degenerative joint disease, since it takes away from your quality of life, ability to do your job well and independence. Many doctors prescribe anti-inflammatory medications (like NSAIDs) or even surgery to dull pain if the situation becomes bad enough, but you can also use non-drug pain-relief techniques that are just as effective. Some popular complementary and alternative therapies that help fight pain include:

  • Acupuncture: Studies show that patients receiving acupuncture normally have less pain than patients in placebo control groups. Acupuncture is proven to help lower symptoms of back and neck pain, muscle aches and joint stiffness, osteoarthritis, and chronic headaches. (8)
  • Massage therapy: A professional massage can help improve circulation, bring blood to sensitive areas, relax the mind and lower stress.
  • Reflexology: Reflexology has been used for hundreds of years to stimulate the nervous system and help the body handle stress, fatigue, pain and emotional problems.
  • Infrared sauna treatments: Both heat and cold (or both together, used at different times) can be useful for loosening up joints and muscles and lowering swelling or pain. (9) At home you can use warm towels, ice packs, hot packs or a hot shower to reduce pain. Also consider trying infrared saunas, which are a type of sauna that uses heat and light to help relax the body by creating heat and causing you to sweat and release stored toxins. They’ve been shown to lower pain and are believed to have a parasympathetic healing effect, which means they help the body handle stress better.

What Causes Osteoarthritis/DJD?

People with DJD don’t maintain enough healthy cartilage as they age, which means movement becomes more painful as bones rub closer to one another, instead of being blocked by the slippery substance that’s supposed to act as a buffer between the bones. We need cartilage to help bones “glide” and also to absorb vibrations or shocks we experience when we move around, which is why most people with degenerative joint disease find it hard to go about normal day-to-day activities.

When the disease progresses enough, bones rub together in a way that causes inflammation, swelling, pain, loss of mobility and sometimes changes to the shapes of joints.

Here’s a quick overview of how joints work. Joints are the point where two or more bones are connected, and they’re made up (in most cases) of the following parts: cartilage, joint capsule (tough membrane sacs that enclose all the bones), synovium (located inside the joint capsules and responsible for secreting lubricating synovial fluid) and synovial fluid (buffers and lubricates the joints and cartilage). (10)

In people who don’t suffer from DJD or other forms of joint damage (like rheumatoid arthritis), their joints are encased in smooth cartilage and lined with synovial fluid that helps with the “sliding” of cartilage against bones, bones against muscles and muscles against connective tissues.

In severe cases of degenerative joint disease, joints start to become smaller and also to change shape while small deposits of bone (osteophytes, which are sometimes also called bone spurs) can also form around the edges of the joints where they shouldn’t be. The main problem with bone spurs is that at any time they can break off from the cartilage they grow on and make their way into the space where the joints are, further causing pain and complications.


Connie’s comments: My 82 yr old mother has DJD and is taking the following: supplement with turmeric and ginger, omega 3 oils, Vitamin B complex and Vitamin C, exercise, destress, massage oil with ginger, coconut and other essential oils of rosemary, eucalypytus and tea tree and whole foods of greens and yellow colored foods.

Closed Loop System Could Detect and Heal Disease by Modulating Peripheral Nerve Activity

Integrated, international efforts under ElectRx program blend mapping of neural circuits and development of novel bio-electrical interfaces.

DARPA has selected seven teams of researchers to begin work on the Agency’s Electrical Prescriptions (ElectRx) program, which has as its goal the development of a closed-loop system that treats diseases by modulating the activity of peripheral nerves. The teams will initially pursue a diverse array of research and technological breakthroughs in support of the program’s technical goals. Ultimately, the program envisions a complete system that can be tested in human clinical trials aimed at conditions such as chronic pain, inflammatory disease, post-traumatic stress and other illnesses that may not be responsive to traditional treatments.

“The peripheral nervous system is the body’s information superhighway, communicating a vast array of sensory and motor signals that monitor our health status and effect changes in brain and organ functions to keep us healthy,“ said Doug Weber, the ElectRx program manager and a biomedical engineer who previously worked as a researcher for the Department of Veterans Affairs. “We envision technology that can detect the onset of disease and react automatically to restore health by stimulating peripheral nerves to modulate functions in the brain, spinal cord and internal organs.”

The oldest and simplest example of this concept is the cardiac pacemaker, which uses brief pulses of electricity to stimulate the heart to beat at a healthy rate. Extending this concept to other organs like the spleen may offer new opportunities for treating inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Fighting inflammation may also provide new treatments for depression, which growing evidence suggests might be caused in part by excess levels of inflammatory biomolecules. Peripheral nerve stimulation may also be used to regulate production of neurochemicals that regulate learning and memory in the brain, offering new treatments for post-traumatic stress and other mental health disorders.

