Diet which allows fruits, dairy and vegetarian friendly

Fruits contain sugars (especially over ripe ones) and vitamin C and other nutrients and fibers.  Sour fruits and vitamin C-rich fruits have anti-cancer properties.

Diet which allows fruits include:

  • Carb cycling
  • Plant paradox
  • Intuitive eating
  • Dr Grundry’s diet evolution
  • The Flexitarian diet
  • The fast diet
  • Dash diet
  • The lose your belly diet
  • The Mediterranean diet
  • The MIND diet
  • The SETPOINT diet
  • NOOM

 

What are the healthy foods for 50-year-old people?

A poor man in his 100, has always been eating yams or sweet potatoes daily.
A 120 year old Italian widow eats 2 boiled eggs a day.
Doctors tell the family of a dying patient to give him/her what she feels like eating.
Each of us have unique set of microbiome or organisms in our gut that can cause cancer or help us live longer.
If retired, cook and prepare your meals daily. If not retired, use simple foods and prepared with proper hygiene.

If one of the family member died of cancer, do a liver cleaning food to kill infections or parasites.

Aspire to eat your nutrients from foods and not be over medicated.

Bitter greens, banana, soft boiled egg, lemons, soups, salads (washed with vinegar or salt water) and sour fruits. Avoid foods with trans fat, molds, additives, processed salt or sugar, alcohol, caffeine, restaurant foods and fast foods, soda, milk and cheese and red meat.

Morning foods: eggs, soy or almond milk, green tea or fresh ginger with lemon tea, soup, filtered water), boiled sweet potatoes or yams, berries

Late afternoon and lunch foods: apples, banana, avocado, soup , calcium and magnesium rich foods, coconut water

Avoid foods with parasites:

Up to nearly 10% of Americans may be infected with brain parasites found in undercooked meat. One example is the brain-invasive pork tapeworm, which is the most common cause of adult-onset epilepsy. Allergenic fish worms found in nearly two-thirds of retail fish tested can trigger allergic reactions in sensitive individuals. There have been migratory skin worms found in undercooked fish (like in sushi).

Cheese may contain mites and maggots and organ meats may contain other worms. Nearly 95% of tested retail U.S. beef (including burgers) has been found to be parasite infested. The meat industry has responded to this problem by feeding arsenic to chickens and turkeys to reduce the parasite load; this arsenic may be linked to increased cancer risk in consumers, and adding bacteria-eating viruses to meat would not help one avoid the brain parasite, toxoplasma, the second leading cause of foodborne disease-related death in the United States. Being bitten by the external parasite, a lone star tick, may result in developing an allergy to meat.

  • Have an apple, banana and 1 soft boiled eggs a day.
  • Have warm soup a day, with ginger.
  • Have hot tea of lemon, ginger, and favorite fruits (plum, apples,pears,kiwi )
  • Have sweet potatoes tops and guava tops (greens from tip of stem) added in soups.
  • Chew often, healthy foods from fresh pineapple and papaya.
  • Do not eat left overs.
  • Stay away from alcohol even red wine.
  • Stay away from oils, over cooked oils.
  • DO not get your calcium and magnesium from milk and milk products.

Why we get fat and hungry

What if what is advised to us to lose weight didn’t work?

It is biology that will make us understand our body. What is surprising that low carb or reducing carbohydrates is a common practice for weight loss. In 1797, a Scottish military surgeon John Rollo successfully treated diabetes patient with low carbohydrate diet. They recommended to avoid carbohydrate and eat meat instead in order to cure obesity.  1977 was when created a diet plan to cut fat and replace it into heart healthy food such as bread and pasta. It said that it’s not total calories that makes you gain weight, it’s hormones.

One particular hormones, also known as fat storage hormone. When there’s insulin, there’s fat. How does insulin works in your body? Blood glucose or blood carbs arises when you eat carbohydrates, particularly low in fiber. This thing causes insulin release, so insulin can carry the glucose into the cells that has insulin receptor. Which then allows the cell to break in the glucose and produce energy in the form of phosphate.

