Can Alzheimer’s be prevented?

Connie B. Dellobuono
Connie B. Dellobuono, Health author and blogger at http://www.clubalthea.com and home health care organization mgt at Motherhealth LLC, bay area caregivers 408-854-1883

Alzheimer can be slowed down with nurture (massage,love,loving environment), whole foods (probiotic, sulfur rich foods), social interaction, sufficient sleep and exercise.

  • Gut microbes can be balanced with whole foods, less stress, liver detox and probiotic. Avoid sugar and amino acid alanine from red meat.
  • Brain cells need adequate sleep, exercise, learning new skills and sunshine to thrive and grow.
  • Sulfur rich foods are cleansing and so is adequate night time sleep.
  • Depression is one of the early signs of Alzheimer and social interaction can help. Limit your stress to combat its progression, Surround yourself with a loving support system and an environment close to nature.

Alzheimer’s gut bacteria, virus and iron dysregulation

Researchers Identify Virus and Two Types of Bacteria as Major Causes of Alzheimer’s

A worldwide team of senior scientists and clinicians have come together to produce an editorial which indicates that certain microbes – a specific virus and two specific types of bacteria – are major causes of Alzheimer’s Disease. Their paper, which has been published online in the highly regarded peer-reviewed journal, Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, stresses the urgent need for further research – and more importantly, for clinical trials of anti-microbial and related agents to treat the disease.

This major call for action is based on substantial published evidence into Alzheimer’s. The team’s landmark editorial summarises the abundant data implicating these microbes, but until now this work has been largely ignored or dismissed as controversial – despite the absence of evidence to the contrary. Therefore, proposals for the funding of clinical trials have been refused, despite the fact that over 400 unsuccessful clinical trials for Alzheimer’s based on other concepts were carried out over a recent 10-year period.

Opposition to the microbial concepts resembles the fierce resistance to studies some years ago which showed that viruses cause certain types of cancer, and that a bacterium causes stomach ulcers. Those concepts were ultimately proved valid, leading to successful clinical trials and the subsequent development of appropriate treatments.

Professor Douglas Kell of The University of Manchester’s School of Chemistry and Manchester Institute of Biotechnology is one of the editorial’s authors. He says that supposedly sterile red blood cells were seen to contain dormant microbes, which also has implications for blood transfusions.

“We are saying there is incontrovertible evidence that Alzheimer’s Disease has a dormant microbial component, and that this can be woken up by iron dysregulation. Removing this iron will slow down or prevent cognitive degeneration – we can’t keep ignoring all of the evidence,” Professor Douglas Kell said.

Image shows an old lady looking out of a window.

Professor Resia Pretorius of the University of Pretoria, who worked with Douglas Kell on the editorial, said “The microbial presence in blood may also play a fundamental role as causative agent of systemic inflammation, which is a characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease – particularly, the bacterial cell wall component and endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide. Furthermore, there is ample evidence that this can cause neuroinflammation and amyloid-β plaque formation.”

The findings of this editorial could also have implications for the future treatment of Parkinson’s Disease, and other progressive neurological conditions.

ABOUT THIS ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE RESEARCH

Source: University of Manchester
Image Credit: The image is adapted from the University of Manchester press release.
Original Research: Full open access editorial for “Microbes and Alzheimer’s Disease” by Itzhaki, Ruth F.; Lathe, Richard; Balin, Brian J.; Ball, Melvyn J.; Bearer, Elaine L.; Bullido, Maria J.; Carter, Chris; Clerici, Mario; Cosby, S. Louise; Field, Hugh; Fulop, Tamas; Grassi, Claudio; Griffin, W. Sue T.; Haas, Jürgen; Hudson, Alan P.; Kamer, Angela R.; Kell, Douglas B.; Licastro, Federico; Letenneur, Luc; Lövheim, Hugo; Mancuso, Roberta; Miklossy, Judith; Lagunas, Carola Otth; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Perry, George; Preston, Christopher; Pretorius, Etheresia; Strandberg, Timo; Tabet, Naji; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D.; and Whittum-Hudson, Judith A. in Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. Published online March 8 2016 doi:10.3233/JAD-160152


Abstract

Microbes and Alzheimer’s Disease

We are researchers and clinicians working on Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or related topics, and we write to express our concern that one particular aspect of the disease has been neglected, even though treatment based on it might slow or arrest AD progression. We refer to the many studies, mainly on humans, implicating specific microbes in the elderly brain, notably herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1), Chlamydia pneumoniae, and several types of spirochaete, in the etiology of AD. Fungal infection of AD brain [5, 6] has also been described, as well as abnormal microbiota in AD patient blood. The first observations of HSV1 in AD brain were reported almost three decades ago]. The ever-increasing number of these studies (now about 100 on HSV1 alone) warrants re-evaluation of the infection and AD concept.

