Antacids TUMs , UTI, stroke, impaired kidney function

THE FOUR COMMON ANTACIDS AND THE HEALTH RISKS THEY POSE

    

Many people experience the fiery chest pain of heartburn or the chronic bitter taste in the mouth or burning sensation in the throat when waking up in the morning.  For them, these conditions are a daily trial and they often turn to antacids to douse these maladies.  Although generally effective and safe for occasional use, antacids do have side effects that you need to know about.

Antacids are sold over the counter under many brand names and are available in chewable, liquid, and tablet form.  Doctors say that all of them work by neutralizing gastroesophageal reflux disease (commonly known as GERD), which occurs when stomach acid backs up into the esophagus and causes that burning sensation in the chest.  For the fastest relief, liquid products are probably the best choice, although all forms work relatively quickly, quelling symptoms in a matter of minutes.

Health experts say that when used only occasionally or on a short-term basis, antacids usually pose no risk, but sometimes they cause more problems than they solve.  Because they contain different active ingredients, each type may affect you differently.  If, for instance, you find that relief is only temporary and that your heartburn returns with a vengeance in an hour or so, you may be suffering from acid rebound.  According to medical experts, this condition sometimes occurs when your antacid contains large amounts of calcium carbonate or sodium bicarbonate.  The solution may be as simple as switching to a different antacid.

It is important to be aware of the side effects caused by the four common antacids:

1. Aluminum compounds (Amphojel, Rolaids).  These antacids are effective at providing relief, though slower-acting than some other antacids.  Frequent use often causes constipation.  Long-term use may also promote mineral deficiencies, particularly of calcium.  There is some evidence that increased aluminum intake may increase the risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

2. Calcium carbonate (Calcium-Rich Rolaids, Titralac, Tums).  Quick relief is provided by the high calcium content of these antacids.  They can be taken daily.  But for some people, daily use may cause severe constipation.  Also may cause acid rebound.  There is some evidence that excess calcium may promote the formation of kidney stones or impair kidney function.

3. Magnesium compounds (Gaviscon, Maalox, Mylanta, Riopan).  These antacids provide quick relief.  They may have a laxative effect, except when mixed with other ingredients.  Products often include aluminum or calcium to offset the laxative effect of the magnesium, but these minerals may also cause adverse effects.  This group of antacids is not recommended for people with kidney disease.  Use among elderly people, particularly those with diabetes, may result in hypertension and/or cardiac problems.

4. Sodium bicarbonate (Alka Seltzer, Bromo Seltzer, Rolaids).  The main ingredient, baking soda, provides quick relief, but these antacids should be limited to short-term use.  Taken too often, these antacids may cause kidney and heart malfunction, an increase in urinary tract infections, and disruption of the body’s mineral balance.  Their high sodium content may also make them dangerous for those who have high blood pressure or who are on a sodium-restricted diet.

Experts warn not to take antacids if you have chronic, severe heartburn.  You may mask a condition that should be treated by a doctor.  When left untreated, chronic heartburn can eventually lead to ulceration and bleeding of the esophagus, breathing difficulties, and even esophageal cancer.

How to have healthy blood flow to your heart?

blood flowI believe that a healthy blood flow to the heart starts with clean alkaline blood processed by a healthy liver free from toxins such as drugs, alcohol and toxic medications (narcotics).  Consumption of foods rich in nutrients such as folate, Vitamin C and B and L-arginine amino acid can prevent mitochondrial damage.  Example of foods rich in these nutrients are cage-free eggs, dairy products like cultured yogurtkefir and raw cheeses (choose organic and raw dairy whenever possible) Grass-fed beef or meat and pasture-raised poultry (including turkey and chicken) Liver and organ meats (such as chicken liver pate).

And the most important factors for a healthy heart are deep cleansing breath from calm mind, sleep, stress-free and healthy lifestyle with positive energies from sunshine, massage and grounding (walking barefoot on the beach or ground).

Connie


Sun, Earth and the Human Touch — 3 Key Principles for Healthy Blood Flow

Pollack has also clearly demonstrated there are three natural energies that result in separation of charges that create flow:

1.Sunlight charges up your blood vessels, which increases the flow of blood. When the sun’s rays penetrate your skin, it causes a massive increase of nitric oxide that acts as a vasodilator. As much as 60 percent of your blood can be shunted to the surface of your skin through the action of nitric oxide. This helps absorb solar radiation, which then causes the water in your blood to capture the energy and become structured.

