Eating Fish May Reduce Multiple Sclerosis Risk

Eating Fish May Reduce Multiple Sclerosis Risk

Summary: A new study reveals eating fish regularly and taking daily fish oil supplements may reduce the risk of developing multiple sclerosis. Researchers report high fish intake is associated with a 45% reduced risk of developing MS.

Source: AAN.

Eating fish at least once a week or eating fish one to three times per month in addition to taking daily fish oil supplements may be associated with a reduced risk of multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 70th Annual Meeting in Los Angeles, April 21 to 27, 2018. These findings suggest that the omega-3 fatty acids found in fish may be associated with lowering the risk of developing MS.

Multiple sclerosis is a disease of the central nervous system that affects communication between the brain and other parts of the body. With MS, the body’s immune system attacks myelin, the fatty white substance that insulates and protects the nerves. This disrupts the signals between the brain and the rest of the body. Symptoms of MS may include fatigue, numbness, tingling or difficulty walking. The first episode of MS symptoms, lasting at least 24 hours, is known as clinically isolated syndrome. There is no cure for MS.

“Consuming fish that contain omega-3 fatty acids has been shown to have a variety of health benefits, so we wanted to see if this simple lifestyle modification, regularly eating fish and taking fish oil supplements, could reduce the risk of MS,” said study author Annette Langer-Gould, MD, PhD, of Kaiser Permanente Southern California in Pasadena, Calif., and a member of the American Academy of Neurology.

For this study, researchers examined the diets of 1,153 people with an average age of 36 from a variety of backgrounds, about half of whom had been diagnosed with MS or clinically isolated syndrome.

Participants were asked about how much fish they regularly ate. High fish intake was defined as either eating one serving of fish per week or eating one to three servings per month in addition to taking daily fish oil supplements. Low intake was defined as less than one serving of fish per month and no fish oil supplements. Examples of fish consumed by study participants include shrimp, salmon and tuna.

salmon

The study found that high fish intake was associated with a 45 percent reduced risk of MS or clinically isolated syndrome when compared with those who ate fish less than once a month and did not take fish oil supplements. A total of 180 of those with MS had high fish intake compared to 251 of the healthy controls.

The study also looked at 13 genetic variations in a human gene cluster that regulates fatty acid levels. Researchers found two of the 13 genetic variations examined were associated with a lower risk of MS, even after accounting for the higher fish intake. This may mean that some people may have a genetic advantage when it comes to regulating fatty acid levels.

While the study suggests that omega-3 fatty acids, and how they are processed by the body, may play an important role in reducing MS risk, Langer-Gould emphasizes that it simply shows an association and not cause and effect. More research is needed to confirm the findings and to examine how omega-3 fatty acids may affect inflammation, metabolism and nerve function.

Fish such as salmon, sardines, lake trout and albacore tuna are generally recommended as good sources of omega-3 fatty acids.

ABOUT THIS NEUROSCIENCE RESEARCH ARTICLE

Funding: The study was supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

Source: Renee Tessman – AAN
Publisher: Organized by NeuroscienceNews.com.

$64K per year Multiple sclerosis drug or a holistic healing option

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Dec 21, 2015  Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, neurodegenerative disease of the nerves in your brain and spinal column, caused by a demyelization process. In MS, your immune system mistakenly attacks the myelin, which is a protective coating around your nerve fibers. This leads to disruptions in the messages sent …
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Aug 1, 2009  Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a very serious illness, and I used to dread when people came to my office with MS because there really wasn’t much I could do for them. Since that time, and in researching a vast array of natural health therapies, I realized there are a number of different strategies available, some of …
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Mar 25, 2017  The Healing of Heather Garden documentary recounts the success a young woman had in curing herself from multiple sclerosisthrough diet and lifestyle changes.
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Jan 13, 2009  This inexpensive drug, normally used for narcotic overdoses, could spell relief for millions when taken in low doses.
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Feb 26, 2008  This simple, no-cost choice may dramatically reduce your risk of multiple sclerosis.
Feb 9, 2012  Health agencies from multiple countries, including the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency, are investigating reports of 11 deaths in multiple sclerosis patients who took the drug Gilenya: the deaths were due to sudden death, heart attack or fatal disruption of heart …

$86000 per year MS drug or go natural from whole foods to supplements

Multiple sclerosis

For 23 years, Diane Whitcraft injected herself every other day with Betaseron, a drug that helps prevent flare-ups from multiple sclerosis. The drug worked well, drastically reducing Whitcraft’s trips to the hospital. But as her 65th birthday approached last September, she made a scary decision: to halt the medication altogether.

With health insurance through her job, Whitcraft had paid a $50 or $100 monthly co-pay for the drug; she hadn’t even realized that the price of Betaseron had soared to more than $86,000 a year. Shopping around for drug coverage through Medicare, the out-of-pocket costs were mind-boggling: close to $7,000 annually.

