Acidic carbonated soda, bone loss and early menopause, magnesium deficiency

Carbonated beverages can cause osteoporosis. … However, it should be noted that according to the Framingham Osteoporosis Study, colas, but no other carbonated beverages, were associated with significantly lower bone mass density in the hips of older women.

Phosphoric acid in soda can also impair your body’s ability to use other minerals, such as iron, zinc, and magnesiumPhosphoric acid is dangerous if you come into contact with it as a chemical substance. The toxic fumes can irritate your skin, eyes, and respiratory system.

Carbonated water gets its fizz from carbon dioxide. A chemical reaction in your mouth turns the CO2 into carbonic acid, not only giving the drink a tangy, zesty, refreshing bite, but also making it more acidic.

Most soft drinks contain caffeine, which is a nervous system stimulant that causes stress on the adrenal glands and the body, contributing to nervous stomach, anxiety, depression, high blood pressure and increased mineral loss from the body.

Even though Mg ( magnesium ) is by far the least abundant serum electrolyte, it is extremely important for the metabolism of Ca, K, P, Zn, Cu, Fe, Na, Pb, Cd, HCl, acetylcholine, and nitric oxide (NO), for many enzymes, for the intracellular homeostasis and for activation of thiamine and therefore, for a very wide gamut of crucial body functions.

Mg absorption and elimination depend on a very large number of variables, at least one of which often goes awry, leading to a Mg deficiency that can present with many signs and symptoms. Mg absorption requires plenty of Mg in the diet, Se, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and vitamins B6 and D. Furthermore, it is hindered by excess fat. On the other hand, Mg levels are decreased by excess ethanol, salt, phosphoric acid (sodas) and coffee intake, by profuse sweating, by intense, prolonged stress, by excessive menstruation and vaginal flux, by diuretics and other drugs and by certain parasites (pinworms). The very small probability that all the variables affecting Mg levels will behave favorably, results in a high probability of a gradually intensifying Mg deficiency. It is highly regrettable that the deficiency of such an inexpensive, low-toxicity nutrient result in diseases that cause incalculable suffering and expense throughout the world. The range of pathologies associated with Mg deficiency is staggering: hypertension (cardiovascular disease, kidney and liver damage, etc.), peroxynitrite damage (migraine, multiple sclerosis, glaucoma, Alzheimer’s disease, etc.), recurrent bacterial infection due to low levels of nitric oxide in the cavities (sinuses, vagina, middle ear, lungs, throat, etc.), fungal infections due to a depressed immune system, thiamine deactivation (low gastric acid, behavioral disorders, etc.), premenstrual syndrome, Ca deficiency (osteoporosis, hypertension, mood swings, etc.), tooth cavities, hearing loss, diabetes type II, cramps, muscle weakness, impotence (lack of NO), aggression (lack of NO), fibromas, K deficiency (arrhythmia, hypertension, some forms of cancer), Fe accumulation, etc. Finally, because there are so many variables involved in the Mg metabolism, evaluating the effect of Mg in many diseases has frustrated many researchers who have simply tried supplementation with Mg, without undertaking the task of ensuring its absorption and preventing excessive elimination, rendering the study of Mg deficiency much more difficult than for most other nutr

Poor bowel control, dementia, low potassium levels and the brain

What to do with lose bowel with someone who has dementia and diabetes?  Low potassium levels can cause diarrhea. Email motherhealth@gmail.com if you have an answer as one of our clients have this case.

I remembered caring for a male client with pancreatic cancer and on dextrose (salt, sugar, water) in the hospital 3 days before he died. His liquid poop is similar to that of a newborn , towards the end it is so dark in color.

While some are constipated , our brain controls our movement and during the last stage of a our disease, we have poor bowel function.

What will the effect be when using activated charcoal and or potassium and magnesium rich diet of veggies in this scenario?

Some have good appetite while others cannot swallow. A client becomes eligible for hospice care when he/she cannot swallow.

Some clients in care homes are still able to swallow but immobile during the last stage of their Alzheimer that their family then decides to expire them with sublingual morphine.

Many times, even with sublingual morphine it takes more than a week for some. We trained our caregivers to be at their side, massaging them or just praying with them.

Remember that during the last stage of our lives, the last sense to go is the sense of hearing.

