Alzheimer’s gut bacteria, virus and iron dysregulation

Researchers Identify Virus and Two Types of Bacteria as Major Causes of Alzheimer’s

A worldwide team of senior scientists and clinicians have come together to produce an editorial which indicates that certain microbes – a specific virus and two specific types of bacteria – are major causes of Alzheimer’s Disease. Their paper, which has been published online in the highly regarded peer-reviewed journal, Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, stresses the urgent need for further research – and more importantly, for clinical trials of anti-microbial and related agents to treat the disease.

This major call for action is based on substantial published evidence into Alzheimer’s. The team’s landmark editorial summarises the abundant data implicating these microbes, but until now this work has been largely ignored or dismissed as controversial – despite the absence of evidence to the contrary. Therefore, proposals for the funding of clinical trials have been refused, despite the fact that over 400 unsuccessful clinical trials for Alzheimer’s based on other concepts were carried out over a recent 10-year period.

Opposition to the microbial concepts resembles the fierce resistance to studies some years ago which showed that viruses cause certain types of cancer, and that a bacterium causes stomach ulcers. Those concepts were ultimately proved valid, leading to successful clinical trials and the subsequent development of appropriate treatments.

Professor Douglas Kell of The University of Manchester’s School of Chemistry and Manchester Institute of Biotechnology is one of the editorial’s authors. He says that supposedly sterile red blood cells were seen to contain dormant microbes, which also has implications for blood transfusions.

“We are saying there is incontrovertible evidence that Alzheimer’s Disease has a dormant microbial component, and that this can be woken up by iron dysregulation. Removing this iron will slow down or prevent cognitive degeneration – we can’t keep ignoring all of the evidence,” Professor Douglas Kell said.

Image shows an old lady looking out of a window.

Professor Resia Pretorius of the University of Pretoria, who worked with Douglas Kell on the editorial, said “The microbial presence in blood may also play a fundamental role as causative agent of systemic inflammation, which is a characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease – particularly, the bacterial cell wall component and endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide. Furthermore, there is ample evidence that this can cause neuroinflammation and amyloid-β plaque formation.”

The findings of this editorial could also have implications for the future treatment of Parkinson’s Disease, and other progressive neurological conditions.

ABOUT THIS ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE RESEARCH

Source: University of Manchester
Image Credit: The image is adapted from the University of Manchester press release.
Original Research: Full open access editorial for “Microbes and Alzheimer’s Disease” by Itzhaki, Ruth F.; Lathe, Richard; Balin, Brian J.; Ball, Melvyn J.; Bearer, Elaine L.; Bullido, Maria J.; Carter, Chris; Clerici, Mario; Cosby, S. Louise; Field, Hugh; Fulop, Tamas; Grassi, Claudio; Griffin, W. Sue T.; Haas, Jürgen; Hudson, Alan P.; Kamer, Angela R.; Kell, Douglas B.; Licastro, Federico; Letenneur, Luc; Lövheim, Hugo; Mancuso, Roberta; Miklossy, Judith; Lagunas, Carola Otth; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Perry, George; Preston, Christopher; Pretorius, Etheresia; Strandberg, Timo; Tabet, Naji; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D.; and Whittum-Hudson, Judith A. in Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. Published online March 8 2016 doi:10.3233/JAD-160152


Abstract

Microbes and Alzheimer’s Disease

We are researchers and clinicians working on Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or related topics, and we write to express our concern that one particular aspect of the disease has been neglected, even though treatment based on it might slow or arrest AD progression. We refer to the many studies, mainly on humans, implicating specific microbes in the elderly brain, notably herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1), Chlamydia pneumoniae, and several types of spirochaete, in the etiology of AD. Fungal infection of AD brain [5, 6] has also been described, as well as abnormal microbiota in AD patient blood. The first observations of HSV1 in AD brain were reported almost three decades ago]. The ever-increasing number of these studies (now about 100 on HSV1 alone) warrants re-evaluation of the infection and AD concept.

