Knee pain relief

kneeExercise, good shoes, nutrition (sulfur rich foods) and adequate sleep.

Safer, and very effective, options to help relieve joint pain include:

  • Eggshell membrane: The eggshell membrane is the unique protective barrier between the egg white and the mineralized eggshell. The membrane contains elastin, a protein that supports cartilage health, and collagen, a fibrous protein that supports cartilage and connective tissue strength and elasticity.

    It also contains transforming growth factor-b, a protein that supports tissue rejuvenation, along with other amino acids and structural components that support the stability and flexibility of your joints by providing them with the building blocks needed to build cartilage.

  • Hyaluronic acid (HA): Hyaluronic acid is a key component of your cartilage, responsible for moving nutrients into your cells and moving waste out. One of its most important biological functions is the retention of water… second only to providing nutrients and removing waste from cells that lack a direct blood supply, such as cartilage cells.

    Unfortunately, the process of normal aging reduces the amount of HA synthesized by your body. Oral hyaluronic acid supplementation may effectively help most people cushion their joints after just 2 to 4 months.

  • Boswellia: Also known as boswellin or “Indian frankincense,” this Indian herb is one treatment I’ve found to be particularly useful against arthritic inflammation and associated pain. With sustained use, boswellia may help maintain steady blood flow to your joints, supporting your joint tissues’ ability to boost flexibility and strength.
  • Turmeric / curcumin: A study in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine found that taking turmeric extracts each day for six weeks was just as effective as ibuprofen for relieving knee osteoarthritis pain. This is most likely related to the anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin — the pigment that gives the turmeric spice its yellow-orange color.
  • Animal-based omega-3 fats: These are excellent for arthritis because omega-3s are well known to help reduce inflammation. Look for a high-quality, animal-based source such as krill oil.
  • Astaxanthin: An anti-inflammatory antioxidant that affects a wide range of inflammation mediators, but in a gentler, less concentrated manner and without the negative side effects associated with steroidal and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. And it works for a high percentage of people. In one study, more than 80 percent of arthritis sufferers improved with astaxanthin.

Coconut and cinnamon for Alzheimer’s disease

How can you revive your brain cells and get your memories back with coconut and cinnamon? Food and caring caregivers are important. Call 408-8541-883 for caring bay area caregivers.

Email motherhealth@gmail.com for your feedback in using coconut oil and cinnamon in getting a healthy brain.

Coconut Nutritional highlights

Coconuts are highly nutritious and rich in fibre, vitamins C, E, B1, B3, B5 and B6 and minerals including ironseleniumsodiumcalcium,magnesium and phosphorous. Unlike cow’s milk, coconut milk is lactose free so can be used as a milk substitute by those with lactose intolerance.

One tablespoon of ground cinnamon contains:

  • 19 calories.
  • 0 grams of fat, sugar, or protein.
  • 4 grams of fiber.
  • 68% manganese.
  • 8% calcium.
  • 4% iron.
  • 3% Vitamin K.

Whole foods and essential oils are high frequency foods that can help grow healthy brain cells

When cooking your greens and colored foods, add a tsp of lemon to help in the absorption of nutrients.

If you cannot eat full servings of colored fruits, veggies, nuts, fish and eggs, add quality supplementation from:

http://www.clubalthea.pxproducts.com

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Image result for recipe coconut and cinnamon
Directions
  1. In a small bowl, stir together coconut, brown sugar, and cinnamon.
  2. Measure flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt into a bowl; mix well.
  3. In a mixing bowl, beat eggs until frothy. Beat in oil and sugar. …
  4. Bake at 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) for 1 hour.

Cinnamon Coconut Loaf Recipe – Allrecipes.com

allrecipes.com/recipe/6893/cinnamon-coconut-loaf/

Gut-healing Cinnamon Coconut Latte – The Real Food Dietitians

recipe coconut and cinnamon from therealfoodrds.com
 Rating: 4.8 – ‎13 votes – ‎5 min – ‎155 cal

May 11, 2016 – And because this gut-healing cinnamon coconut latte recipe calls for little less fat (~1 Tbsp.), it’s not quite as filling (aka: calorically dense) so …

Brown Sugar Cinnamon Coconut Cookies – Chocolate Moosey

recipe coconut and cinnamon from www.chocolatemoosey.com

Dec 4, 2012 – In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon. Set aside. In a large bowl, beat together the butter, brown sugar, and sugar until creamy and smooth, about 2-3 minutes. Beat in egg and vanilla until smooth. Preheat oven to 350F. Line two cookie sheets with parchment paper.