Connie

Is something in your diet causing diarrhea? – Harvard Health

Jul 12, 2016 – Diarrhea may be caused by a number of factors. When it comes to diet, foods that are sugary, fatty, spicy, or fried can cause loose stools or make them worse.…

Diet for Eldery Patients With Diarrhea | LIVESTRONG.COM

https://www.livestrong.com › Diseases and Conditions

Aug 14, 2017 – American adults experience on average one episode of acute diarrhea every year, according to The National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse. Diarrhea, described as loose, watery stools, is a common health complaint that affects people of all ages, including seniors. Some seniors may …

Could mom’s diarrhea be caused by her dementia? – AgingCare.com

Dec 3, 2012 – My mother-in-law had the same problem for quite a while. This was when she was still getting around on her own. It took a couple of months to figure it out. She had a stash of Ducolax laxatives tucked away in a kitchen cabinet. The diarrhea cleared right up after that discovery! You just never know what …

Missing: potassium

Factors associated with irritable bowel syndrome symptoms in …

by B Fiderkiewicz – ‎2011 – ‎Cited by 14 – ‎Related articles

Apr 21, 2011 – AIM: To investigate clinical characteristics associated with the presence of irritable bowelsyndrome (IBS) symptoms in hemodialysis (HD) patients. …. Symptoms of IBS were more frequent in patients with a post-hemodialysis potassium level ≤ 3.5 mEq/L than in subjects with potassium > 3.5 mEq/L. Also …

Low Potassium: Hypokalemia Symptoms, Causes, Levels & Treatment

Learn about low potassium (hypokalemia) causes like vomiting, diarrhea, medications, laxatives, diuretics, renal disease and more. Symptoms, diagnosis, diet, levels, side effects, and treatment information is provided.

Dementia and Bladder and Bowel Control · Continence Foundation of …

People with dementia have memory loss. They may be confused and not know where they are. This confusion can cause bladder and bowel control problems or make the problems worse. People withdementia may have trouble with: knowing they need to pass urine or empty their bowels; holding on until they get to the …

Missing: potassium

Alzheimer’s Disease And Incontinence – Bladder & Bowel Community

https://www.bladderandbowel.org › Associated Illness

Alzheimer’s Disease is the most common form of dementia, which is caused by a physical disease of the brain. It is a progressive illness, which causes loss of memory, judgment and language. Between 60 – 70% of those with Alzheimer’s will go on to suffer from incontinence issues. Incontinence should not be considered …

Missing: potassium

How Do You Know that a Person is the Last Stages of Alzheimer’s?

https://www.caring.com › … › End-Stage Dementia & Alzheimer’s

Oct 27, 2017 – When a person with dementia reaches the advanced or end stage of Alzheimer’s disease, he or she usually displays the following physical and cognitive signs:

Eldercare At Home: Diarrhea > Resources > Health in Aging

Understanding the Problem Diarrhea is the passing of three or more loose or watery stools per day, or a definite decrease in consistency and increase in frequency of bowel movements based upon what is usual for the individual. (Simply put, diarrhea is when a person goes to the bathroom more often.

[PDF]Wrestling With Dementia anD Death – Dementia Australia

Wrestling. With Dementia. anD Death a rePOrt FOr alzheimer’s australia. PaPer 34 june, 2013. By PrOFessOr jenny aBBey …. They also often supply outreach palliative care services. Incontinence. Incontinence is the loss of control of bladder and/or bowel function. Palliative approach. A focus on comfort and care of an …

Alcohol causes gut damage with bacteria entering the blood stream

Eat whole foods or nuts rich in magnesium, potassium and calcium before drinking alcohol late afternoon.  Always have protein when drinking. Alcohol facilitates aging.

Connie

How Alcohol Ruins Your Health

By Dr Mercola

Acutely, alcohol depresses your central nervous system, which slows down the communication between your brain cells. Your limbic system, which controls emotions, is also affected. This is why alcohol consumption lowers your inhibitions.

Your prefrontal cortex, a brain region associated with reasoning and judgment, also slows in response to alcohol, leading to more impulsive behavior and poor judgment.