However, this process can only process in a certain rate. In the form of glycogen you can store 200g in the muscle, and 70g in the liver. Where those are filled up, insulin receptors decrease on those cells, so glucose can’t go in. But the glucose needs to go somewhere. Because if it sits in the bloodstream, it will bind the protein in damaging process called glycation.

Glycation is a process where sugar in the bloodstream mucks onto proteins, creating something called advanced glycation end products or AGE’s for short.

Banana for example, as it gets more ripe, you see some brown spots on the peel and if you peel the banana you can see some dark spots which are particularly sweet. The same thing happens to your skin over time: proteins in your bloodstream get sugar stuck on them and the resulting AGE’s damage your skin internally, creating age spots. You can also see these spots from external damage from the sun.

Glucose processing: your muscles and liver have stored as much glucose as they can, and your body really does not want glucose overloading the cells, so it decreases the insulin receptors on most cells preventing the glucose from getting in. Then, glucose is broken down and stored as triglycerides in the only place where insulin receptors are actually increasing-your body fat.

So this is how carbohydrates and the insulin response cause you to get fat. To use the energy within our fat issues, fatty acids are taken out of the tissue to be broken down for energy. Which obviously would make you shed fat. But when you have a high serum insulin level from eating too much carbohydrate, you cannot break down your fat tissue because the enzyme that allows that – hormone sensitive lipase, is sensitive to insulin, which will not allow the fat to be broken down.

So you then have this situation where insulin won’t let you use your fat for energy, so when you’re low on energy, you’re going to feel very lethargic and hungry until you get new glucose. This is how high blood sugar and insulin keeps you fat and keeps you hungry.

People don’t get fat because they want to eat all the time, they want to eat all the time because they’re getting fat.

So then, are people staying fat because they don’t exercise, or do they not exercise because they don’t have energy available to do so?

Anti-parasites diet by Connie Dello Buono

Up to nearly 10% of Americans may be infected with brain parasites found in undercooked meat. One example is the brain-invasive pork tapeworm, which is the most common cause of adult-onset epilepsy. Allergenic fish worms found in nearly two-thirds of retail fish tested can trigger allergic reactions in sensitive individuals. There have been migratory skin worms found in undercooked fish (like in sushi). Cheese may contain mites and maggots and organ meats may contain other worms.

Cheese: asiago, bel paese, bleu/blue, brick, brie, camembert, emmental, gorgonzola, gruyere, muenster, port de salut, roquefort, stilton, swiss, pork

Nearly 95% of tested retail U.S. beef (including burgers) has been found to be parasite infested. The meat industry has responded to this problem by feeding arsenic to chickens and turkeys to reduce the parasite load; this arsenic may be linked to increased cancer risk in consumers, and adding bacteria-eating viruses to meat would not help one avoid the brain parasite, toxoplasma, the second leading cause of foodborne disease-related death in the United States. Being bitten by the external parasite, a lone star tick, may result in developing an allergy to meat.

Anti-parasite diet by Connie Dello Buono

  • Avoid cheese, under-cooked meat, salads and produce not properly washed with vinegar or salt water, over ripe fruits, eat limes and berries, pineapple and papaya, sweet potatoes or yams, pine nuts, and eat less on fermented foods (except fiber-rich).
  • Consume less fat and sugar filled and processed foods but eat more fiber-rich foods, freshly cooked and well cooked. Combine meat with veggies. Eat less fermented veggies and alcohol drinks.
  • Add cabbage , tomatoes and lemon when cooking fish or meat to kill the parasites.  Boil milk if you wanted to drink 2% milk.  Add garlic, onions and sulfur rich foods in your meals daily. Eat well washed raw carrots and garlic.
  • Have a banana at night (not over ripe).
  • Avoid caffeine and chocolate until you have completed your anti-parasitic meds.
  • Lowering your fat intake from keto diet, lowers the supply of cholesterol for parasites to thrive.
  • Warm drink of decaf tea, soy milk, almond milk
  • Use all kinds of coconut from oil to milk.  Do not consume 3-day old rice or left over foods. Wear gloves when washing fish.
  • Promote good hygiene. Freeze fish for portion you cannot eat within 2 days.  Do not eat wilted veggies or moldy and rotten.