This is a key component for a healthy heart. The ideal is to be exposed to the sun while grounding, meaning walking barefoot. This forms a biological circuit that makes it work even better.

2.Negative ions from the Earth, also known as earthing or grounding. This also charges up your blood vessels, creates a separation of charges, creates more positive ions and allows the blood to flow upward, against gravity.

3.The field effect or touch from another living being, such as laying on of hands.


Mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) is one of the family of mitochondrial cytopathies, which also include MERRF, and Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy.

Most people with MELAS have a buildup of lactic acid in their bodies, a condition called lactic acidosis. Increased acidity in the blood can lead to vomiting, abdominal pain, extreme tiredness (fatigue), muscle weakness, loss of bowel control, and difficulty breathing. Less commonly, people with MELAS may experience involuntary muscle spasms (myoclonus), impaired muscle coordination (ataxia), hearing loss, heart and kidney problems, diabetes, epilepsy, and hormonal imbalances.

MELAS is a condition that affects many of the body’s systems, particularly the brain and nervous system (encephalo-) and muscles (myopathy). In most cases, the signs and symptoms of this disorder appear in childhood following a period of normal development.[3]Early symptoms may include muscle weakness and pain, recurrent headaches, loss of appetite, vomiting, and seizures. Most affected individuals experience stroke-like episodes beginning before age 40. These episodes often involve temporary muscle weakness on one side of the body (hemiparesis), altered consciousness, vision abnormalities, seizures, and severe headaches resembling migraines. Repeated stroke-like episodes can progressively damage the brain, leading to vision loss, problems with movement, and a loss of intellectual function (dementia). The stroke-like episodes can be mis-diagnosed as epilepsy by a doctor not aware of the MELAS condition.

Patients are managed according to what areas of the body are affected at a particular time. Enzymesamino acidsantioxidants and vitamins have been used.

Also the following supplements may help:

  • CoQ10 has been helpful for some MELAS patients.[7] Nicotinamide has been used because complex l accepts electrons from NADH and ultimately transfers electrons to CoQ10.
  • Riboflavin has been reported to improve the function of a patient with complex l deficiency and the 3250T-C mutation.[8]
  • The administration of L-arginine during the acute and interictal periods may represent a potential new therapy for this syndrome to reduce brain damage due to impairment of vasodilation in intracerebral arteries due to nitric oxide depletion

Vagus Nerve Stimulation Boosts Post-Stroke Motor Skill Recovery

Vagus Nerve Stimulation Boosts Post-Stroke Motor Skill Recovery

Summary: Vagus nerve stimulation coupled with physical therapy following a stroke can significantly help to boost motor skill recovery, researchers report.

Source: University of Texas at Dallas.

Researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas have demonstrated a method to accelerate motor skill recovery after a stroke by helping the brain reorganize itself more quickly.

In a preclinical study, the scientists paired vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) with a physical therapy task aimed at improving the function of an upper limb in rodents. The results showed a doubled long-term recovery rate relative to current therapy methods, not only in the targeted task but also in similar muscle movements that were not specifically rehabbed. Their work was recently published in the journal Stroke.

A clinical trial to test the technique in humans is underway in Dallas and 15 other sites across the country.

Dr. Michael Kilgard, associate director of the Texas Biomedical Device Center (TxBDC) and Margaret Forde Jonsson Professor of Neuroscience in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, led the research team with Dr. Seth Hays, the TxBDC director of preclinical research and assistant professor of bioengineering in the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science, and postdoctoral researcher Eric Meyers PhD’17.

“Our experiment was designed to ask this new question: After a stroke, do you have to rehabilitate every single action?” Kilgard said. “If VNS helps you, is it only helping with the exact motion or function you paired with stimulation? What we found was that it also improves similar motor skills as well, and that those results were sustained months beyond the completion of VNS-paired therapy.”

Kilgard said the results provide an important step toward creating guidelines for standardized usage of VNS for post-stroke therapy.

“This study tells us that if we use this approach on complicated motor skills, those improvements can filter down to improve simpler movements,” he said.