Coconut Cinnamon Buns – I Am A Food Blog

recipe coconut and cinnamon from iamafoodblog.com

iamafoodblog.com/coconut-cinnamon-buns/

Dec 15, 2016 – Coconut Cinnamon Buns – http://www.iamafoodblog.com … Coconut CinnamonRoll Recipeyield: 9-12 cinnamon rolls prep time: 30 minutes bake …

10 Best Cinnamon Coconut Drink Recipes – Yummly

recipe coconut and cinnamon from www.yummly.com

Oct 20, 2017 – The Best Cinnamon Coconut Drink Recipes on Yummly | Spiced CoconutCoffee, Coquito Ii, Puerto Rican Coquito.

Cinnamon-Coconut Cookies | Spache the Spatula

recipe coconut and cinnamon from www.spachethespatula.com

Dec 6, 2013 – In a medium-sized bowl, combine the flour, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon; set aside. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat together the butter and sugars for 5 minutes, until creamy. Place the bowl of dough in the fridge, covered in plastic wrap, for 2 hours, or overnight.

Coconut Cinnamon Smoothie | Silk

recipe coconut and cinnamon from silk.com
150 cal

But I decided to let my husband decide on our new recipe, and low and behold……thecoconut and cinnamon is what he picked!! To make a long story short, …

No-Bake Cinnamon Coconut Cookies – Whole Natural Life

recipe coconut and cinnamon from wholenaturallife.com

wholenaturallife.com/no-bake-cinnamon-coconut-cookies/

3 cal

Oct 8, 2016 – Coconut cookies | Gluten-free cookies | Cinnamon cookies | Paleo cookies … If you enjoy making recipes with shredded coconut, I highly …

Cinnamon Coconut Ice Cream – Whole Natural Life

recipe coconut and cinnamon from wholenaturallife.com

wholenaturallife.com/cinnamon-coconut-ice-cream-dairy-free/

414.6 cal

Dec 10, 2013 – So Jesse and I have discovered a new ice cream obsession: cinnamon coconut ice cream. I mixed up a recipe on a whim a couple of weeks …

Coconut Cinnamon Rice Pudding – Mommy’s Home Cooking

recipe coconut and cinnamon from mommyshomecooking.com
 Rating: 5 – ‎10 votes – ‎1 hr 20 min

Aug 27, 2013 – This Coconut Cinnamon Rice Pudding Recipe is delicious and very easy to make. You’ll love it!

Cinnamon Coconut Loaf Recipe – Allrecipes.com

recipe coconut and cinnamon from allrecipes.com

allrecipes.com/recipe/6893/cinnamon-coconut-loaf/

 Rating: 4 – ‎23 reviews – ‎1 hr 25 min – ‎248 cal

Cinnamoncoconut, brown sugar and sour cream are swirled into the batter for this marvelous sweet bread.

Healthy Pumpkin Recipe – Pumpkin Coconut Tart — Dark rum, coconut …

Oct 8, 2014 – Healthy Pumpkin Recipe – Pumpkin Coconut Tart — Dark rum, coconut milk,cinnamon, ginger and cloves give this high-fiber, high-potassium pumpkin tart a …

{NEW}: Gluten-Free Coconut Cinnamon Millet Cereal Get the recipe …

May 9, 2014 – {NEW}: Gluten-Free Coconut Cinnamon Millet Cereal Get the recipe HERE: http://bit.ly/1kUe4Cw · #glutenfree #soyfree #breakfast #cereal #coconut #milletrecipes …

