Eggs are rich in immune boosting nutrients , egg yolk kills fungus

Eggs have long been recognized as a source of high-quality protein. The World Health Organization (WHO) and other public health authorities actually use eggs as their reference standard for evaluating the protein quality in all other foods. Egg protein is usually referred to as “HBV” protein, meaning protein with High Biological Value. Since eggs are used as the reference standard for food protein, they score 100% on the HBV chart. The high quality of egg protein is based on the mixture of amino acids it contains. (Amino acids are the building blocks for making proteins.) Eggs provide a complete range of amino acids, including branched chain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine, valine), sulfur-containing amino acids (methionine, cysteine), lysine, tryptophan, and all other essential amino acids. Their protein is sometimes referred to as a “complete protein” for this reason.

Egg yolks contain at least seven essential minerals, including:
  • 22 mg calcium.
  • 0.46 mg iron.
  • 1 mg magnesium.
  • 66 mg phosphorus.
  • 19 mg potassium.
  • 8 mg sodium.
  • 0.39 mg zinc.
Boiled Eggs Sulfur Smell: Amino Acids

Most amino acids do not contain sulfur. However, two do contain sulfur in addition to nitrogen—methionine and cysteine.

Kale, cabbage, onions, garlic and broccoli are some of the most nutritious foods on earth.… Make sure your diet includes freshly crushed garlic, onions, broccoli, fish and other foods high in sulfur. … Onions, eggs, cruciferous vegetables and other foods high in sulfur are considered health promoting.

My grandma burned the egg yolk to apply on my the fungus on my feet which heals faster than boiled guava leaves.
keywords: Burn, Egg yolk, Wound, Silver sulfadiazine, Rat …. It kills a wide variety of bacteria.

 

All B vitamins are found in eggs, including vitamins B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, B12, choline, biotin, and folic acid. Choline is a standout among these B vitamins. In fact, eggs rank higher in choline than any of our other WHFoods. In the U.S., an average diet provides about 300 milligrams of choline per day – less than the recommended amount for an adult woman (425 milligrams) or an adult man (550 milligrams). Since one egg provides over 100 milligrams of choline and only 75-80 calories, it provides far more choline for far less calories than most other choline-rich foods.

The mineral content of eggs also deserves special mention here–not because eggs are a rich source of most minerals but because they are a rich source of certain minerals that can sometimes be difficult to obtain from other foods. Eggs are a very good source of both selenium and iodine. While many fish, shellfish, and mushrooms can be rich sources of selenium, persons who avoid these foods may sometimes have difficulty getting an adequate amount of this important antioxidant mineral from food. For persons who do not use iodized salt in recipes or at the table and who do not consume either yogurt or cow’s milk, this mineral can also sometimes be challenging to obtain from food.

The nutrients found in an egg are distributed fairly evenly between the yolk and the white. This distribution of nutrients is a common characteristic of whole, natural foods and it is one of the reasons that we recommend consumption of whole eggs (except, of course, when only the yolk or the white is called for in a recipe). The chart below explains what approximate percent of the total nutrient amount is found in the yolk and the white of an egg. You will notice that the first four nutrient groupings are those that are found predominately in the egg white, while those that follow are found predominately in the egg yolk (all except for the last nutrient, selenium, which is divided fairly evenly between the egg white and yolk).

 

Nutrient Egg White Egg Yolk
Protein 60% 40%
Magnesium, Potassium, Sodium 10-25%
Vitamin B3 90% 10%
Vitamin B2 62% 38%
Total Fat 10% 90%
Omega-3 Fats 0% 100%
Vitamins A, D, E, K 0% 100%
Carotenoids 0% 100%
Vitamins B5, B6, B12, Folate, Choline 10% or less 90% or more
Calcium, Phosphorus, Zinc, Copper, Iron 10% or less 90% or more
Manganese 30% 70%
Vitamin B1 25% 75%
Biotin 20% 80%
Selenium 41% 59%

Omega-3 Support

In recent years, there has been a food marketplace trend of greater availability of eggs that are unusually rich in omega-3 fats. These eggs get their high levels of omega-3s through the addition of omega-3 oils to the hen’s feed. Oils added to the hen’s diet as a way of increasing omega-3s include menhaden oil, krill oil, flaxseed oil, and algae oil. The supplementation of the hen’s diet with these oils usually produces as much as 250 milligrams of omega-3s per egg yolk.