Building Stronger Cell Connections

When a stroke occurs, nerve cells in the brain can die due to lack of blood flow. An arm’s or a leg’s motor skills fail because, though the nerve cells in the limb are fine, there’s no longer a connection between them and the brain. Established rehab methods bypass the brain’s damaged area and enlist other brain cells to handle the lost functions. However, there aren’t many neurons to spare, so the patient has a long-lasting movement deficit.

The vagus nerve controls the parasympathetic nervous system, which oversees elements of many unconscious body functions, including digestion and circulation. Electrical stimulation of the nerve is achieved via an implanted device in the neck. Already used in humans to treat depression and epilepsy, VNS is a well-documented technique for fine-tuning brain function.

The UT Dallas study’s application of VNS strengthens the communication path to the neurons that are taking over for those damaged by stroke. The experiments showed a threefold-to-fivefold increase in engaged neurons when adding VNS to rehab.

“We have long hypothesized that VNS is making new connections in the brain, but nothing was known for sure,” Hays said. “This is the first evidence that we are driving changes in the brain in animals after brain injury. It’s a big step forward in understanding how the therapy works — this reorganization that we predicted would underlie the benefits of VNS.”

In anticipation of the technique’s eventual use in humans, the team is working on an at-home rehab system targeting the upper limbs.

“We’ve designed a tablet app outlining hand and arm tasks for patients to interact with, delivering VNS as needed,” Meyers said. “We can very precisely assess their performance and monitor recovery remotely. This is all doable at home.”

Expanding the Possibilities for Therapy

The researchers are motivated in part by an understanding of the practical limitations of current therapeutic options for patients.

“If you have a stroke, you may have a limited time with a therapist,” Hays said. “So when we create guidelines for a therapist, we now know to advise doing one complex activity as many times as possible, as opposed to a variety of activities. That was an important finding — it was exciting that not only do we improve the task that we trained on, but also relatively similar tasks. You are getting generalization to related things, and you’re getting sustained improvement months down the line.”

vns

For stroke patients, the opportunity to benefit from this technology may not be far off.

“A clinical trial that started here at UTD is now running nationwide, including at UT Southwestern,” Kilgard said. “They are recruiting patients. People in Dallas can enroll now — which is only fitting, because this work developed here, down to publishing this in a journal of the American Heart Association, which is based here in Dallas. This is a homegrown effort.

“The ongoing clinical trial is the last step in getting approved as an established therapy,” Kilgard said. “We’re hopefully within a year of having this be standard practice for chronic stroke.”

ABOUT THIS NEUROSCIENCE RESEARCH ARTICLE

Funding: his research was funded by the National Institutes of Health. Other UT Dallas researchers involved include Dr. Robert Rennaker, director of the TxBDC, Texas Instruments Distinguished Chair in Bioengineering and chairman of the Department of Bioengineering; research assistant and Green Fellow Elaine S. Lai, research assistant Bleyda R. Solorzano BS’14 and neuroscience senior Justin James.

Source: Stephen Fontenot – University of Texas at Dallas
Publisher: Organized by NeuroscienceNews.com.
Image Source: NeuroscienceNews.com image is credited to Manu5. Licensed CC BY SA 4.0.
Original Research: Abstract for “Vagus Nerve Stimulation Enhances Stable Plasticity and Generalization of Stroke Recovery” by Eric C. Meyers, Bleyda R. Solorzano, Justin James, Patrick D. Ganzer, Elaine S. Lai, Robert L. Rennaker, Michael P. Kilgard, Sand eth A. Hays in Stroke. Published online January 25 2018.
doi:10.1161/STROKEAHA.117.019202

 

University of Texas at Dallas “Vagus Nerve Stimulation Boosts Post-Stroke Motor Skill Recovery.” NeuroscienceNews. NeuroscienceNews, 28 March 2018.
<http://neurosciencenews.com/stroke-motor-skill-vn-8703/&gt;.

Abstract

Vagus Nerve Stimulation Enhances Stable Plasticity and Generalization of Stroke Recovery

Background and Purpose—Chronic impairment of the arm and hand is a common consequence of stroke. Animal and human studies indicate that brief bursts of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) in conjunction with rehabilitative training improve recovery of motor function after stroke. In this study, we tested whether VNS could promote generalization, long-lasting recovery, and structural plasticity in motor networks.