 

http://www.alz.org/facts/http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/8492918.stmhttp://www1.cbn.com/healthscience/coconut-oil-touted-alzheimers-remedyhttp://www.tampabay.com/news/aging/doctor-says-an-oil-lessened-alzheimers-effects-on-her-husband/879333https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15123336http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3665200/http://www.aarp.org/relationships/caregiving/info-10-2010/the_high_costs_of_caring_for_alzheimers_patients.htmlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4300286/http://www.alz.org/facts/http://www.alzfdn.org/AboutAlzheimers/cost.htmlhttps://www.nia.nih.gov/alzheimers/publication/part-2-what-happens-brain-ad/hallmarks-adhttp://www.alzheimers.net/2014-07-02/cinnamon-prevents-alzheimers/http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23531502http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12969264?dopt=Abstract

Foods and exercises that increase serotonin to prevent Dementia

Foods

  • Eggs. The protein in eggs can significantly boost your blood plasma levels of tryptophan, according to recent research.
  • Cheese. Cheese is another great source of tryptophan.
  • Pineapples
  • Tofu
  • Salmon, wild
  • Nuts and seeds, raw and free from molds
  • Turkey

Exercise

In numerous studies exercise has been shown to increase both serotonin production and release. In particular, aerobic exercises, like running and biking, are the most likely to boost serotonin. Yoga boost serotonin too.

Supplements

Vitamin B complex to regulate Serotonin synthesis

To order the following, use this sponsor/distributor ID:  USW9578356

https://www.nuskin.com/content/nuskin/en_US/products/shop/shop_all/lifepak/01003680.html

metabotrim

LIFEPACK 22

Season your food with Turmeric

Turmeric has emerged in recent years as a powerful antidepressant, in many cases equalling or even surpassing the effects of prescription antidepressants. Turns out that turmeric (or curcumin, rather) increases brain serotonin levels in a dose-dependent matter.

So maybe you need curcumin, the isolated polyphenol found in turmeric, to really affect depression. Maybe your chicken tikka masala isn’t replacing your SSRI. But absent outright depression or serotonin-based mood disorders, cooking with turmeric should help regulate normal serotonin levels.

Massage and Sunshine

Vitamin D—which we synthesize from UVB exposure—allows the conversion of tryptophan into serotonin.

Getting a massage boosts serotonin by 28%. ncbi.

What can harm your thyroid?

My uncle in Silicon Valley died of thyroid cancer.

Take action about your health and find out how:

  • Thyroid harming toxins in your water
  • Makeup products that are harming your health
  • How to determine if you’re mercury sensitive
  • How to detoxify your body
  • How chronic infections affect thyroid health
  • How leaky gut can lead to thyroid disorder
Mercury affects every cell and system in our body and the following are symptoms of mercury sensitivity:
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Brain fog or decreased concentration.
  • Fatigue
  • Frequent headaches.
  • Ataxia (decreased control over muscular movements such as with walking or picking up objects)
  • Sleep disturbance in children
  • Autoimmune disease

Share what you learned at motherhealth@gmail.com to be shared in this site.

Toxins are present in our environment, and there’s very little we can do to eliminate all of them. We can, however, limit our exposure to toxic compounds, reducing the likelihood of experiencing issues with our thyroid. Supplementing with iodine is also an important step toward protecting your thyroid from toxic compounds. Learn these 6 toxins that can destroy your thyroid so you can prepare yourself.

1. BPA

As an endocrine disruptor, BPA can affect hormone levels and throw thyroid function out of whack. While there are many studies documenting BPA’s effects on the thyroid in adults and children, a recent one took a different approach. By looking at newborns and their mothers, the study suggested higher levels of BPA cause a decrease in thyroid function in women. All of the baby boys, though, had an increase in thyroid function from the higher levels of BPA. The theory here is that the women—while pregnant—saw a drop in thyroid function and the sons’ thyroids overcompensated. While the trend did not carry over to newborn girls, avoiding BPA while pregnant just makes sense.

2. Bromine

Bromine is toxic to the thyroid, but with it in everything from pool cleaner to pasta, finding something without the endocrine disruptor can be tricky. [3] Often, even healthy patients can have high levels of the flame-retardant substance in their bodies. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are even finding their way into the breast milk of American women. [4] One common source of bromine is brominated vegetable oil—which is still found in many drinks—so remember, it pays to read those labels!