At higher doses, your cerebellum, which plays a role in muscle activity, will also be impacted, leading to dizziness and loss of balance. Over time — even over as short a period as one month — alcohol:4,5,6

Increases liver stiffness, which increases your risk of liver cirrhosis. In the film, after one month, the liver stiffness of the binge-drinking brother was increased from 3.9 to 4.9 — a 25 percent increase in liver inflammation that leads to cirrhosis.

The moderate-drinking brother fared nearly as badly. His liver stiffness increased from 3.9 to 4.8, so spreading the drinks out did not make any significant difference in terms of the liver damage caused by 21 units of alcohol per week.

Diminishes the formation of memories due to ethanol buildup in the brain. This is why you may not remember what you did while you were drunk. Alcohol also causes your hippocampus to shrink, which affects memory and learning.

Promotes systemic inflammation. The two brothers both had significant increases in five different inflammatory markers, although binge drinking caused a more dramatic rise.

Studies have shown even a single binge causes a dramatic rise in inflammation. In other words, your body reacts to alcohol in the same way as it reacts to injury or infection.

Increases stress on your heart, raising your risk for cardiomyopathy, arrhythmias, high blood pressure and stroke.

Blood alcohol levels spike two to three hours AFTER your last drink, which means it may occur in the middle of the night during sleep. This raises your risk of accidental death due to choking on your own vomit and/or suffering cardiac failure or stroke while sleeping.

Significantly increases endotoxin levels. In other words, alcohol causes gut damage allowing bacteria to escape from your gut into your blood stream.

The film showed that bingeing caused significantly worse damage, suggesting one week between binges is nowhere near enough to heal the gut damage caused by high amounts of alcohol. That said, regular consumption also led to elevated endotoxin levels, suggesting 21 units of alcohol per week is too much, and “sensible” drinking limits likely need to be much lower. How low is still unclear.

These are just a handful of the physical effects of alcohol. In reality, alcohol affects every part of your body, as shown in this Healthline infographic.7 In terms of chronic disease, studies have linked excessive alcohol consumption with an increased risk for poor immune function (which raises your risk for most diseases), pancreatitis and cancer.

Blood magnesium levels , dementia and alcohol

When you really want a small taste of your alcohol, drink it 5 to 7 hours before bedtime. Most seniors sleep at 11pm so that would be 4pm in the afternoon for his favorite diluted Martini.

Connie Dello Buono

Image shows a wine glass.

LOW LEVELS OF ALCOHOL MAY BE GOOD FOR THE BRAIN

According to researchers, a small alcoholic drink each day may be beneficial for brain health. Using mice, researchers found low levels of alcohol consumption is associated with less brain inflammation and a more effective glymphatic system. This allows CSF to flow more efficiently through the brain and remove waste that can lead to neurodegenerative diseases. READ MORE…

What Are the Links between Alcohol and Dementia?

While dementia can be idiopathic (from no specific source), there are several sub-types that can be linked directly to alcohol use disorder. Learn more.

Alcohol-related brain damage (including Korsakoff’s syndrome …

Alcohol-related brain damage (ARBD) is a brain disorder caused by regularly drinking too muchalcohol over several years. The term ARBD covers several different conditions including Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome and alcoholic dementia. … However, in contrast to common causes of …

Alcohol and dementia: What’s the truth? – BBC News – BBC.com

Feb 21, 2018 – What do we know about the risks of dementia from drinking alcohol?

Korsakoff Syndrome | Signs, Symptoms, & Diagnosis

Korsakoff syndrome, often associated with alcoholism, is a dementia related to Alzheimer’s disease. Learn about Korsakoff symptoms and treatment … Korsakoff syndrome is most commonly caused byalcohol misuse, but certain other conditions also can cause the syndrome. About; Symptoms; Diagnosis; Causes & risks …

About · ‎Symptoms · ‎Diagnosis

An Overview of Alcoholic Dementia – Verywell Mind

https://www.verywellmind.com › Disorders › Addiction › Alcohol Use

Feb 15, 2018 – Excessive drinking over a period of years may lead to a condition known as alcoholic dementia (formally described as alcohol-induced major neurocognitive disorder in the DSM 5), which can cause problems with memory, learning, and other cognitive skills.

Alcohol Induced Dementia | Does Alcohol Cause Dementia?

https://www.therecoveryvillage.com › Alcoholism and Alcohol Addiction

Jan 25, 2018 – Some studies and research show the potential for alcohol-induced dementia, and details of this condition are below.

