My scientist friend asked how to detox or clean his body from toxins

Over the years, I have experienced family and friends dying of cancer. I observed their lifestyle and toxins they are exposed to. So to answer my friend’s question on how to detox and the mechanism of cleaning our body or getting rid of toxins, I listed some items for Dos and Donts.

Our lymphatic system which travels opposite our blood is responsible for cleaning our blood.  Search for lymphatic, massage and detox in this site http://www.clubalthea.com

When we clean the many bad foods or toxins that entered our body, we must clean our liver first, our laboratory.  It is closely linked to our heart that during our last breath, our liver is the first and last signal that our heart gets to shut down.

Detox or cleaning our cells from toxins is the key to living longer, the anti-aging process we all are seeking for. In my 50s, I could have died long time ago if I was born centuries ago with no clean water, fresh produce and raising a dozen children. Each child is minus 5 years of a woman’s age.

Detox is like cleaning the toilet. The following are detox tips and anti-aging tips to clean your cells:

Dos in cleansing your body from toxin, also detoxes your liver

  • Massage
  • Adequate sleep
  • Filtered water
  • Lemon
  • Baking soda (pinch in your drinking water)
  • Activated charcoal
  • Digestive enzymes from pineapple and papaya
  • Apple cider vinegar
  • Wash produce with salt or diluted vinegar
  • No over ripe fruits and left over foods or 3-day old rice ( aflatoxin , mycotoxin )
  • No charred BBQ
  • Whole foods ; sulfur rich as they are anti-inflammatory (ginger, garlic, turmeric, coconut, walnuts)
  • Deep breathing thru nose and blow out thru mouth
  • Prayer: May God’s light energy be with you and say Amen to accept it.
  • Resveratrol from Berries, kiwi, citrus fruit
  • Fasting
  • Activated charcoal
  • Clean air

Donts are ways that when practiced or consumed can kills our nerve cells and produce toxins in our cells.

  • Avoidance of too much caffeine, iron and sugar, these are food for cancer
  • Other metal toxins
  • TRANS fat
  • Processed
  • Plastics in food
  • Stress
  • Shift work: not sleeping from 10pm to 4 am
  • Radiation
  • Over medications, chemo, other carcinogens
  • Avoid exposure to fumes, chemicals (formaldehydes,carcinogens,toxins)

 

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Hi Connnie,

And what is your recipe for liver detox and the mechanism by which it works to accomplish that?

From: Male friend in his late 50s whose brother died of pancreatic cancer

Caring for your thyroid gland

  • Hypothyroidism, or underactive thyroid, is a very common problem, and there are many reasons for this, including drinking chlorinated and fluoridated water, and eating brominated flour
  • Chlorine, fluoride, and bromine are all in the same family as iodine, and can displace iodine in your thyroid gland
  • Dr. Jonathan Wright, a pioneer in natural medicine, recommend that women take about 6 mg of iodine per day, and men about 3 mg per day to protect their thyroid and breast health
  • Another principal cause of hypothyroidism is related to elevated reverse T3 levels, which can become elevated in response to heavy metal toxicity. In such cases, successful treatment must include detoxification
  • Hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid) can be successfully and quickly reversed with a treatment protocol using Lugol’s iodine and lithium

Hypothyroidism is far more prevalent than once thought. Some experts believe that anywhere between 10 and 40 percent of Americans have suboptimal thyroid function. Thyroid hormones are used by every cell of your body to regulate metabolism and body weight by controlling the burning of fat for energy and heat. They’re also required for optimal brain function and development in children. If you feel sluggish and tired, have difficulty losing weight, have dry skin, hair loss, constipation, cold sensitivity, and/or lack of sweating, these could be signs of hypothyroidism.

Iodine is the key to a healthy thyroid, and if you’re not getting enough from your diet (in the form of seafood), you’d be well advised to consider taking a supplement, ideally a high-quality seaweed supplement (be sure to check its source to avoid potential radioactive contamination), or other iodine-containing whole food supplement.

Elimination of carbon-based toxins, such as herbicides and pesticides, can be promoted through sauna-induced sweating. The Hubbard Protocol takes it a step further, and involves the use of niacin, high-intensity exercises, and sauna on a regular basis to help mobilize and eliminate toxins. Unfortunately, sweating doesn’t readily eliminate toxic metals. For those, you need a more aggressive approach, such as chelation.

One option that can help minimize the loss of crucial microminerals is to use chelating suppositories. They will still pull out minerals from your system, but you don’t have to worry about it nullifying the nutritional value of the food you just ate, which is a concern anytime you take an oral chelating agent. One drawback is that it takes a bit longer. “I’ve seen some people who have to do rectal suppository stuff for a couple of years to get all their toxic metals out,” he says. “And yes, we check their normal minerals fairly routinely, every couple of months, just to make sure it’s not being overdone that way.”