What many consumers do not know is that virtually all egg yolks contain omega-3 fats and that by providing hens with a natural, pasture-based diet their omega-3 levels can be naturally increased. Pasture feeding can provide the hen with clover and alfalfa, two examples of legumes that are rich in omega-3s; in fact, pasture feeding can double the amount of omega-3s in an egg yolk. Omega-3s are far too low in the average U.S. diet, and eggs from pasture-raised chickens can provide significant amounts of these anti-inflammatory fats.

Check your bile acid production and stress level for fat metabolism

Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol

Bile begins its life in the liver and spends a significant amount of time somewhere between the liver, gallbladder, and gastrointestinal tract, specifically the intestines. Liver cells manufacture bile before it undergoes modification in the bile duct epithelium, and then it is transported to the gallbladder for storage and, ultimately, use. Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol with the aid of several different enzymes.

Soup of Sulfur rich bile acids will help balance bile production:

Mix these root crops to pinch of organic chicken broth powder: rutabaga, kale, carrot, parsnip, onion, garlic and a tsp of apple cider vinegar or lemon juice added in the last boiling.

bile

Short-chain fatty acids :  The gut microbiota can ferment complex dietary residues that are resistant to digestion by enteric enzymes.

This process provides energy for the microbiota but culminates in the release of short-chain fatty acids including butyrate, which are utilized for the metabolic needs of the colon and the body.

Butyrate has a remarkable array of colonic health-promoting and antineoplastic properties:

  • It is the preferred energy source for colonocytes,
  • It maintains mucosal integrity and it suppresses inflammation and carcinogenesis through effects on immunity, gene expression and epigenetic modulation.

Note:  Protein residues and fat-stimulated bile acids are also metabolized by the microbiota to inflammatory and/or carcinogenic metabolites, which increase the risk of neoplastic progression.

The makeup of bile is largely water, at about 95%. The remaining five percent is made up of bile acids, bilirubin, amino acids, enzymes, steroid hormones including estrogen, glutathione, cholesterol, vitamins (especially vitamin D and some of the B vitamins), porphyrins, insulin, and other items, including toxins such as heavy metals, xenobiotics, medications and drugs, and environmental toxins targeted for excretion. There are also electrolytes, including sodium, potassium, chloride, calcium, magnesium, phosphate, sulfate, and bicarbonate. As you excrete more bile acid, bile flow is stimulated. There is also a circadian rhythm to the synthesis and circulation of bile acids.

In total, there are more than 50 species of bile acids in humans, but the main ones include cholic acid and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA). Although bile salts and bile acids are frequently used interchangeably, technically bile acids become bile salts upon conjugation with glycine or taurine. The gut bacteria metabolize bile acids to create secondary bile acids, of which there are more than 400 species. After the gut bacteria metabolize them, cholic acid becomes deoxycholic acid and CDCA becomes lithocholic acid. The amount of bile acids making their way into the colon affects the microbiome makeup. Bile acids are reabsorbed in the small intestine and colon to then come back into circulation as part of the enterohepatic circulation, which is a bidirectional pathway.

Bile acids, a key component of bile, are the main emulsifiers of fat. As such, bile ultimately finds its way into the small intestine for this function. When fat enters your small intestine, you secrete CCK (cholecystokinin), which signals your gallbladder to send bile into the small intestine to aid in digestion and absorption.