3. Perchlorate

Studies suggest low thyroid function in mothers is linked to neurodevelopmental problems in children. While BPA—as mentioned in number 1—or any score of nasty toxins could be the cause of an unhealthy thyroid, perchlorate is definitely one of the usual suspects. [5] [6] But while there are numerous studies linking it with thyroid problems, the FDA still approved it for use as an anti-static agent in food packaging, making avoiding it a lot more difficult.

4. Pesticides

When it comes to maintaining a healthy thyroid, avoiding pesticides could also be key. In India, thyroid disorders are on the rise, but there are measures in place to make sure much of the population has sufficient access to iodine, something essential for thyroid function. One recent study suggested this spike is due to pesticide and other chemical exposure, with experts noting almost 60 percent of cases aren’t connected to iodine-deficiency. While the idea of pesticide exposure and thyroid problems is nothing new, maintaining iodine levels and avoiding pesticides could be the perfect combination.

5. PFCs

There’s a report that a higher level of perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) in the blood could affect thyroid function in women.  Used in the manufacturing of lots of common things, PFCs can even be found in pizza boxes and takeout containers; your mattress might even contain them! Even though the use of the chemicals is being phased out in the U.S., imported products could still be a concern.  Endocrine disruptors like PFCs take a long time to break down in the body, so this study is disturbing, to say the least.

6. Fluoride

Almost 70 percent of the U.S. water supply is fluoridated to help prevent cavities. Many people don’t know, however, that fluoride was actually prescribed as a remedy for an overactive thyroid during the first half of the 20th century. According to some reports, 2 to 5 mg of fluoride per day over a period of months was all it took to lower thyroid function; this becomes a problem when you realize that’s about the same amount people drinking fluoridated water are exposed to daily.

————–

Molecular Mimicry—An Autoimmune Theory

Molecular mimicry is the theory that bacterial cells or other microbial “triggers” have a similar appearance to the cells that make up parts of our physiology or “self” antigens.

When an infection occurs, these infectious cells are recognized as foreign. This is really great for getting rid of the infections, but sometimes the immune system targets proteins in the infectious cells that resemble the proteins in our own cells. This inadvertently causes a cross-reaction with our “self” antigens, i.e., our own cells. This case of mistaken identity is thought to trigger the start of autoimmunity.

One example is Streptococcus pyogenes. This is the bacteria that causes the common throat infection known as “strep throat”. In some cases, especially when the infection is not treated with antibiotics within two to three weeks, the immune system will start launching an attack against the Streptococcus bacteria.

Unfortunately, a component of the bacteria’s cell wall resembles that of the human heart valves, and this results in the immune system attacking the human heart valves in a case of mistaken identity. This reaction is known as rheumatic fever and can be deadly and often necessitates heart valve transplants. Arnold Schwarzenegger is probably the most well known person who was affected with this condition and has had to have heart valve transplants as a result.

Which bacteria have been associated with triggering Hashimoto’s?

A variety of bacterial infections have been implicated in triggering autoimmune thyroiditis, including Helicobacter Pylori (the same bacteria that causes ulcers), Borrelia burgdorferi (associated with Lyme disease) and Yersinia enterocolitica.

Antibodies to Yersinia (indicating exposure) in people with Hashimoto’s were found fourteen times more often than in people without Hashimoto’s. Yersinia membranes contain a site that binds TSH, making it a prime suspect based on the molecular mimicry theory.  Infection with this bacteria can induce antibodies against sites that recognize and stimulate TSH receptors, like the thyroid peroxidase enzyme or thyroglobulin.

People can contract a Yersinia enterocolitica infection from contaminated meat, poultry, dairy products, and seafood (especially oysters). In 2012, a consumer group found that 67% of pork sold in the U.S. was contaminated with Yersinia!!

Testing

Physicians can run blood tests, stool antigen or breath tests for H. pylori. If you cannot find a physician that will run the test for you, you can also order your own labs tests via direct to patient lab testing that we have set up through our shopping cart and third-party links on thyroidpharmacistconsulting.com/tests.

Borrelia is available as a blood test, while presence of Yersinia can be tested by a comprehensive stool analysis by requesting Yersinia to be added to the test panel.