Methods—Rats were trained on a fully automated, quantitative task that measures forelimb supination. On task proficiency, unilateral cortical and subcortical ischemic lesions were administered. One week after ischemic lesion, rats were randomly assigned to receive 6 weeks of rehabilitative training on the supination task with or without VNS. Rats then underwent 4 weeks of testing on a task assessing forelimb strength to test generalization of recovery. Finally, the durability of VNS benefits was tested on the supination task 2 months after the cessation of VNS. After the conclusion of behavioral testing, viral tracing was performed to assess synaptic connectivity in motor networks.

Results—VNS enhances plasticity in corticospinal motor networks to increase synaptic connectivity to musculature of the rehabilitated forelimb. Adding VNS more than doubled the benefit of rehabilitative training, and the improvements lasted months after the end of VNS. Pairing VNS with supination training also significantly improved performance on a similar, but untrained task that emphasized volitional forelimb strength, suggesting generalization of forelimb recovery.

Conclusions—This study provides the first evidence that VNS paired with rehabilitative training after stroke (1) doubles long-lasting recovery on a complex task involving forelimb supination, (2) doubles recovery on a simple motor task that was not paired with VNS, and (3) enhances structural plasticity in motor networks.


Connie’s comments at http://www.clubalthea.com

Observations with one of our clients (65 yr old female hispanic) where we sent caregivers for her to help with daily living after a stroke:

We massage (softer in the neck) her head, neck, legs and arms with rosemary and coconut oil. We serve soup daily. We ensured that when she walked , we are at her side. We taught her to move her legs in sitting position. Calming music and soft lights are used.

We ensured that family members give her a hug and kiss and avoid fights and verbal abuse.

She is thriving slowly.

If she was my mom, I would buy whole foods rich in folate and Vitamin B complex, probiotic, CQ10 and omega 3 supplements , sunshine exposure early morn and late afternoon, clean water, and a routine with less clutter, obstruction, confusion and calming environment.

And to remind her deep breathing exercises and bed exercises similar to Pilates.

Email motherhealth@gmail.com as your health coach ($500 per year, family plan) and to order essential supplements for your heart delivered at your door monthly from Life Extension. Paypal conniedbuono@gmail.com or mail check at 1708 Hallmark Lane San Jose CA 95124. Chase Bank is still processing our merchant service account.

Less melanin in white people leads to less folate for blood production

Less melanin in white leads to less folate and more melanin in dark colored skin people affects Vitamin D and Calcium absorption

White people must get sunshine to help in folate absorption (folic acid – important nutrient for the blood ) while dark-colored skin people must eat whole foods rich in Vitamin D3 , calcium , omega 3 , Vitamin K2 and magnesium to protect them from diseases related to the heart and circulation/vascular system.

As a result, depression is prevalent among whites while circulatory health issues are common among dark colored skin.

See your doctor for more preventive measures.

Connie Dello Buono

The color of skin is influenced by a number of pigments, including melanin, carotene, and hemoglobin. Recall that melanin is produced by cells called melanocytes, which are found scattered throughout the stratum basale of the epidermis. The melanin is transferred into the keratinocytes via a cellular organelle called a melanosome (Figure 5.7).

This figure consists of two diagrams side by side. The right diagram shows development of light colored skin; the left shows development of dark-colored skin. In both, a brown melanocyte sits at the border between the dermis and epidermis. The melanocyte has a large nucleus and six finger-like extensions. These reach between cells of the stratum basalis. Sections of the extensions detach and travel through the skins. These are melanosomes. In the left diagram, both the melanocyte and melanosomes contain melanin particles, shown as dark dots. Melanosomes travel upwards to outer skin layers, releasing melanin. As a result, keratinocytes in the left diagram contain several melanin particles that darken skin color. In light colored skin, the melanocyte contains no melanin. It still releases melanosomes into upper layers of the skin; however, these melanosomes contain no melanin. Therefore, the skin does not darken and remains light.
Figure 5.7. Skin Pigmentation
The relative coloration of the skin depends of the amount of melanin produced by melanocytes in the stratum basale and taken up by keratinocytes.

Melanin occurs in two primary forms. Eumelanin exists as black and brown, whereas pheomelanin provides a red color. Dark-skinned individuals produce more melanin than those with pale skin. Exposure to the UV rays of the sun or a tanning salon causes melanin to be manufactured and built up in keratinocytes, as sun exposure stimulates keratinocytes to secrete chemicals that stimulate melanocytes.