AD is associated with neuronal loss and progressive synaptic dysfunction, accompanied by the deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, a cleavage product of the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP), and abnormal forms of tau protein, markers that have been used as diagnostic criteria for the disease. These constitute the hallmarks of AD, but whether they are causes of AD or consequences is unknown. We suggest that these are indicators of an infectious etiology. In the case of AD, it is often not realized that microbes can cause chronic as well as acute diseases; that some microbes can remain latent in the body with the potential for reactivation, the effects of which might occur years after initial infection; and that people can be infected but not necessarily affected, such that ‘controls’, even if infected, are asymptomatic

“Microbes and Alzheimer’s Disease” by Itzhaki, Ruth F.; Lathe, Richard; Balin, Brian J.; Ball, Melvyn J.; Bearer, Elaine L.; Bullido, Maria J.; Carter, Chris; Clerici, Mario; Cosby, S. Louise; Field, Hugh; Fulop, Tamas; Grassi, Claudio; Griffin, W. Sue T.; Haas, Jürgen; Hudson, Alan P.; Kamer, Angela R.; Kell, Douglas B.; Licastro, Federico; Letenneur, Luc; Lövheim, Hugo; Mancuso, Roberta; Miklossy, Judith; Lagunas, Carola Otth; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Perry, George; Preston, Christopher; Pretorius, Etheresia; Strandberg, Timo; Tabet, Naji; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D.; and Whittum-Hudson, Judith A. in Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. Published online March 8 2016 doi:10.3233/JAD-160152

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LONG TERM CAFFEINE USE WORSENS ALZHEIMER’S SYMPTOMS

EMF and Diabetes

During the last 3 Sundays, I have been jogging and walking bare feet in Santa Cruz beach, California. I believe in nature’s help in grounding, releasing negative charges in our bodies. Email motherhealth@gmail.com if you have any research related to EMF, Diabetes and other health issues to find the root cause and empower others to a healthy body.

Connie

Dr. Magda Havas, PhD » Diabetes and Electrosensitivity

March 2010. If you have difficulty regulating your blood sugar and you are electrically sensitive you may have type 3 diabetes according to research published in the Journal Electromagnetic Biology and Medicine in 2008. Unlike Type 1 diabetes (juvenile diabetes) that is largely genetically controlled, and Type 2 diabetes …

Diabetes and EMFs | Cause of Diabetes | Type 3 Diabetes – EarthCalm

exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMFs). … Dr. Havas’s study concludes that many diabetics may be electrically-sensitive, a condition which may cause increased blood sugar in their tests. … No matter what type of Diabetes you have, you will benefit from EMF protection.

Could EMFs Cause Diabetes? – ElectricSense

Jan 13, 2011 – Studies show that diabetes can be triggered by exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMFs). It causes Type 3 diabetes. Learn the principal causes and solutions.

[PDF]Diabetes and ElectroMagnetic Fields: the evidence – Next-up

a connection between the increase in diabetes and EMF exposure, but also the effectiveness of filters on ELF electrical equipment that help to reduce the suffering and the symptoms of diabetics. “We can take a diabetic person and put them in an environment polluted by EMR and measure their sugar levels,” she explained …

Electromagnetic Fields Can Worsen Diabetes – Real Diabetes Truth …

Aug 29, 2013 – There is mounting evidence that electromagnetic fields (EMF) from the electronic equipment that constantly surrounds us are bad for our health.

EMF and Diabetes | eatgenius

eatgenius.com › Bites

Mar 17, 2017 – EMF is a risk factor for diabetes and affects diabetes management.

DoH: EMF and Diabetes / Cell Phone Radiation Standards – Institute …

geopathology-za.wikidot.com › … › Department of Health

Please WAKE-UP !!! Minister of Health and Minister of Environment !!! – Please WAKE-UP, now !!!**. Electromagnetic Fields lead to Diabetic Disasters – and not only THAT !!! See: http://www.naturalnews.com/029328_diabetes_electromagnetic_pollution.html. Talking about certain PROBLEMS does not help much, unless you …

EMF / EMR and type 3 Diabetes | Life Energy Designs

Diabetes can be caused by EMF / EMR exposure. This is the conclusion of the latest peer-reviewed research by Dr. Magda Havas PhD. In sensitive people, which she classifies as having type 3 diabetesor environmentally triggered diabetes, exposure to dirty electricity (EMF/EMR) is enough to send their blood sugar high.