Anti-Parasites Diet

Up to nearly 10% of Americans may be infected with brain parasites found in undercooked meat. One example is the brain-invasive pork tapeworm, which is the most common cause of adult-onset epilepsy. Allergenic fish worms found in almost 66% of retail fish tested can trigger allergic reaction in delicate/sensitive people.

There have been migratory skin worms found in half-cooked fish (like in sushi). Cheese may contain parasites and slimy parasites and organ meats may contain different worms. Cheese: asiago, bel paese, bleu/blue, brick, brie, camembert, emmental, gorgonzola, gruyere, muenster, port de salut, roquefort, stilton, swiss, pork Nearly 95% of tested retail U.S. meat (including burgers) has been observed to be parasite plagued. 

The meat business has reacted to this issue by encouraging arsenic to chickens and turkeys to reduce the parasite load; this arsenic might be connected to increased of cancer risk in customers, and adding bacteria-eating viruses to meat would not help one to keep away the brain parasite, toxoplasma, the second leading reason for foodborne sickness related death  in the US. 

Being bitten by the outer parasite, a lone star tick, may result in developing an allergy to meat. Anti-parasite diet Avoid cheese, under-cooked meat, salads and produce not properly washed with vinegar or salt water, over ripe fruits, eat limes and berries, pineapple and papaya, sweet potatoes or yams, pine nuts, and eat less on fermented foods (except fiber-rich). Consume less fat and sugar filled and processed foods but eat more fiber-rich foods, freshly cooked and well cooked.

Combine meat with veggies. Eat less fermented veggies and alcohol drinks. Add cabbage, tomatoes and lemon when cooking fish or meat to kill the parasites. Boil milk if you wanted to drink 2% milk. Add garlic, onions and sulfur rich foods in your meals daily. Eat well washed raw carrots and garlic. Have a banana at night (not over ripe). Avoid caffeine and chocolate until you have completed your anti-parasitic meds.

Lowering your fat intake from keto diet, lowers the supply of cholesterol for parasites to thrive. Use all kinds of coconut from oil to milk. Do not consume 3-day old rice or left over foods. Wear gloves when washing fish. Promote good hygiene. Freeze fish for portion you cannot eat within 2 days. Do not eat wilted veggies or moldy and rotten.

More tips:

  • Avoid simple carbohydrates, such as those found in refined foods, fruits, juices, dairy products, and all sugars, except honey.
  • Eat more raw garlic, pumpkin seeds, pomegranates, beets, and carrots, all of which have been used traditionally used to kill parasites. In one study, researchers found that a mixture of honey and papaya seeds cleared stools of parasites in 23 out of 30 subjects. Drink a lot of water to help flush out your system.
  • Eat more fiber, which may help get rid of worms.
  • Probiotics (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacilus plantarum, Saccharomyces boulardii, and bifidobacteria). Help keep your digestive tract healthy. Probiotics may not be appropriate in some severely immune compromised patients. Talk to your doctor.
  • Digestive enzymes will help restore your intestinal tract to its normal state, which makes it inhospitable to parasites. Papain is an enzyme from the papaya plant that may help kill worms when taken 30 minutes before or after meals. Papain may increase bleeding in people with clotting disorders, or in those taking blood-thinning medications, such as warfarin (Coumadin) among others.
  • Vitamin C. Supports the immune system. Lower the dose if diarrhea develops.
  • Vitamin A (VitA) is a micronutrient that is crucial for maintaining vision, promoting growth and development, and protecting epithelium and mucus integrity in the body. VitA is known as an anti-inflammation vitamin because of its critical role in enhancing immune function.
  • Zinc. Supports the immune system. Zinc may interact with certain medications, particularly some antibiotics, and it may not be appropriate for people with HIV/AIDS. Talk to your doctor.
  • Niacin deficiency in pellagra associated with certain parasites, seems to be due to the impairment in the further degradation of 3-hydroxykynurenine to niacin.