The accumulation of melanin in keratinocytes results in the darkening of the skin, or a tan. This increased melanin accumulation protects the DNA of epidermal cells from UV ray damage and the breakdown of folic acid, a nutrient necessary for our health and well-being.

In contrast, too much melanin can interfere with the production of vitamin D, an important nutrient involved in calcium absorption.

Thus, the amount of melanin present in our skin is dependent on a balance between available sunlight and folic acid destruction, and protection from UV radiation and vitamin D production.

It requires about 10 days after initial sun exposure for melanin synthesis to peak, which is why pale-skinned individuals tend to suffer sunburns of the epidermis initially. Dark-skinned individuals can also get sunburns, but are more protected than are pale-skinned individuals. Melanosomes are temporary structures that are eventually destroyed by fusion with lysosomes; this fact, along with melanin-filled keratinocytes in the stratum corneum sloughing off, makes tanning impermanent.

Too much sun exposure can eventually lead to wrinkling due to the destruction of the cellular structure of the skin, and in severe cases, can cause sufficient DNA damage to result in skin cancer.

When there is an irregular accumulation of melanocytes in the skin, freckles appear. Moles are larger masses of melanocytes, and although most are benign, they should be monitored for changes that might indicate the presence of cancer (Figure 5.8).

Five photos of moles. The three upper photos show moles that are small, flat, and dark brown. The bottom left photo shows a dark black mole that is raised above the skin. The bottom right photo shows a large, raised, reddish mole with protruding hairs.
Figure 5.8. Moles
Moles range from benign accumulations of melanocytes to melanomas. These structures populate the landscape of our skin. (credit: the National Cancer Institute)
 
 

SKIN DISCOLORATION

The first thing a clinician sees is the skin, and so the examination of the skin should be part of any thorough physical examination. Most skin disorders are relatively benign, but a few, including melanomas, can be fatal if untreated. A couple of the more noticeable disorders, albinism and vitiligo, affect the appearance of the skin and its accessory organs. Although neither is fatal, it would be hard to claim that they are benign, at least to the individuals so afflicted.

Albinism is a genetic disorder that affects (completely or partially) the coloring of skin, hair, and eyes. The defect is primarily due to the inability of melanocytes to produce melanin. Individuals with albinism tend to appear white or very pale due to the lack of melanin in their skin and hair. Recall that melanin helps protect the skin from the harmful effects of UV radiation. Individuals with albinism tend to need more protection from UV radiation, as they are more prone to sunburns and skin cancer. They also tend to be more sensitive to light and have vision problems due to the lack of pigmentation on the retinal wall. Treatment of this disorder usually involves addressing the symptoms, such as limiting UV light exposure to the skin and eyes.

In vitiligo, the melanocytes in certain areas lose their ability to produce melanin, possibly due to an autoimmune reaction. This leads to a loss of color in patches (Figure 5.9). Neither albinism nor vitiligo directly affects the lifespan of an individual.

This photo shows the back of a man’s neck. There is a large, discolored patch of skin at the base of his hairline. The discolored area extends over the ears onto the cheeks, toward the front of the face. The man’s head and facial hair are mostly gray, but white patches of hair are seen above the discolored skin.
Figure 5.9. Vitiligo
Individuals with vitiligo experience depigmentation that results in lighter colored patches of skin. The condition is especially noticeable on darker skin. (credit: Klaus D. Peter)
 

Other changes in the appearance of skin coloration can be indicative of diseases associated with other body systems. Liver disease or liver cancer can cause the accumulation of bile and the yellow pigment bilirubin, leading to the skin appearing yellow or jaundiced (jaune is the French word for “yellow”). Tumors of the pituitary gland can result in the secretion of large amounts of melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH), which results in a darkening of the skin. Similarly, Addison’s disease can stimulate the release of excess amounts of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), which can give the skin a deep bronze color.

A sudden drop in oxygenation can affect skin color, causing the skin to initially turn pale (white), a condition called pallor. With a prolonged reduction in oxygen levels, dark red deoxyhemoglobin becomes dominant in the blood, making the skin appear blue, a condition referred to as cyanosis (kyanos is the Greek word for “blue”).