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/06/15/hypothyroid-hyperthyroid-disease.aspx


Thyroid blood tests and more

Thyroid tests — but not the usual standard-issue tests.

Request:

  • TSH, free T3, free T4, and reverse T3
  •  Check those adrenals: Measure cortisol first thing in the morning, free and total testosterone, and DHEA.
  • Also get progesterone on day 21-23 (if you’re cycling), fasting insulin and glucose, IGF-1 (growth hormone) and glucose.

Email motherhealth@gmail.com to get this Thyroid blood panel test:

  • Thyroid Antibody Panel
  • Item Catalog Number: LC100004
This panel contains the following tests:

  • Thyroid antithyroglobulin antibody (ATA)
  • Thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO)

Thyroglobulin and thyroid peroxidase are proteins involved in the production of thyroid hormones. It is possible for antibodies from your own immune system to attack these proteins rendering them dysfunctional. Both are often used in conjunction with each other to assess thyroid function, follow treatment for thyroid disease and differentiate between autoimmune conditions of the thyroid.

Antibodies to either of these important thyroid proteins can result in symptoms of low thyroid such as fatigue, weight gain, dry skin and constipation. Conditions such as Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia often have these antibodies present.

Fasting is not required for this test. Take all medications as prescribed.

Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals Alter Thyroid Levels in Pregnancy and May Affect Fetal Brain Development

A new study led by biologist R. Thomas Zoeller of the University of Massachusetts Amherst provides “the strongest evidence to date” that endocrine disrupting chemicals such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) found in flame retardant cloth, paint, adhesives and electrical transformers, can interfere with thyroid hormone action in pregnant women and may travel across the placenta to affect the fetus.

Results appeared in an early online edition and in the December print edition of the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. The paper was honored this week as an “extramural paper of the month” by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.

Zoeller says, “As endocrine-disrupting chemicals, PCBs interfere with the way the thyroid hormone functions, but they don’t actually change the amount of the hormone found in the body. Although these effects are largely invisible in scientific studies that only judge thyroid activity by measuring hormone levels, they may be having a real impact on infants’ brain development.”

Although endocrine-disrupting PCBs were banned in the United States in 1979, they are still released into the environment from disposal sites or products manufactured before the ban. Most people have been exposed to low levels of PCBs, Zoeller points out.

In this prospective birth cohort study, he and colleagues looked at the effects of low-dose chemical exposure in 164 pregnant women. Tissue from their placentas, the uterine structure that provides oxygen and nutrients to the fetus, was analyzed for a specific enzyme, CYP1A1, which changes endocrine-disrupting chemicals into a form that can interfere directly with the body’s thyroid hormone receptors.

This work was a collaboration between scientists in the biology department at UMass Amherst and physician scientists led by Larissa Takser at the University of Sherbrooke, Québec, who collected placental tissue from a large epidemiological study. Biochemistry and experimental work conducted at Zoeller’s UMass Amherst laboratory over the past decade provided the framework for the analyses. “This led us to predict specific molecular events that might be occurring in the placenta,” he notes, “and as best as we can tell right now, we were correct.”

The image shows a pregnant woman. A ultrasound scan of a baby is layered on to her stomach.

Zoeller and colleagues found that in pregnancies where the placenta contained higher levels of CYP1A1, it also showed signs of thyroid disruption. Levels of two thyroid-regulated genes tended to be higher in these pregnancies, although the mother’s overall thyroid hormone levels did not change.

“Whatever is happening in the placenta likely reflects what is happening in the fetus,” says Zoeller. “To truly understand how endocrine-disrupting chemicals may be affecting pregnancies, the findings show we need to study not only hormone levels, but hormone activity at the cellular level.”

The effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals may be particularly insidious in people who smoke, Zoeller said. The enzyme CYP1A1 is supposed to clean the blood, and the body produces more of this enzyme when it is exposed to cigarette smoke. The researchers found pregnant women who smoked tended to have higher levels of the enzyme in the placental tissue.

ABOUT THIS NEURODEVELOPMENT RESEARCH

In addition to Zoeller, other authors at UMass Amherst are Thomas Luke Wadzinski, Katherine Geromini, Judy McKinley Brewer and Ruby Bansal, with Nadia Abdelouahab and Marie-France Langlois in addition to Takser at the University of Sherbrooke.

Contact: Janet Lathrop – University of Massachusetts Amherst
Source: University of Massachusetts Amherst press release
Image Source: The image is credited to Skitterphoto and is in the public domain
Original Research: Abstract for “Endocrine Disruption in Human Placenta: Expression of the Dioxin-Inducible Enzyme, Cyp1a1, Is Correlated With That of Thyroid Hormone-Regulated Genes” by Thomas L. Wadzinski, Katherine Geromini, Judy McKinley Brewer, Ruby Bansal, Nadia Abdelouahab, Marie-France Langlois, Larissa Takser and R. Thomas Zoeller in Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. Published online October 9 2014 doi:10.1210/jc.2014-2629