Herbs

Herbs are a way to strengthen and tone the body’s systems. As with any therapy, you should work with your doctor to diagnose your problem before starting treatment. You may use herbs as dried extracts (capsules, powders, or teas), glycerites (glycerine extracts), or tinctures (alcohol extracts). People with a history of alcoholism should not take tinctures.

Many of the herbs used to treat intestinal parasites have toxic side effects or interfere with other medications. Use them only under the supervision of a qualified practitioner. Your health care provider should treat you with the most gentle herb that is effective for the type of parasite you have. A few of the herbs that your provider might consider include:

  • Garlic (Allium sativum)
  • Barberry (Berberis vulgaris)
  • Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis)
  • Oregon grape (Berberis aquifolium)
  • Anise (Pimpinella anisum)
  • Wormwood ((Artemisia annua))
  • Curled mint (Mentha crispa)
  • Black walnuts (Juglans nigra)

Recipe: Search this site for food, anti-inflammation, sulfur rich foods, diet, toxins

Recipe:

Search this site for food, anti-inflammation, sulfur rich foods, diet, toxins

Eggs are rich in immune boosting nutrients , egg yolk kills fungus

Eggs have long been recognized as a source of high-quality protein. The World Health Organization (WHO) and other public health authorities actually use eggs as their reference standard for evaluating the protein quality in all other foods. Egg protein is usually referred to as “HBV” protein, meaning protein with High Biological Value. Since eggs are used as the reference standard for food protein, they score 100% on the HBV chart. The high quality of egg protein is based on the mixture of amino acids it contains. (Amino acids are the building blocks for making proteins.) Eggs provide a complete range of amino acids, including branched chain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine, valine), sulfur-containing amino acids (methionine, cysteine), lysine, tryptophan, and all other essential amino acids. Their protein is sometimes referred to as a “complete protein” for this reason.

Egg yolks contain at least seven essential minerals, including:
  • 22 mg calcium.
  • 0.46 mg iron.
  • 1 mg magnesium.
  • 66 mg phosphorus.
  • 19 mg potassium.
  • 8 mg sodium.
  • 0.39 mg zinc.
Boiled Eggs Sulfur Smell: Amino Acids

Most amino acids do not contain sulfur. However, two do contain sulfur in addition to nitrogen—methionine and cysteine.

Kale, cabbage, onions, garlic and broccoli are some of the most nutritious foods on earth.… Make sure your diet includes freshly crushed garlic, onions, broccoli, fish and other foods high in sulfur. … Onions, eggs, cruciferous vegetables and other foods high in sulfur are considered health promoting.

My grandma burned the egg yolk to apply on my the fungus on my feet which heals faster than boiled guava leaves.
keywords: Burn, Egg yolk, Wound, Silver sulfadiazine, Rat …. It kills a wide variety of bacteria.

 

All B vitamins are found in eggs, including vitamins B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, B12, choline, biotin, and folic acid. Choline is a standout among these B vitamins. In fact, eggs rank higher in choline than any of our other WHFoods. In the U.S., an average diet provides about 300 milligrams of choline per day – less than the recommended amount for an adult woman (425 milligrams) or an adult man (550 milligrams). Since one egg provides over 100 milligrams of choline and only 75-80 calories, it provides far more choline for far less calories than most other choline-rich foods.