AD is associated with neuronal loss and progressive synaptic dysfunction, accompanied by the deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, a cleavage product of the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP), and abnormal forms of tau protein, markers that have been used as diagnostic criteria for the disease. These constitute the hallmarks of AD, but whether they are causes of AD or consequences is unknown. We suggest that these are indicators of an infectious etiology. In the case of AD, it is often not realized that microbes can cause chronic as well as acute diseases; that some microbes can remain latent in the body with the potential for reactivation, the effects of which might occur years after initial infection; and that people can be infected but not necessarily affected, such that ‘controls’, even if infected, are asymptomatic

“Microbes and Alzheimer’s Disease” by Itzhaki, Ruth F.; Lathe, Richard; Balin, Brian J.; Ball, Melvyn J.; Bearer, Elaine L.; Bullido, Maria J.; Carter, Chris; Clerici, Mario; Cosby, S. Louise; Field, Hugh; Fulop, Tamas; Grassi, Claudio; Griffin, W. Sue T.; Haas, Jürgen; Hudson, Alan P.; Kamer, Angela R.; Kell, Douglas B.; Licastro, Federico; Letenneur, Luc; Lövheim, Hugo; Mancuso, Roberta; Miklossy, Judith; Lagunas, Carola Otth; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Perry, George; Preston, Christopher; Pretorius, Etheresia; Strandberg, Timo; Tabet, Naji; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D.; and Whittum-Hudson, Judith A. in Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. Published online March 8 2016 doi:10.3233/JAD-160152

Deficiencies of natural cannabinoids could result in a predisposition for depression and PTSD

Music therapy for all health issues

music thera.JPGMUSIC THERAPY IN ACTION

Music has shown positive effects in a variety of patient populations for improving symptoms related to different diseases and disorders. Here’s a sampling of some of the more common uses of music therapy.

PATIENT POPULATION NONMUSIC BEHAVIORS
Autism spectrum disorder Movement, communication, speech and language, social skills, attention, cognition, activities of daily living
Alzhteimer’s disease and dementia Memory, mood, social interaction
Traumatic brain injury Movement, communication, speech and language, social skills, attention, memory, cognition
Mental health and mood disorders Self-esteem, awareness of self and environment, expression, reality testing, social skills, attention, cognition
Pain management Anxiety and stress, mood, feelings of control
Cancer Anxiety and stress, mood, feelings of control, coping skills
Movement disorders and stroke Movement, speech and language, swallowing , respiratory control,
memory, cognition
Hospice Anxiety and stress, mood, feelings of control, coping skills

Elizabeth Stegemöller is a board-certified music therapist and neuroscientist at Iowa State University, where she studies the effects of music on movement and associated neurophysiology in persons with Parkinson’s disease.

Vitamin C and A for vision and to fight cancer and other invading organisms

guava car.JPGVitamin C (water soluble) and A (fat soluble) for vision and cancer fighting properties: both from colored fruits and veggies

Signs that you are low in Vitamin C and A is when your vision is weak and you get allergies and get tired or sick easily.

Eat Vit A (afternoon) together with good fatty foods and eat Vit C (morning) with water soluble foods. Vitamin C is important in the absorption of most minerals and nutrients in the body such as Calcium, magnesium, iron and others.

Ascorbic acid becomes widely distributed in body tissues with large concentrations found in the liver, leukocytes, platelets, glandular tissues, and the lens of the eye. In the plasma about 25% of the ascorbic acid is bound to proteins.   Ascorbic acid crosses the placenta; cord blood concentration are generally 2 to 4 times the concentration in maternal blood. Ascorbic acid is distributed into milk. In nursing mothers on a normal diet the milk contains 40 to 70 ug/mL of the vitamin.  Food Sources of Vitamin C ranked by mg of vitamin C per standard amount; also calories in the standard amount. (All provide ≥ 20% of RDA for adult men, which is 90 mg/day.)