Treating Infections

New autoimmune theories have established that once the antigen (trigger) is removed, the antibody production goes away and the innocent part of our bodies (in the case of Hashimoto’s, the TPO enzyme) is no longer a target.

In the case of infections, once the infection is removed, the TPO should no longer be a trigger once the immune system recognizes that the infection is gone.  Thus, treating infections may help to heal Hashimoto’s. In other cases, the infection may be gone and the immune system may need a reboot.

Antibiotics for Autoimmune Conditions?

Some individuals have reported the normalization of thyroid peroxidase antibodies following taking the antibiotic doxycycline, which is effective for Yersinia enterocolitica and borellia burgdorferi as well as other bacteria.

Work with your doctor to test for infections, and use antibiotics judiciously, as they can be incredibly dangerous when used incorrectly and lead to multi-drug resistance, an elimination of the beneficial bacterial flora and numerous side effects. There is a multitude of different antibiotics, each with a different group of bacteria they target, and each with their own set of side effects. Blindly taking antibiotics without knowing the cause of your infection may end up inadvertently destroying the beneficial bacteria while letting pathogenic and opportunistic bacteria thrive.

Be sure to supplement with probiotics during courses of antibiotic therapy, but at different times throughout the day so that the beneficial bacteria in the probiotics are not killed by the antibiotics. Work with your pharmacist to find out the half-life of your antibiotics and to find an optimal time to take probiotics.

Treatments for H. Pylori

H. pylori is a stubborn infection. Standard medical treatments for H. pylori include:

Triple therapy: Two antibiotics: Amoxicillin or Metronidazole plus Clarithromycin with a Proton Pump Inhibitor (While Proton Pump Inhibitors can make us more susceptible to H. Pylori by themselves, they work in synergy with antibiotics to reduce H. Pylori)

Quadruple therapy: Pepto Bismol + tetracycline + metronidazole + Proton Pump Inhibitor

Some individuals may be hesitant to try antibiotics… integrative clinicians have reported much success with using natural remedies like the ones listed below…

Natural Substances That Can Help Overcome Infections

Signs of Lupus in women

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), also known simply as lupus, is an autoimmune disease in which the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks healthy tissue in many parts of the body.[1] Symptoms vary between people and may be mild to severe. Common symptoms include painful and swollen joints, fever, chest pain, hair loss, mouth ulcers, swollen lymph nodes, feeling tired, and a red rash which is most commonly on the face. Often there are periods of illness, called flares, and periods of remission when there are few symptoms.[1]

The cause is not entirely clear.[1] It is believed to involve hormonal, environmental, and genetic factors.[2] Among identical twins, if one is affected there is a 24% chance the other one will be as well.[1] Female sex hormones, sunlight, smoking, vitamin D deficiency, and certain infections, are also believed to increase the risk.[2] The mechanism involves an immune response by autoantibodies against a person’s own tissues. These are most commonly anti-nuclear antibodies and they result in inflammation. Diagnosis can be difficult and is based on a combination of symptoms and laboratory tests. There are a number of other kinds of lupus erythematosus including discoid lupus erythematosus, neonatal lupus, and subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus

Epidemiology

The global rates of SLE are approximately 20-70 per 100,000 people. In females, the rate is highest between 45-64 year of age. The lowest overall rate exists in Iceland and Japan. The highest rates exist in US and France. However, there is no sufficient evidence to conclude that SLE is less common in some countries compared to others, since there is significant environmental variability in these countries. For example, different countries receive different levels of sunlight, and exposure to UV rays affects dermatological symptoms of SLE. Certain studies hypothesize that a genetic connection exists between race and lupus which affects disease prevalence. If this is true, the racial composition of countries affects disease, and will cause the incidence in a country to change as the racial makeup changes. In order to understand if this is true, countries with largely homogenous and racially stable populations should be studied to better understand incidence.[5] Rates of disease in the developing world are unclear.[6]

The rate of SLE varies between countries, ethnicity, sex, and changes over time.[87] In the United States, one estimate of the rate of SLE is 53 per 100,000;[87] other estimates range from 322,000 to over 1 million.[88] In Northern Europe the rate is about 40 per 100,000 people.[89] SLE occurs more frequently and with greater severity among those of non-European descent.[88] That rate has been found to be as high as 159 per 100,000 among those of Afro-Caribbean descent.[87] Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus generally presents between the ages of 3 and 15 and is four time more common in girls.[90]

