Vitamin C for bones and video exercises for stronger bones for older adults

  • Did you know that a diet low in fruits and vegetables is linked to higher rates of frailty as you age? Or that as you age, your need for calories declines, but your need for nutrients increases?

  • Eat foods rich in Vitamin C for healthy bones. Vitamin C assists in the formation of collagen. … Collagen is abundant in the connective tissue of cartilage and bone — in fact, it makes up about 30% of ourbones, serving as a support structure for mineral deposits and giving bone its resilience.
  • Easy exercises that let you stay active without causing joint pain. See video below
  • The vitamin that may make you less likely to break a hip.Vitamin C
  • Relief for 8 common causes of foot pain — including bunions, hammertoes, and plantar fasciitis. Use oil of almond and add fresh ginger and rosemary essential oils.
  • Exercises that help keep you from twisting your ankle with proper shoes selection
  • The device that could keep you from breaking bones and losing your independence
  • How to increase muscle power to boost your balance and lower your risk of falling? stretching and leg exercises, potassium and Vitamin C for energy
  • Where to put lights, grab bars, and more so you can stay in your own home: in hallway, bathroom, bedroom…

 

9:17

Famous Physical Therapist’s Bob Schrupp and Brad Heineck present three of their favorite exercises for people with osteoporosis …

2:54

Strengthening exercises for osteoporosis patients need to be done safely with doctor’s permission. Hold onto a chair with your …

12:14

“Famous” Physical Therapists Bob Schrupp and Brad Heineck presnet the 10 Best Exercises for Osteoporosis or “Weak Bones“.

11:09

Here is the reference list for the articles used to create this presentation. 1. Giangregorio, L., Papaioannou, A., Macintyre, N., Ashe, …

8:32

http://www.StrongerSeniors.com/ #ExerciseForSeniors Seniors Chair Aerobics- This clip focuses on the lower body. This Chair …

1:14

Vicki Doe Fitness-Health expert: Gabe Sanders PhD, NSCA-CSCS- Using light weights or resistance bands are much safer for …

1:30

In a world-first trial, Brisbane scientists have found weight training can prevent bone fractures in people suffering from …

11:16

“Famous” Physical Therapists Bob Schrupp and Brad Heineck demonstrate 7 exercises to help seniorsimprove their balance and …

6:18

Fitness at Any Age: Regardless of Age, Weight or Athletic Ability ISBN-13: 978-1515067214 Physical activity, along with proper …

5:09

Vivian Goldschmidt, founder of http://saveourbones.com, shows you a little-known osteoporosis exercise that she unearthed …

7:26

Osteoporosis exercises for hip strengthening with Physiotherapist Michelle Kenway from http://www.pelvicexercises.com.au Learn …

2:37

Fitness for Senior Citizen – http://jennyjordan.com.au/fitness-for-senior-citizen.html …

1:49

Physical health promotion in the elderly population- University of Western Ontario. CTF nursing program. IMPORTANT: Consult a …

2:15

Mary started exercising at the age of 70 after she learned that she had osteoporosis. Learn more about Osteoporosis at: …

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Massage and caregiving services for bay area seniors

Motherhealth caregivers provide comfort and health monitoring to home bound bay area seniors. As we massage the aching bodies of seniors who are mostly bed-bound , we also give a hug and loving words. Most seniors are alone and need hugs and loving touch.

Even a trumpist who is bed ridden became soft and warm hearted upon receiving massage from Motherhealth caregivers who are from all walks of life (older, Filipina, African Americans, Ethiopians, retired, health care pros, CNAs, healers, massage therapists).

Text 408-854-1883 for prompt response of your caregiving needs or email motherhealth@gmail.com

caregiver ad

Caregivers and caregiving agencies helping seniors, be added in our list

We care creating a list of caregivers and caregiving agencies per city, per state and per country.

We should find a way to help seniors and older adults in need of in home non medical care. This will save them time and money, than spending more days in hospitals , rehab or nursing facilities.

With one on one care, a patient and caring companion or caregiver can bring more energy to a senior needing extra loving care and hugs.