Whole Food, Standard Amount Vitamin C (mg) Calories
Guava, raw, ½ cup 188 56
Red sweet pepper, raw, ½cup 142 20
Red sweet pepper, cooked, ½ cup   116 19
Kiwi fruit, 1 medium 70 46
Orange, raw, 1 medium 70 62
Orange juice, ¾ cup 61-93 79-84
Green pepper, sweet, raw, ½ cup 60   15
Green pepper, sweet, cooked, ½ cup 51   19
Grapefruit juice, ¾ cup 50-70 71-86
Vegetable juice cocktail, ¾ cup 50 34
Strawberries, raw, ½ cup 49 27
Brussels sprouts, cooked, ½ cup 48 28
Cantaloupe, ¼ medium 47 51
Papaya, raw, ¼ medium (strong enzyme) 47 30
Kohlrabi, cooked, ½ cup 45 24
Broccoli, raw, ½ cup 39 15
Edible pod peas, cooked, ½ cup 38 34
Broccoli, cooked, ½ cup 37 26
Sweet potato, canned, ½ cup 34   116
Tomato juice, ¾ cup 33 31
Cauliflower, cooked, ½ cup 28 17
Pineapple, raw, ½ cup 28 37
Kale, cooked, ½ cup 27 18
Mango, ½ cup 23 54

Vitamin A for growth and bone development

In humans, an exogenous source of vitamin A is required for growth (hormones and others) and bone development, vision, reproduction, and the integrity of mucosal and epithelial surfaces. In the retina, retinol is converted to the aldehyde, cis-retinal, which combines with opsin to form rhodopsin, and visual pigment. Vitamin A has been reported to act as a cofactor in various biochemical reactions including mucopolysaccharide synthesis, cholesterol synthesis, and hydroxysteroid metabolism.

Cholesterol synthesis happens during the night and so is Vitamin A. Women should especially sleep before 10pm to follow the normal body rhythm and hormone production. Cholesterol and Vitamin A are important in hormone production.

Vitamin A is essential for growth and bone development in children, for vision (particularly in dim light), and for integrity of mucosal and epithelial surfaces.

Vitamin A deficiency leads to xerophthalmia, Bitot’s spots, keratomalacia, night blindness (nyctalopia), hyperkeratosis of the skin, epithelial metaplasia of mucous membranes, and decreased resistance to infections. Administration of vitamin A completely reverses signs of vitamin deficiency unless keratomalacia has resulted in irreversible ocular damage.

Retinol inhibited the mutagenic activity of aflatoxin b1 when added to the Ames salmonella/mammalian microsome assay.

Concurrent use of vitamin E may facilitate absorption, hepatic storage, and utilization of vitamin A, and reduce toxicity; excessive doses may deplete vitamin A stores.

Concurrent use /of tetracycline/ with vitamin A 50,000 Units a day and higher has been reported to cause benign intracranial hypertension.

Vitamin A administration induces a high risk of intoxication in patients with chronic renal failure.

From epidemiological research it is argued that low vitamin A intake is associated with a higher incidence of cancer in different tissues.

Food Sources of Vitamin A ranked by micrograms Retinol Activity Equivalents (RAE) of vitamin A per standard amount; also calories in the standard amount. (All are ≥ 20% of RDA for adult men, which is 900 mg/day RAE.)

Food Sources

Whole Food, Standard Amount Vitamin A
(μg RAE)
Calories
Organ meats (liver, giblets), various, cooked, 3 oza 1490-9126 134-235
Carrot juice, ¾ cup 1692   71
Sweetpotato with peel, baked, 1 medium 1096 103
Pumpkin, canned, ½ cup (and yams are happy food) 953 42
Carrots, cooked from fresh, ½ cup 671 27
Spinach, cooked from frozen, ½ cup 573 30
Collards, cooked from frozen, ½ cup 489 31
Kale, cooked from frozen, ½ cup 478 20
Mixed vegetables, canned, ½ cup 474   40
Turnip greens, cooked from frozen, ½ cup 441 24
Instant cooked cereals, fortified, prepared, 1 packet 285-376 75-97
Various ready-to-eat cereals, with added vit. A, ~1 oz 180-376 100-117
Carrot, raw, 1 small 301 20
Beet greens, cooked, ½ cup (for hormonal balance) 276 19
Winter squash, cooked, ½ cup 268 38
Dandelion greens, cooked, ½ cup 260 18
Cantaloupe, raw, ¼ medium melon 233 46
Mustard greens, cooked, ½ cup 221 11
Pickled herring, 3 oz 219 222
Red sweet pepper, cooked, ½ cup 186 19
Chinese cabbage, cooked, ½ cup 180 10

Note: For those with thyroid problems, cooked your greens and most veggies.

How can we help our doctors understand our bodies

When health consumers communicate all important health information to doctors, health solutions can be found and matched to the person’s health care needs. Communicating to doctors thoroughly removes the guess work and backed up my diagnostics tests, each health journey can be personalized.

Happy doctor’s day! May all our doctors take care of their health too and always be there for us. May God’s light energy shine upon all doctors always.

Connie Dello Buono