Alcohol-related dementia – Wikipedia

Alcohol-related dementia (ARD) is a form of dementia caused by long-term, excessive consumption ofalcoholic beverages, resulting in neurological damage and impaired cognitive function. Contents. [hide]. 1 Terminology; 2 Signs and symptoms; 3 Pathophysiology; 4 Diagnosis. 4.1 Diagnostic criteria. 5 Treatment; 6 …

Contribution of alcohol use disorders to the burden of dementia in …

by M Schwarzinger – ‎2018 – ‎Cited by 4

Feb 20, 2018 – Dementia is a prevalent condition, affecting 5–7% of people aged 60 years and older, and a leading cause of disability in people aged 60 years and older globally. We aimed to examine the association between alcohol use disorders and dementia risk, with an emphasis on early-onsetdementia (<65 …

Alcohol use disorder is a ‘major risk factor’ for dementia

Feb 21, 2018 – In a large-scale study, links between alcohol use disorder and dementia are fleshed out. The relationship is stronger than previously thought.

Excessive alcohol use linked to early-onset dementia risk – CNN

Feb 21, 2018 – Excessive alcohol use could increase your risk for all types of dementia, particularly early-onset dementia, according to a new study.

Eating Fish May Reduce Multiple Sclerosis Risk

Eating Fish May Reduce Multiple Sclerosis Risk

Summary: A new study reveals eating fish regularly and taking daily fish oil supplements may reduce the risk of developing multiple sclerosis. Researchers report high fish intake is associated with a 45% reduced risk of developing MS.

Source: AAN.

Eating fish at least once a week or eating fish one to three times per month in addition to taking daily fish oil supplements may be associated with a reduced risk of multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 70th Annual Meeting in Los Angeles, April 21 to 27, 2018. These findings suggest that the omega-3 fatty acids found in fish may be associated with lowering the risk of developing MS.

Multiple sclerosis is a disease of the central nervous system that affects communication between the brain and other parts of the body. With MS, the body’s immune system attacks myelin, the fatty white substance that insulates and protects the nerves. This disrupts the signals between the brain and the rest of the body. Symptoms of MS may include fatigue, numbness, tingling or difficulty walking. The first episode of MS symptoms, lasting at least 24 hours, is known as clinically isolated syndrome. There is no cure for MS.

“Consuming fish that contain omega-3 fatty acids has been shown to have a variety of health benefits, so we wanted to see if this simple lifestyle modification, regularly eating fish and taking fish oil supplements, could reduce the risk of MS,” said study author Annette Langer-Gould, MD, PhD, of Kaiser Permanente Southern California in Pasadena, Calif., and a member of the American Academy of Neurology.

For this study, researchers examined the diets of 1,153 people with an average age of 36 from a variety of backgrounds, about half of whom had been diagnosed with MS or clinically isolated syndrome.

Participants were asked about how much fish they regularly ate. High fish intake was defined as either eating one serving of fish per week or eating one to three servings per month in addition to taking daily fish oil supplements. Low intake was defined as less than one serving of fish per month and no fish oil supplements. Examples of fish consumed by study participants include shrimp, salmon and tuna.

salmon

The study found that high fish intake was associated with a 45 percent reduced risk of MS or clinically isolated syndrome when compared with those who ate fish less than once a month and did not take fish oil supplements. A total of 180 of those with MS had high fish intake compared to 251 of the healthy controls.

The study also looked at 13 genetic variations in a human gene cluster that regulates fatty acid levels. Researchers found two of the 13 genetic variations examined were associated with a lower risk of MS, even after accounting for the higher fish intake. This may mean that some people may have a genetic advantage when it comes to regulating fatty acid levels.

While the study suggests that omega-3 fatty acids, and how they are processed by the body, may play an important role in reducing MS risk, Langer-Gould emphasizes that it simply shows an association and not cause and effect. More research is needed to confirm the findings and to examine how omega-3 fatty acids may affect inflammation, metabolism and nerve function.

Fish such as salmon, sardines, lake trout and albacore tuna are generally recommended as good sources of omega-3 fatty acids.

ABOUT THIS NEUROSCIENCE RESEARCH ARTICLE

Funding: The study was supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

Source: Renee Tessman – AAN
Publisher: Organized by NeuroscienceNews.com.