The mineral content of eggs also deserves special mention here–not because eggs are a rich source of most minerals but because they are a rich source of certain minerals that can sometimes be difficult to obtain from other foods. Eggs are a very good source of both selenium and iodine. While many fish, shellfish, and mushrooms can be rich sources of selenium, persons who avoid these foods may sometimes have difficulty getting an adequate amount of this important antioxidant mineral from food. For persons who do not use iodized salt in recipes or at the table and who do not consume either yogurt or cow’s milk, this mineral can also sometimes be challenging to obtain from food.

The nutrients found in an egg are distributed fairly evenly between the yolk and the white. This distribution of nutrients is a common characteristic of whole, natural foods and it is one of the reasons that we recommend consumption of whole eggs (except, of course, when only the yolk or the white is called for in a recipe). The chart below explains what approximate percent of the total nutrient amount is found in the yolk and the white of an egg. You will notice that the first four nutrient groupings are those that are found predominately in the egg white, while those that follow are found predominately in the egg yolk (all except for the last nutrient, selenium, which is divided fairly evenly between the egg white and yolk).

 

Nutrient Egg White Egg Yolk
Protein 60% 40%
Magnesium, Potassium, Sodium 10-25%
Vitamin B3 90% 10%
Vitamin B2 62% 38%
Total Fat 10% 90%
Omega-3 Fats 0% 100%
Vitamins A, D, E, K 0% 100%
Carotenoids 0% 100%
Vitamins B5, B6, B12, Folate, Choline 10% or less 90% or more
Calcium, Phosphorus, Zinc, Copper, Iron 10% or less 90% or more
Manganese 30% 70%
Vitamin B1 25% 75%
Biotin 20% 80%
Selenium 41% 59%

Omega-3 Support

In recent years, there has been a food marketplace trend of greater availability of eggs that are unusually rich in omega-3 fats. These eggs get their high levels of omega-3s through the addition of omega-3 oils to the hen’s feed. Oils added to the hen’s diet as a way of increasing omega-3s include menhaden oil, krill oil, flaxseed oil, and algae oil. The supplementation of the hen’s diet with these oils usually produces as much as 250 milligrams of omega-3s per egg yolk.

What many consumers do not know is that virtually all egg yolks contain omega-3 fats and that by providing hens with a natural, pasture-based diet their omega-3 levels can be naturally increased. Pasture feeding can provide the hen with clover and alfalfa, two examples of legumes that are rich in omega-3s; in fact, pasture feeding can double the amount of omega-3s in an egg yolk. Omega-3s are far too low in the average U.S. diet, and eggs from pasture-raised chickens can provide significant amounts of these anti-inflammatory fats.

Could Manipulating the Microbiome Treat Food Allergies?

University of Chicago immunologist Cathryn Nagler began to suspect that the body’s resident bacteria play a role in food allergies almost two decades ago. A handful of studies of germfree mice in the 1980s and ’90s had suggested that bacteria in the gut, or compounds they produce, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), are important in teaching the immune system not to overreact to the foods we eat. But it was a new mouse model of peanut allergy, developed by researchers at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York in 2000, that really made Nagler think about whether the gut microbiome might be involved in how humans respond to dietary antigens.

The mouse strain they used, C3H/HeJ, carried a mutation in the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). This protein had recently been shown to mediate immune responses triggered by a bacterial antigen known as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and the mutant mice were consequently nonresponsive to LPS. But according to the 2000 paper, the animals also exhibited anaphylaxis—a sometimes fatal allergic reaction in people—upon exposure to freshly ground peanuts.

It made Nagler wonder if TLR4—and specifically, the propensity of certain gut bacteria to activate it—was the key to tolerance to dietary antigens. Sure enough, when she treated mice with broad-spectrum antibiotics to deplete their intestinal bacteria, even animals with wildtype TLR4 had severe reactions to food allergens. “That established a role of signaling by bacteria in the gut in regulating responses to food,” she says. “And then all of the studies we’ve done since then, over 15 years, have built on that.”