“Through the combination of a growing understanding of how the nervous system regulates many aspects of our health and advancing technology to measure and stimulate nerve signals, I believe we’re poised to make fundamental changes to the way we diagnose and treat disease,” Weber said. “To that end, DARPA has assembled a performer team and outlined a research way-ahead that we anticipate can move us toward a capability to safely and reliably modulate the peripheral nervous system to fight disease.”

The main thrusts for Phase I of ElectRx are fundamental studies to map the neural circuits governing the physiology of diseases of interest to DARPA and preliminary development of novel, minimally invasive neural and bio-interface technologies with unprecedented levels of precision, targeting and scale. The teams include a mix of first-time and prior DARPA performers. Many have partnered with established medical device manufacturers to support trials in the near term and ultimately facilitate transition of ElectRx interface devices as they mature.

  • Circuit Therapeutics (Menlo Park, Calif.), a start-up co-founded by Karl Deisseroth and Scott Delp, is a new DARPA performer. The team plans to further develop its experimental optogenetic methods for treating neuropathic pain, building toward testing in animal models before seeking to move to clinical trials in humans.
  • A team at Columbia University (New York), led by Elisa Konofagou, will pursue fundamental science to support the use of non-invasive, targeted ultrasound for neuromodulation. The team aims to elucidate the underlying mechanisms that may make ultrasound an option for chronic intervention, including activation and inhibition of nerves.
  • A team at the Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health (Parkville, Australia), led by John Furness, is a first-time DARPA performer. Team members will seek to map the nerve pathways that underlie intestinal inflammation, with a focus on determining the correlations between animal models and human neural circuitry. They will also explore the use of neurostimulation technologies based on the cochlear implant —developed by Cochlear, Inc. to treat hearing loss, but adapted to modulate activity of the vagus nerve in response to biofeedback signals—as a possible treatment for inflammatory bowel disease.
  • A team at the Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore), led by Jiande Chen, aims to explore the root mechanisms of inflammatory bowel disease and the impact of sacral nerve stimulation on its progression. The team will apply a first-of-its-kind approach to visualize intestinal responses to neuromodulation in animal models.
  • A team at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Cambridge, Mass.), led by Polina Anikeeva, will aim to advance its established work in magnetic nanoparticles for localized, precision in vivo neuromodulation through thermal activation of neurons in animal models. The team’s work will target the adrenal gland and the splanchnic nerve circuits that govern its function. To increase specificity and minimize potential side effects of this method of stimulation, the team seeks to develop nanoparticles with the ability to bind to neuronal membranes. Dr. Anikeeva was previously a DARPA Young Faculty Awardee.
  • A team at Purdue University (West Lafayette, Ind.), led by Pedro Irazoqui, will leverage an existing collaboration with Cyberonics to study inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract and its responsiveness to vagal nerve stimulation through the neck. Validation of the mechanistic insights that emerge from the effort will take place in pre-clinical models in which novel neuromodulation devices will be applied to reduce inflammation in a feedback-controlled manner. Later stages of the effort could advance the design of clinical neuromodulation devices.
  • A team at the University of Texas, Dallas, led by Robert Rennaker and Michael Kilgard, will examine the use of vagal nerve stimulation to induce neural plasticity for the treatment of post-traumatic stress. As envisioned, stimulation could enhance learned behavioral responses that reduce fear and anxiety when presented with traumatic cues. Dr. Rennaker is a U.S. Marine Corps veteran who served in Liberia, Kuwait and Yugoslavia.

Concept diagram of ElectRx technologies.

“Using the peripheral nervous system as a medium for delivering therapy is largely new territory and it’s rich with potential to manage many of the conditions that impact the readiness of our military and, more generally, the health of the nation,” Weber said. “It will be an exciting path forward.”

ABOUT THIS NEUROSCIENCE RESEARCH

Source: DARPA
Image Source: The image is credited to DARPA

Vagus Nerve Stimulation May Reduce Rheumatoid Arthritis Symptoms

vagusSummary: A new study reports vagus nerve stimulation reduces symptoms of RA, cytokine levels and inflammation.

Source: Northwell Health.

Clinical trial data published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) demonstrates stimulating the vagus nerve with an implantable bioelectronic device significantly improved measures of disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects 1.3 million people in the United States and costs tens of billions of dollars annually to treat. The findings, announced by the Academic Medical Center/University of Amsterdam, the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research and SetPoint Medical, appear online in PNAS Early Edition and will appear in an upcoming print issue.