More and more seniors live up to 100 years of age because they have a friend, confidant and one who gives them a hug and massage.

The list of helpers should not be limited to the bay area but must also include other cities.

So if you would like to “get the word out” to hundreds of thousands of families across America (in a cost effective way) about your expertise in in-home health care for home-bound seniors or older adults with Alzheimer, Dementia, Diabetes, Stroke, Parkinson’s and other health issues that they need 24/7 care with a companion to assist them at home, in nursing homes or other facilities, then add your info here:

How to find calmness , a caregiver at your side

calm finds me

Email motherhealth@gmail.com on how to find calmness in your life.

Anxiety is the number one health issue of seniors.

We ensure that they are calm. We give them good sleep, massage, whole foods and a companion they can trust. But at times, they could not sleep. Melatonin have helped them.

For most bay area seniors, they worry about the house they left behind since they are now living in a care home for seniors.

For those who live alone, they worry about sales calls, sales people knocking on their door, their finances and many other worries.

We help remove some of these anxieties for seniors in the bay area who need assistance in daily living , a caregiver or home helper. Cities we serve for non medical in home caregiving includes Atherton, Los Altos, Palo Alto, Peninsula, Santa Clara county, Saratoga, Los Gatos and nearby cities.

 

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Alter your life by altering your attitude

alter your life

My 21 yr old daughter over heard her dad saying the possibility of a scary scenario when in jail just by wearing pajama while driving. She said that is so negative mom and I’m glad you are not living here to hear that always.

Being positive in life will bring you good health. I have seen many seniors living in their 90s and even 100s and they are always happy and walking. Their memory might not be complete but they can walk and are always happy.

We take care of bay area seniors and provide happiness and companionship to them to live a quality life.

All cities are served by our caregivers for in home senior health care and support and referrals to care homes and nursing homes: Atherton, Menlo Park, Santa Clara county, Los Altos, Saratoga, Mountain View, Peninsula and San Mateo.

A care team involved more than 3 people who monitors the caregivers and clients.

Massage, help with exercise, light housekeeping, cooking, driving and assistance in daily living are part of the job.

And treating each client like family is important.

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Early synapse loss to Alzheimer’s disease

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microglia

Structure of a typical chemical synapse

In the nervous system, a synapse[1] is a structure that permits a neuron (or nerve cell) to pass an electrical or chemical signal to another neuron or to the target efferent cell.

Santiago Ramón y Cajal proposed that neurons are not continuous throughout the body, yet still communicate with each other, an idea known as the neuron doctrine.[2] The word “synapse” – from the Greek synapsis (συνάψις), meaning “conjunction”, in turn from συνάπτεὶν (συν (“together”) and ἅπτειν (“to fasten”)) – was introduced in 1897 by the English neurophysiologist Charles Sherringtonin Michael Foster‘s Textbook of Physiology.[1] Sherrington struggled to find a good term that emphasized a union between two separate elements, and the actual term “synapse” was suggested by the English classical scholar Arthur Woollgar Verrall, a friend of Michael Foster.[3][4]Some authors generalize the concept of the synapse to include the communication from a neuron to any other cell type,[5] such as to a motor cell, although such non-neuronal contacts may be referred to as junctions (a historically older term).

Synapses are essential to neuronal function: neurons are cells that are specialized to pass signals to individual target cells, and synapses are the means by which they do so. At a synapse, the plasma membrane of the signal-passing neuron (the presynaptic neuron) comes into close apposition with the membrane of the target (postsynaptic) cell. Both the presynaptic and postsynaptic sites contain extensive arrays of a molecular machinery that link the two membranes together and carry out the signaling process. In many synapses, the presynaptic part is located on an axon and the postsynaptic part is located on a dendrite or somaAstrocytes also exchange information with the synaptic neurons, responding to synaptic activity and, in turn, regulating neurotransmission.[6] Synapses (at least chemical synapses) are stabilized in position by synaptic adhesion molecules (SAMs) projecting from both the pre- and post-synaptic neuron and sticking together where they overlap; SAMs may also assist in the generation and functioning of synapses.[7]

Chemical or electrical

An example of chemical synapse by the release of neurotransmitters like acetylcholine or glutamic acid.