Dirty electricity elevates blood sugar among electrically sensitive …

by M Havas – ‎2008 – ‎Cited by 54 – ‎Related articles

Electromagn Biol Med. 2008;27(2):135-46. doi: 10.1080/15368370802072075. Dirty electricity elevates blood sugar among electrically sensitive diabetics and may explain brittle diabetes. Havas M(1). Author information: (1)Environmental & Resource Studies, Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario, Canada.

Electromagnetic Fields Lead to Diabetic Disasters – NaturalNews.com

Jul 31, 2010 – (NewsTarget) In recent years, many of us have grown increasingly aware of the possible dangers posed by Electromagnetic Fields (EMFs) [1]. As electrical and wireless applications continue to become more ubiquitous in society, so our exposure to EMFs continues to climb. Although low levels of natural …

Physical inactivity, dopamine, lactate , glucose and aging

aging exerAfter 96 years of age, he has crying spells in the afternoon or early evening hours when our brain hormones are slowing down to ready for sleep.  With less exercise and more time sitting down watching TV and eating every 2 hours, he forgets to remember things as his brain and muscles are not working as it should when he was young.  Whenever I see him, I give him a hug and trains other caregivers to hug him more. He perks up and can do more walking.

Hugging can increase the production of dopamine in your brain, and this can be seen in PET scans of the brain. Dopamine levels are low in people with conditions like Parkinsonism and mood disorders like Depression.

So if you see someone depressed, give him a hug, and bring a little joy to their life.
Dopamine levels are low to those with Alzheimer and Parkinson’s diseases.
Dopamine containing neurons control  voluntary movements. The association with a physiologically reduced glutamate release from frontal and prefrontal cortices, hippocampi and amygdala would induce further decrease of Dopamine release, inducing hypo-activity, gait disturbances and decline of executive functions.

The earlier the impairment of Dopamine system occurs, the fastest the cognitive decline goes.

Hormones and nuerotransmitters dopamine, norepinephrine and epinephrine are responsible for our emotions and affects our memory and muscles causing Alzheimer and Parkinson’s disease.
In the brain, dopamine functions as a neurotransmitter—a chemical released by neurons (nerve cells) to send signals to other nerve cells. The brain includes several distinct dopamine pathways, one of which plays a major role in the motivational component of reward-motivated behavior.
Epinephrine, also called adrenaline, hormone that is secreted mainly by the medulla of the adrenal glands and that functions primarily to increase cardiac output and to raise glucose levels in the blood.
Norepinephrine, also called noradrenaline, substance that is released predominantly from the ends of sympathetic nerve fibers and that acts to increase the force of skeletal muscle contraction and the rate and force of contraction of the heart.

Supplements and Nutrition

Eat happy foods: eggs, colorful whole foods and yams and whole foods/dietary supplements rich in the following nutrients:
Folate, Vitamin B complex, SAM-E,omega 3, digestive enzymes, probiotic, Vitamin C, copper, iron from greens, NAC
Suggested exercises should include walking, dancing , stretching, yoga, meditation, and other body movement.
Remember all the above information assumes that you have a healthy liver. Take care of the laboratory organ of your body, the liver which processes all chemicals, drugs, alcohol and nutrition in your body.
During sleep, your brain is helping the liver detox your body. The lymphatic system which travels opposite your circulatory system is responsible for cleaning your blood.

Lactate and brain

Lactate is considered an important metabolite in the human body, but there has been considerable debate about its roles in brain function. Research in recent years has suggested that lactate from astrocytes may be crucial for supporting axonal function, especially during times of high metabolic demands or hypoglycemia. The astrocyte-neuron lactate transfer shuttle system serves a protective function to ensure a supply of substrates for brain metabolism, and oligodendrocytes appear to also influence availability of lactate. There is increasing evidence for lactate acting as a signaling molecule in the brain to link metabolism, substrate availability, blood flow and neuronal activity.
The brain produces its own lactate from the metabolism of glycogen and tends to export lactate at rest []. Lactate is brought into the brain across the BBB to be used as fuel when plasma lactate is high or plasma glucose is low [].