Functions of bile acid

Although this may be the function of bile most commonly known, there are actually many, many more. Some of the key functions of bile include:

  • Aids the immune system through excreting certain immune system signals, such as IgA and inflammatory cytokines
  • Elimination of certain hormones and pheromones
  • Endogenous ligand (binder to stimulate a signal) for several receptors, including nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR), vitamin D receptor, and G protein-coupled receptor TGR5
  • Excretion of fat-soluble toxins and other waste, including endogenous substrates
  • Modulation of metabolic pathways, including lipid metabolism, glucose metabolism, and insulin sensitivity
  • Regulation of tight junction permeability
  • Removal of cholesterol
  • Signaling molecule and hormone

With so many different functions, it should come as no surprise that problems in the flow, metabolism, or synthesis of bile and/or bile acids could contribute to a variety of diseases.

Diseases such as colon and liver cancer

Problems with bile may stem from dysfunction in the synthesis of bile, an impairment in the secretion, or problems with the flow of bile. The metabolism of bile may become disturbed through problems stemming from the synthesis or conjugation with cholesterol, problems with the membrane transport, issues with the transport between the organs, or problems with the bacterial degradation of bile during the enterohepatic cycling. There may also be malabsorption of the bile acid, leading to higher concentrations in the colon, which may then negatively impact the function of the mucosal cells in the colon. Furthermore, when the concentration of bile acids is too high, it can be toxic and cause problems. Alterations to bile acids are also associated with disease.

The level of bile acids that reach the colon may contribute to functional bowel diseases. Elevated concentrations may contribute to diarrhea, while lower levels may play a role in constipation. In one study on children with functional constipation, the fecal bile acid profile was normal, but there were some who had the 3-sulfate version of CDCA as the dominant fecal bile acid, which could demonstrate a link for some cases.

Stress and Bile acids

Psychological stress is a risk factor for atherosclerosis, yet the pathophysiological mechanisms involved remain elusive. The transfer of cholesterol from macrophage foam cells to liver and feces (the macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport, m-RCT) is an important antiatherogenic pathway. Because exposure of mice to physical restraint, a model of psychological stress, increases serum levels of corticosterone, and as bile acid homeostasis is disrupted in glucocorticoid-treated animals, we investigated if chronic intermittent restraint stress would modify m-RCT by altering the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids. C57Bl/6J mice exposed to intermittent stress for 5 days exhibited increased transit through the large intestine and enhanced fecal bile acid excretion. Of the transcription factors and transporters that regulate bile acid homeostasis, the mRNA expression levels of the hepatic farnesoid X receptor (FXR), the bile salt export pump (BSEP), and the intestinal fibroblast growth factor 15 (FGF15) were reduced, whereas those of the ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT), responsible for active bile acid absorption, remained unchanged. Neither did the hepatic expression of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the key enzyme regulating bile acid synthesis, change in the stressed mice. Evaluation of the functionality of the m-RCT pathway revealed increased fecal excretion of bile acids that had been synthesized from macrophage-derived cholesterol. Overall, our study reveals that chronic intermittent stress in mice accelerates m-RCT specifically by increasing fecal excretion of bile acids. This novel mechanism of m-RCT induction could have antiatherogenic potential under conditions of chronic stress.

Vinegar helps increase bile production

Polyphenols such as chlorogenic acid which is present in high levels in apple cider vinegar could inhibit oxidation of LDLs and improve health by preventing cardiovascular diseases (Laranjinha and others 1994).

Asparagus soup

CREAM OF ASPARAGUS SOUP

 

 

I LOVE cream of asparagus soup, it’s pure comfort in a bowl and so simple to make. This recipe is made with just 5 ingredients, not counting salt and pepper and is ready under 25 minutes!

Skinnytastes.com

My senior client loves it too and helps him with his lung cancer and constipation.

Connie of Motherhealth caregivers 408-854-1883

INGREDIENTS:

  • 2 lbs asparagus (2 bunches), tough ends snapped off
  • 1 tbsp unsalted butter
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 6 cups reduced sodium chicken broth
  • 2 tbsp low fat sour cream
  • kosher salt and fresh pepper, to taste

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Melt butter over low heat in a large pot. Add onion and sauté until soft, about 2-minutes.
  2. Cut the asparagus in half and add to the pot along with chicken broth and black pepper, to taste. Bring to a boil, cover and cook low about 20 minutes or until asparagus is very tender.
  3. Remove from heat, add sour cream and using your hand held blender, puree until smooth (or in two batches in a large blender).