“I was just feeling really bad that my disease was going to affect our retirement budget,” Whitcraft said. “You’re retired; you’re on a fixed income. And it just really was bothersome to me. I was doing this to us. This disease was doing this to us.”


By Dr Axe

Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that can develop at any age.

Multiple sclerosis (MS) affects women more than men.

The disorder is most commonly diagnosed between ages 20 and 40, but can be seen at any age.

MS affects 2.5 million people worldwide and around 400,000 people in the United States.

Multiple Sclerosis Causes

MS is caused by damage to the myelin sheath, the protective covering that surrounds nerve cells. When this nerve covering is damaged, nerve signals slow down or stop.

The nerve damage is caused by Inflammation which occurs when the body’s own immune cells attack the nervous system. This damage can happen anywhere in the brain or spinal cord.

Although no specific cause is known, some possible causes include: infections, mold toxicity, emotional stress, hormonal imbalances, toxic exposure, vitamin D deficiency, food allergies, and immunizations.

Multiple Sclerosis Symptoms

Multiple sclerosis symptoms can vary widely but the most common symptoms include:

  • Blurred or double vision
  • Trouble thinking
  • Lack of coordination
  • Loss of balance
  • Numbness
  • Tingling
  • Weakness in an arm or leg

For everyone, MS symptoms can display differently.

You may have a single symptom, and then go months or years without any others. A problem can also happen just one time, go away, and never return. For some people, the symptoms become worse within weeks or months.

The good news is there are natural treatments for multiple sclerosis that are effective and in many instances the condition can be reversed or greatly improved.

 

 

Foods for Multiple Sclerosis Diet 

In order to help recover from this disease, following a multiple sclerosis diet that is high in healthy fats and nutrients is key:

Unprocessed foods – Choose whole, organic, unprocessed foods as often as possible.

Coconut Oil – Coconut oil contains large amounts of medium chain fatty acids (MCFA) that support the brain and nervous system.

Fresh fruits and vegetables – Aim for a variety of colors to provide antioxidants that can help prevent free radical damage.

Omega-3 fats – The EPA/DHA fats found in wild-caught fish can help reduce inflammation.

Cabbage and bean sprouts – Foods high in lecithin may help strengthen the nerves.

MS Diet Foods to Avoid

Processed foods – Reduce your exposure to chemicals and toxins by avoiding any foods that are processed.

Gluten – People with MS generally have a gluten-intolerance and gluten can make symptoms worse.

Potential food allergens – Allergens can make MS symptoms worse, avoid any foods you might be allergic to.

Sugar – Lowers the immune response and causes systemic inflammation and premature aging.

Alcohol – Increases inflammation and can create a toxic environment.

Top 5 Natural Treatments for Multiple Sclerosis 

#1 Fish Oil (2,000mg daily) can help reduce inflammation and promote better nerve functioning.

#2 High potency multi-vitamin Provides basic nutrients needed for immune function.

#3 Digestive enzymes (1-2 capsules with meals) May help with digestion and reduce autoimmune reactions to foods.

#4 Vitamin D3 (5000 IU daily) helps modulate the immune system and support brain and nervous system.

#5 Vitamin B12 (1000 mcg daily) helps with the formation of nerves.

Bonus Remedy Astaxanthin, a powerful carotenoid antioxidant found in wild caught salmon can support the brain and nervous system.  Take 2 mg 1-2x daily.

Essential Oils for Multiple Sclerosis 

Essential oils of frankincense and helichrysum support the neurological system.  Take 2 drops of frankincense internally 3x a day 3 weeks, then take 1 week off and repeat that cycle.

Rub 2 drops of helichrysum to temples and neck 2x daily. Also, basil oil and cypress oil can improve circulation and muscle tone and can help reduce MS symptoms.


From Connie:

Quality supplements, anti-inflammatory, try AGELOC and Likepak at:

http://www.clubalthea.pxproducts.com

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Changes Uncovered in Gut Bacteria of People with Multiple Sclerosis

Summary: A new study reveals changes in the gut microbiomes of untreated and treated multiple sclerosis patients.

Source: Bingham and Women’s Hospital.

Study finds alterations in the gut microbiomes of treated and untreated MS patients.

A connection between the bacteria living in the gut and immunological disorders such as multiple sclerosis have long been suspected, but for the first time, researchers have detected clear evidence of changes that tie the two together. Investigators from Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) have found that people with multiple sclerosis have different patterns of gut microorganisms than those of their healthy counterparts. In addition, patients receiving treatment for MS have different patterns than untreated patients. The new research supports recent studies linking immunological disorders to the gut microbiome and may have implications for pursuing new therapies for MS.

“Our findings raise the possibility that by affecting the gut microbiome, one could come up with treatments for MS – treatments that affect the microbiome, and, in turn, the immune response,” said Howard L. Weiner, MD, director of the Partners MS Center and co-director of the Ann Romney Center for Neurologic Disease at Brigham Women’s Hospital, . “There are a number of ways that the microbiome could play a role in MS and this opens up a whole new world of looking at the disease in a way that it’s never been looked at before.”