While the onset and persistence of SLE can show disparities between genders, socioeconomic status also plays a major role. Women with SLE and of lower socioeconomic status have been shown to have higher depression scores, higher body mass index, and more restricted access to medical care than women of higher socioeconomic statuses with the illness. People with SLE had more self-reported anxiety and depression scores if they were from a lower socioeconomic status.[91]

Ethnicity

There are assertions that race affects the rate of SLE. However, a 2010 review of studies which correlate race and SLE identified several sources of systematic and methodological error, indicating that the connection between race and SLE may be spurious.[92] For example, studies show that social support is a modulating factor which buffers against SLE-related damage and maintains physiological functionality.[92] Studies have not been conducted to determine whether people of different racial backgrounds receive differing levels of social support.[92] If there is a difference, this could act as a confounding variable in studies correlating race and SLE. Another caveat to note when examining studies about SLE is that symptoms are often self-reported. This process introduces additional sources of methodological error. Studies have shown that self-reported data is affected by more than just the patients experience with the disease- social support, the level of helplessness, and abnormal illness-related behaviors also factor into a self-assessment. Additionally, other factors like the degree of social support which a person receives, socioeconomic status, health insurance, and access to care can contribute to an individual’s disease progression.[92][93] It is important to note that racial differences in lupus progression have not been found in studies that control for the socioeconomic status [SES] of participants.[92][94] Studies that control for the SES of its participants have found that non-white people have more abrupt disease onset compared to white people and that their disease progresses more quickly. Non-white patients often report more hematological, serosal, neurological, and renal symptoms. However, the severity of symptoms and mortality are both similar in white and non-white patients. Studies that report different rates of disease progression in late-stage SLE are most likely reflecting differences in socioeconomic status and the corresponding access to care.[92] The people who receive medical care often have accrued less disease-related damage and are less likely to be below the poverty line.[94] Additional studies have found that education, marital status, occupation, and income create a social context which contributes to disease progression.[92]

Sex

SLE, like many autoimmune diseases, affects females more frequently than males, at a rate of about 9 to 1.[3][87] The X chromosome carries immunological related genes, which can mutate and contribute to the onset of SLE. The Y chromosome has no identified mutations associated with autoimmune disease.[95]

Hormonal mechanisms could explain the increased incidence of SLE in females. The onset of SLE could be attributed to the elevated hydroxylation of estrogen and the abnormally decreased levels of androgens in females. In addition, differences in GnRH signalling have also shown to contribute to the onset of SLE. While females are more likely to relapse than males, the intensity of these relapses is the same for both sexes.[96]

In addition to hormonal mechanisms, specific genetic influences found on the X chromosome may also contribute to the development of SLE. Studies indicate that the X chromosome can determine the levels of sex hormones. A study has shown an association between Klinefelter syndrome and SLE. XXY males with SLE have an abnormal X-Y translocation resulting in the partial triplication of the PAR1 gene region.


Keeping Your Immune System Healthy

How do you keep the immune system active and healthy? All the books say essentially the same thing— simply by living well. And “living well” involves common sense practices such as eating a healthful diet, getting enough sleep, exercising, drinking alcohol only in moderation, and avoiding stress. A few additional tips for keeping the immune system healthy include:

  • Avoid or prevent exposure to environmental toxins such as mercury, poisons and heavy metals.
  • Avoid taking unnecessary drugs.
  • Understand that diet can influence your immune system, and choose your foods wisely.
  • Have sex. Sexual activity has been found to be good for the immune system because it activates the hormones that are regulated by the act of having sex and helps maintain a healthy hormone balance.

References

Cancer diet, ketogenic – high fat

keto diet no carbs and supplements brain cancer

How a young man delayed cancer progression with high fat and less carbs diet, ketogenic diet?

He eats and fasts. He credits his health to whole foods of greens and dietary supplements. Fats are from coconut oil, omega 3, eggs, fish oil and other veggie sources.

Sugar is food for cancer cells. He avoid sugar and carbs rich in sugar and derives his carbs from greens.