The publication, titled “Vagus nerve stimulation inhibits cytokine production and attenuates disease severity in rheumatoid arthritis,” highlights a human study designed to reduce symptoms of RA, cytokine levels and inflammation by stimulating the vagus nerve with a small implanted device.

“This is the first study to evaluate whether stimulating the inflammatory reflex directly with an implanted electronic device can treat RA in humans,” said Professor Paul-Peter Tak, MD, PhD, FMedSci, the international principal investigator and lead author of the paper at the Division of Clinical Immunology & Rheumatology of the Academic Medical Center/University of Amsterdam. “We have previously shown that targeting the inflammatory reflex may reduce inflammation in animal models and in vitro models of RA. The direct correlation between vagus nerve stimulation and the suppression of several key cytokines like TNF as well as reduced RA signs and symptoms demonstrates proof of mechanism, which might be relevant for other immune-mediated inflammatory diseases as well.”

“Our findings suggest a new approach to fighting diseases with bioelectronic medicines, which use electrical pulses to treat diseases currently treated with potent and relatively expensive drugs,” said Anthony Arnold, Chief Executive Officer of SetPoint Medical. “These results support our ongoing development of bioelectronic medicines designed to improve the lives of people suffering from chronic inflammatory diseases and give healthcare providers new and potentially safer treatment alternatives at a much lower total cost for the healthcare system.”

“This is a real breakthrough in our ability to help people suffering from inflammatory diseases,” said co-author Kevin J. Tracey, MD, president and CEO of the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, discoverer of the inflammatory reflex and co-founder of SetPoint Medical. “While we’ve previously studied animal models of inflammation, until now we had no proof that electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve can indeed inhibit cytokine production and reduce disease severity in humans. I believe this study will change the way we see modern medicine, helping us understand that our nerves can, with a little help, make the drugs that we need to help our body heal itself.”

While focused on rheumatoid arthritis, the trial’s results may have implications for patients suffering from other inflammatory diseases, including Crohn’s, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and others.

Study Methodology and Results

In the study, a stimulation device was implanted on the vagus nerve during a surgical procedure, then activated and deactivated based on a set schedule to measure response over 84 days, with primary endpoints measured at day 42 using DAS28-CRP, a standard disease activity composite score for RA that includes counts of tender and swollen joints, patient’s and physician’s assessment of disease activity and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels.

Photo of hand of a person with RA.

Of 17 patients with active RA in the study, several patients that had failed to respond to multiple therapies, including biologicals with different mechanisms of action, demonstrated robust responses. The findings indicate that active electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve inhibits TNF production in RA patients and significantly attenuates RA disease severity.

Several patients reported significant improvements, including some who had previously failed to respond to any other form of pharmaceutical treatment. In addition, no serious adverse side effects were reported.

The emerging field of bioelectronic medicine aims to target disorders traditionally treated with drugs and instead uses advanced neuromodulation devices that may offer significant advantages. SetPoint is developing a novel proprietary bioelectronic medicine platform to treat a variety of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, using an implanted device to stimulate the vagus nerve.

ABOUT THIS NEUROLOGY RESEARCH ARTICLE

Source: Emily Ng – Northwell Health
Image Source: This NeuroscienceNews.com image is credited to James Heilman, MD and is licensed CC BY SA 3.0.
Original Research: The study will appear in PNAS.

CITE THIS NEUROSCIENCENEWS.COM ARTICLE
Northwell Health. “Vagus Nerve Stimulation May Reduce Rheumatoid Arthritis Symptoms.” NeuroscienceNews. NeuroscienceNews, 5 July 2016.
<http://neurosciencenews.com/ra-vagus-nerve-stimulation-4614/&gt;.

SW glitch in fMRI, brain scans faulty results

MRI SW glitch

A 90 yr old Alzheimer’s patient in a care home has rigid body and when moved by caregivers from her bed or wheel chair, they feel that she is a dead weight. She cannot move most of her limbs. Every day her daughter would massage her head and she still has appetite and loves to smile with open mouth and eyes whenever she sees me dancing in front of her.

There are many paths to healing. We can age like our mothers did or better if we know how to relax, get a massage, enjoy walks and dancing and more.

What if the fMRI scans has software glitch. We should always listen to our body, sleep and exercise more.

Supercharge our Lymphatics to cleanse our blood with dry brushing and massage

dry-brush-300x200

My grandma would massage my armpit and inner thighs but dry brushing works too.

Our lymphatic system is responsible for cleansing our circulatory system. It is located in our neck, legs, feet, arm pit and most of our body parts.

Jumping on a trampoline is suppose to bring about good circulation too and strengthening our lymphs.

Google dry brushing to cleanse your circulatory system.