These days, there is little doubt that the body’s resident bacteria have a big say in how the immune system responds to food allergens. Research into the underlying causes of food allergies has blossomed to parallel the condition’s growing prevalence: an estimated 6 percent of children and up to 10 percent of adults in the US have an allergy to some food. Scientists have identified connections between a person’s microbial makeup and whether or not that person has a food allergy. Microbiome differences also help determine which children will outgrow their food allergies and which won’t, notes Supinda Bunyavanich, a physician scientist at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. “So it suggests that there is an impact of these microbiota on the clinical outcomes.”

Further research in mice has demonstrated a causal relationship between the microbiome and allergic reactions to food. In January, Nagler and her colleagues published the results of an experiment in which they transferred fecal samples from healthy human infants and from infants with cow’s milk allergy to germfree mice. Control animals that did not receive a fecal transplant, as well as mice that received samples from the allergic babies, became sensitized to the milk protein β-lactoglobulin, developing an allergic response upon repeated exposure to the protein. Mice that had received transplants from healthy infants, on the other hand, tolerated the dietary antigen without any issues.

Exploring the microbiomes of the mice, the researchers identified one particular bacterial species, Anaerostipes caccae, that was significantly reduced in rodents that demonstrated an allergic response to cow’s milk. The team also showed that transferring this species “to germfree mice is sufficient to protect against an allergic response to” cow’s milk, Nagler says.

In June, researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital got similar results with a different allergen in a different mouse model. The team found that transplanting fecal material from healthy human babies into their own mouse model of severe egg allergy protected the animals against anaphylaxis, whereas a transplant of fecal material from babies with food allergies provided no such protection. Moreover, they found that feeding allergic mice a consortium of Clostridium or Bacteroides species or even the single species Subdoligranulum variabile was sufficient to provide protection against egg allergy.

“They’re not exactly the same data, but they seem to be very consistent,” study coauthor Rima Rachid, a clinical researcher at Boston Children’s, says of her results and those of Nagler’s group. “We’re very happy, because the science is being validated.”

The mechanisms underlying the bacteria’s effect on response to food allergens appear to be multifaceted. In Rachid’s recent study, the researchers found that the microbes somehow trigger the formation of a type of regulatory T cell called retinoid-related orphan receptor gamma (RoRγ) T cells. If the investigators removed these T cells from their mouse model, the animals had severe reactions to allergen exposure, even after transplants of the protective bacteria. And a study published in May found that germfree or antibiotic-treated mice develop a different type of regulatory T cell that cause elevated level of immunoglobulin E, an antibody that is known to mediate food-allergic reactions. Other work has pointed to a possible role for basophils, immune cells involved in inflammatory responses, and Nagler says she and her colleagues are still working out the role of TLR4.

While researchers continue to untangle these mechanisms, many scientists already have an eye toward microbiome-manipulating interventions for preventing or treating food allergies. Currently, the standard of care for such conditions simply involves avoiding the culpable antigens and being prepared with an epinephrine autoinjector (EpiPen) and an antihistamine in the event of accidental exposures. Immunotherapy, in which patients are exposed to low, increasing doses of an allergen over time, has recently become an option as well, but it only works for some patients, Rachid notes. “There is really an unmet need here for finding better treatment for food allergy.”

Several clinical trials have tested the effects of probiotic supplementation, with promising but mixed results. “When it comes to probiotics, so far the studies done are not very definitive,” says Rachid. The approach is worth pursuing further, she says, noting that she and her colleagues hope to develop probiotics based on the bacterial species they recently identified as protective against food allergy. At the same time, Rachid is overseeing the first clinical trial for fecal transplant for peanut allergy. “It’s a very interesting approach where you’re trying to change the whole microbiome.” The researchers are currently screening potential trial participants.

“There’s tremendous interest in this,” says Bunyavanich, adding that some of her colleagues have started companies to move such approaches forward. “The fact that food allergies have been rising in recent decades really implores us to try to figure out as much as possible what could be contributing to this.”

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Source: https://www.the-scientist.com