Weiner and colleagues conducted their investigations using data and samples from subjects who are part of the CLIMB (Comprehensive Longitudinal Investigation of Multiple Sclerosis) study at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. The team analyzed stool samples from 60 people with MS and 43 control subjects, performing gene sequencing to detect differences in the microbial communities of the subjects.

Samples from MS patients contained higher levels of certain bacterial species – including Methanobrevibacter and Akkermansia – and lower levels of others – such as Butyricimonas – when compared to healthy samples. Other studies have found that several of these microorganisms may drive inflammation or are associated with autoimmunity. Importantly, the team also found that microbial changes in the gut correlated with changes in the activity of genes that play a role in the immune system. The team also collected breath samples from subjects, finding that, as a result of increased levels of Methanobrevibacter, patients with MS had higher levels of methane in their breath samples.

Image shows a graph.

The researchers also investigated the gut microbe communities of untreated MS patients, finding that MS disease-modifying therapy appeared to normalize the gut microbiomes of MS patients. The researchers note that further study will be required to determine the exact role that these microbes may be playing in the progression of disease and whether or not modifying the microbiome may be helpful in treating MS. They plan to continue to explore the connection between the gut and the immune system in a larger group of patients and follow changes over time to better understand disease progression and interventions.

“This work provides a window into how the gut can affect the immune system which can then affect the brain,” said Weiner, who is also a professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School. “Characterizing the gut microbiome in those with MS may provide new opportunities to diagnose MS and point us toward new interventions to help prevent disease development in those who are at risk.”

ABOUT THIS MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS RESEARCH ARTICLE

Funding: Funding support for this work included grants from the NIH/NINDS, The National Multiple Sclerosis Society and from The Harvard Digestive Disease Center.

Source: Haley Bridger – Bingham and Women’s Hospital
Image Source: This NeuroscienceNews.com image is credited to Howard Weiner, Brigham and Women’s Hospital.
Original Research: Full open access research for “Alterations of the human gut microbiome in multiple sclerosis” by Sushrut Jangi, Roopali Gandhi, Laura M. Cox, Ning Li, Felipe von Glehn, Raymond Yan, Bonny Patel, Maria Antonietta Mazzola, Shirong Liu, Bonnie L. Glanz, Sandra Cook, Stephanie Tankou, Fiona Stuart, Kirsy Melo, Parham Nejad, Kathleen Smith, Begüm D. Topçuolu, James Holden, Pia Kivisäkk, Tanuja Chitnis, Philip L. De Jager, Francisco J. Quintana, Georg K. Gerber, Lynn Bry and Howard L. Weiner in Nature Communications. Published online June 28 2016 doi:10.1038/ncomms12015

CITE THIS NEUROSCIENCENEWS.COM ARTICLE
Bingham and Women’s Hospital. “Changes Uncovered in Gut Bacteria of People with Multiple Sclerosis.” NeuroscienceNews. NeuroscienceNews, 12 July 2016.
<http://neurosciencenews.com/ms-gut-microbiome-4663/&gt;.

Abstract

Alterations of the human gut microbiome in multiple sclerosis

The gut microbiome plays an important role in immune function and has been implicated in several autoimmune disorders. Here we use 16S rRNA sequencing to investigate the gut microbiome in subjects with multiple sclerosis (MS, n=60) and healthy controls (n=43). Microbiome alterations in MS include increases in Methanobrevibacter and Akkermansia and decreases in Butyricimonas, and correlate with variations in the expression of genes involved in dendritic cell maturation, interferon signalling and NF-kB signalling pathways in circulating T cells and monocytes. Patients on disease-modifying treatment show increased abundances of Prevotella and Sutterella, and decreased Sarcina, compared with untreated patients. MS patients of a second cohort show elevated breath methane compared with controls, consistent with our observation of increased gut Methanobrevibacter in MS in the first cohort. Further study is required to assess whether the observed alterations in the gut microbiome play a role in, or are a consequence of, MS pathogenesis.

“Alterations of the human gut microbiome in multiple sclerosis” by Sushrut Jangi, Roopali Gandhi, Laura M. Cox, Ning Li, Felipe von Glehn, Raymond Yan, Bonny Patel, Maria Antonietta Mazzola, Shirong Liu, Bonnie L. Glanz, Sandra Cook, Stephanie Tankou, Fiona Stuart, Kirsy Melo, Parham Nejad, Kathleen Smith, Begüm D. Topçuolu, James Holden, Pia Kivisäkk, Tanuja Chitnis, Philip L. De Jager, Francisco J. Quintana, Georg K. Gerber, Lynn Bry and Howard L. Weiner in Nature Communications. Published online June 28 2016 doi:10.1038/ncomms12015