This happens when the oxygen supply is restricted, as when someone is experiencing difficulty in breathing because of asthma or a heart attack. However, in these cases the effect on skin color has nothing do with the skin’s pigmentation.

INTERACTIVE LINK

This ABC video follows the story of a pair of fraternal African-American twins, one of whom is albino. Watch this video to learn about the challenges these children and their family face. Which ethnicities do you think are exempt from the possibility of albinism?

Calcium and magnesium balance 60:40 ratio

Sucrose, gut bacteria, toxins, and muscle integrity

Aspiring and Omega 3

Aspirin and omega3 fatty acids work together to fight inflammation. … Now researchers show that aspirin helps trigger the production of molecules called resolvins that are naturally made by the body from omega3 fatty acids.Feb 21, 2013

Aspirin & Omega-3 Drug Interaction | LIVESTRONG.COM

https://www.livestrong.com › Food and Drink

People in the United States use more omega3 fatty acids than any other non-vitamin or non-mineralsupplement, according to the National Center for… … that induce blood clotting. Blood clots can cause a heart attack or a stroke, so by inhibiting blood clotting, aspirin reduces your risk of developing these conditions.

Heart Disease Prevention, Aspirin & Fish Oil | Dr. McDougall’s Health …

Purslane is the richest source of these beneficial omega3 fats of any plant yet studied. Because of that happy fact, you may find this leafy vegetable becoming a popular food item in the United States. Second-line therapy might include an aspirin tablet a day for those people at high risk for a heart attack or a stroke.

Healthy Omega-3 Fats and Aspirin Work Together to Fight Inflammation

Feb 21, 2013 – Healthy Omega3 Fats and Aspirin Work Together to Fight Inflammation. … New research published this week in the Cell Press journal Chemistry & Biology shows how the combination of omega3 fatty acids and aspirin can put up a powerful fight against inflammatory conditions likeheart disease and arthritis.

Omega-3 Supplements and Cardiovascular Diseases – NCBI – NIH

by A Mohebi-Nejad – ‎2014 – ‎Cited by 11 – ‎Related articles

One potential safety concern with omega3 supplement use is the risk for hemorrhagic stroke. At very high doses (e.g. 15 grams per day), omega3 fatty acids increase bleeding time (15).

Is It Safe to Mix Fish Oil and Blood Thinners? | Heart MD Institute – Dr …

Sep 6, 2016 – The omega3 fatty acids in fish oil help make blood platelets less likely to clot; antiplatelet blood thinners do the same thing. Too much of both can increase the risk for excessive bleeding from minor, everyday cuts or from the gastrointestinal side effects of drugs like aspirin or NSAIDs, as well as bruising or …

Aspirin and omega-3 fatty acids work together to fight inflammation …

Feb 21, 2013 – Now researchers show that aspirin helps trigger the production of molecules called resolvins that are naturally made by the body from omega3 fatty acids. These resolvins shut off, or “resolve,” the inflammation that underlies destructive conditions such as inflammatory lung disease,heart disease, and …

Should you consider taking a fish oil supplement? – Harvard Health

Dec 1, 2017 – The AHA’s earlier recommendation, published in 2002, advised people with known heartdisease to consume about a gram per day of the omega3 fatty … fish oil may increase bleeding risk, particularly in people who also take anti-clotting medications, including warfarin (Coumadin) and low-dose aspirin.

Fish Oil Vs. Aspirin – Dr. Thaddeus Gala, DC

Fish oil gets to the root cause of inflammation. Aspirin treats the symptoms of inflammation. I suggest that people take fish oil on a regular basis to help with overall heart health, and of course the many other benefits from taking Omega 3’s. To be clear – I am a bigger fan of animal based Omega 3’s such as fish or krill oil, …

Should I take aspirin even if I take omega 3 supplements daily …

Hello, the health benefits of omega3 supplements are suggested but not absolutely clear and are mainly in heart health. Aspirin therapy may be helpfu.

Heart supplements: Proceed with caution – Consumer Reports

The omega3 fatty acids in fish oil, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), appear to be most effective at lowering triglycerides, an artery-clogging fat in the blood. They might also protect the heart by slightly raising HDL (good) cholesterol, lowering blood pressure, and reducing inflammation.

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