NUTRITION INFORMATION

Yield: 6 servings, Serving Size: 1 1/4 cups

  • Amount Per Serving:
  • Freestyle Points: 1
  • Points +: 2
  • Calories: 81 calories
  • Total Fat: 3g
  • Saturated Fat: 2g
  • Cholesterol: 7mg
  • Sodium: 576mg
  • Carbohydrates: 10g
  • Fiber: 4g
  • Sugar: 1g
  • Protein: 6g
All images and text ©Gina Homolka for Skinnytaste

Read more at https://www.skinnytaste.com/cream-of-asparagus-soup-2/#QvWG3MWxVODuSWyJ.99

Cream of asparagus soup

Cream of asparagus soup
Cream of broccoli soup
Carrot soup
Leek soup
Mixed Vegetable Soup
Lentil soup
Squash soup
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 20 g 30%
Saturated fat 8 g 40%
Polyunsaturated fat 5 g
Monounsaturated fat 5 g
Cholesterol 54 mg 18%
Sodium 2,528 mg 105%
Potassium 873 mg 24%
Total Carbohydrate 40 g 13%
Dietary fiber 1.8 g 7%
Protein 15 g 30%
Vitamin A 29% Vitamin C 16%
Calcium 42% Iron 11%
Vitamin B-6 10% Vitamin B-12 20%
Magnesium 12%
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

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Zinc and lemongrass for skin health issues

Mum thought her ‘melting skin’ baby would be better off dead – but her …

https://www.mirror.co.uk › News › Hospitals

Aug 6, 2015 – Instead we used thin cotton sheets. “He was most comfortable … Following her mother’s instinct, Stephanie stopped applying topical steroids and began to develop her own homeopathic balms. Having made candles in … A blend of lemongrass and zinc, applied under gauze, worked best. She said: “As time …

blend of lemongrass and zinc for lesions – Inspire

Sep 30, 2016 – 1 post

LemonGrass Balm $10: https://www.amazon.com/Lemongrass-natural-Good-Earth-Beauty/dp/B00LVCF4ZW/r ef=pd_sim_75_2?ie=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=6G3K2BRX26XMP6RC4XFA Maybe mix LemonGrass Balm w/ ZnO (Zinc Oxide) …Instead of the damaging Steroid Topicals ! Edited September 30 …

Mom Discovers That Treating Her Son With Topical Steroid Was

Aug 20, 2015 – Red raw skin, flaking off and oozing.” Smith decided to stop using topical steroids to treat her son, instead experimenting with homemade, homeopathic balms she concocted using her experience with candle-making. It was a blend of lemongrass and zinc, applied under gauze, that finally made a difference.

// Our Lemongrass and Zinc balm combo… – The Home Apothecary …

Our Lemongrass and Zinc balm combo is our top seller on our Etsy shop! These two balms were originally created for our baby son, Isaiah Quinn, as he journeyed through Topical Steroid Withdrawal. Now, (over 6,000 sales later!!!) they are used for eczema and skin conditions of all types, and many of our 500+ shop …

Kline’s road from out of control eczema to topical steroid withdrawal to …

klinestopicalsteroidhell.blogspot.com/2014/04/klines-favorite-thing-for-his-skin.html

Apr 5, 2014 – I was saving the balm for Kline and I tried his vanicream (KLINE COULD NOT TOLERATE THE VANICREAM, HE SCREAMED BLOODY MURDER..and begged me to put the lemongrass balm on him instead….the vanicream also made him have an all over body rash.) on me and it dried my skin right up, …

Mom Realizes What Doctors Have Been Treating Her Son With is …

ijr.com/2015/…/387441-mom-realizes-doctors-treating-son-exactly-whats-melting-ski…