There are two fundamentally different types of synapses:

  • In a chemical synapse, electrical activity in the presynaptic neuron is converted (via the activation of voltage-gated calcium channels) into the release of a chemical called a neurotransmitter that binds to receptors located in the plasma membrane of the postsynaptic cell. The neurotransmitter may initiate an electrical response or a secondary messenger pathway that may either excite or inhibit the postsynaptic neuron. Chemical synapses can be classified according to the neurotransmitter released: glutamatergic (often excitatory), GABAergic (often inhibitory), cholinergic (e.g. vertebrate neuromuscular junction), and adrenergic (releasing norepinephrine). Because of the complexity of receptor signal transduction, chemical synapses can have complex effects on the postsynaptic cell.
  • In an electrical synapse, the presynaptic and postsynaptic cell membranes are connected by special channels called gap junctions or synaptic cleft that are capable of passing an electric current, causing voltage changes in the presynaptic cell to induce voltage changes in the postsynaptic cell. The main advantage of an electrical synapse is the rapid transfer of signals from one cell to the next.[8]

Synaptic communication is distinct from an ephaptic coupling, in which communication between neurons occurs via indirect electric fields.

An autapse is a chemical or electrical synapse that forms when the axon of one neuron synapses onto dendrites of the same neuron.

Types of interfaces

Synapses can be classified by the type of cellular structures serving as the pre- and post-synaptic components. The vast majority of synapses in the mammalian nervous system are classical axo-dendritic synapses (axon synapsing upon a dendrite), however, a variety of other arrangements exist. These include but are not limited to axo-axonic, dendro-dendritic, axo-secretory, somato-dendritic, dendro-somatic, and somato-somatic synapses.

The axon can synapse onto a dendrite, onto a cell body, or onto another axon or axon terminal, as well as into the bloodstream or diffusely into the adjacent nervous tissue.

Different types of synapses

Role in memory

It is widely accepted that the synapse plays a role in the formation of memory. As neurotransmitters activate receptors across the synaptic cleft, the connection between the two neurons is strengthened when both neurons are active at the same time, as a result of the receptor’s signaling mechanisms. The strength of two connected neural pathways is thought to result in the storage of information, resulting in memory. This process of synaptic strengthening is known as long-term potentiation.[9]

By altering the release of neurotransmitters, the plasticity of synapses can be controlled in the presynaptic cell. The postsynaptic cell can be regulated by altering the function and number of its receptors. Changes in postsynaptic signaling are most commonly associated with a N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR)-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) due to the influx of calcium into the post-synaptic cell, which are the most analyzed forms of plasticity at excitatory synapses.[10]

Study models

For technical reasons, synaptic structure and function have been historically studied at unusually large model synapses, for example:

Synaptic polarization

The function of neurons depends upon cell polarity. The distinctive structure of nerve cells allows action potentials to travel directionally (from dendrites to cell body down the axon), and for these signals to then be received and carried on by post-synaptic neurons or received by effector cells. Nerve cells have long been used as models for cellular polarization, and of particular interest are the mechanisms underlying the polarized localization of synaptic molecules. PIP2 signaling regulated by IMPase plays an integral role in synaptic polarity.

Phosphoinositides (PIP, PIP2, and PIP3) are molecules that have been shown to affect neuronal polarity.[12] A gene (ttx-7) was identified in Caenorhabditis elegans that encodes myo-inositol monophosphatase (IMPase), an enzyme that produces inositol by dephosphorylating inositol phosphate. Organisms with mutant ttx-7 genes demonstrated behavioral and localization defects, which were rescued by expression of IMPase. This led to the conclusion that IMPase is required for the correct localization of synaptic protein components.[13][14] The egl-8 gene encodes a homolog of phospholipase Cβ (PLCβ), an enzyme that cleaves PIP2. When ttx-7 mutants also had a mutant egl-8 gene, the defects caused by the faulty ttx-7 gene were largely reversed. These results suggest that PIP2 signaling establishes polarized localization of synaptic components in living neurons.[13]