Aug 7, 2015 – … instinct and stopped using steroids to treat Isaiah’s rashes. Instead, she started making her own homeopathic balms, experimenting with different formulations in the effort to find the most effective treatment. Image Credit: Isaiah Quinn Blog. Isaiah Quinn Blog. A combination oflemongrass and zinc seemed …

Zinc Oxide to Treat Eczema | LIVESTRONG.COM

https://www.livestrong.com › Diseases and Conditions

Topical corticosteroids can treat lichenified eczema, or skin that has thickened and toughened because of chronic scratching. Your doctor may recommend applying bandages over the corticosteroidto boost absorption of the medicine into the skin. Bandages containing ichthammol paste and zinc paste also help decrease …

Homemade zinc cream for topical steroid withdrawal/eczema sufferers …

May 10, 2017 – Uploaded by Laura Knapp

Disclaimer- Please patch test the lotion before using to ensure that you do not have an allergy to any ingredients …

Shingles Natural Treatment: Foods, Supplements & Oils to Help – Dr. Axe

#4 Vitamin B12 (1000-5000 mcg daily) Vitamin B12 helps promote faster recovery and reduced pain. #5Zinc (50 mg daily) Zinc supports immune function and has … then a doctor will likely recommend a topical shingles cream containing capsaicin, a topical numbing agent or even injections of steroids or local anesthetics.

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Knee pain relief

kneeExercise, good shoes, nutrition (sulfur rich foods) and adequate sleep.

Safer, and very effective, options to help relieve joint pain include:

  • Eggshell membrane: The eggshell membrane is the unique protective barrier between the egg white and the mineralized eggshell. The membrane contains elastin, a protein that supports cartilage health, and collagen, a fibrous protein that supports cartilage and connective tissue strength and elasticity.

    It also contains transforming growth factor-b, a protein that supports tissue rejuvenation, along with other amino acids and structural components that support the stability and flexibility of your joints by providing them with the building blocks needed to build cartilage.

  • Hyaluronic acid (HA): Hyaluronic acid is a key component of your cartilage, responsible for moving nutrients into your cells and moving waste out. One of its most important biological functions is the retention of water… second only to providing nutrients and removing waste from cells that lack a direct blood supply, such as cartilage cells.

    Unfortunately, the process of normal aging reduces the amount of HA synthesized by your body. Oral hyaluronic acid supplementation may effectively help most people cushion their joints after just 2 to 4 months.

  • Boswellia: Also known as boswellin or “Indian frankincense,” this Indian herb is one treatment I’ve found to be particularly useful against arthritic inflammation and associated pain. With sustained use, boswellia may help maintain steady blood flow to your joints, supporting your joint tissues’ ability to boost flexibility and strength.
  • Turmeric / curcumin: A study in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine found that taking turmeric extracts each day for six weeks was just as effective as ibuprofen for relieving knee osteoarthritis pain. This is most likely related to the anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin — the pigment that gives the turmeric spice its yellow-orange color.
  • Animal-based omega-3 fats: These are excellent for arthritis because omega-3s are well known to help reduce inflammation. Look for a high-quality, animal-based source such as krill oil.
  • Astaxanthin: An anti-inflammatory antioxidant that affects a wide range of inflammation mediators, but in a gentler, less concentrated manner and without the negative side effects associated with steroidal and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. And it works for a high percentage of people. In one study, more than 80 percent of arthritis sufferers improved with astaxanthin.

Chest pain, flu and fever

See your doctor when you have chest pain, flu and fever. Rest, hydration, and other remedies may help such as garlic-onion-chicken soup, citrus fruits, pineapple juice and massage. A virus in the lungs must be managed right away. Fit, young, old and almost every one can be attacked by the flu virus. So get care immediately.

Pneumonia is an infection of the lungs that causes the alveoli to become inflamed. This causes symptoms such as cough, fever, shaking, and chills. Pneumonia can develop and become a serious complication of the flu. … severe cough with large amounts of mucus.Jan 4, 2017

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