CBD oil

I’m testing CBD oil for some of our seniors with pain.

CBD oil is made by extracting CBD from the cannabis plant, then diluting it with a carrier oil like coconut or hemp seed oil. It’s gaining momentum in the health and wellness world, with some scientific studies confirming it may ease symptoms of ailments like chronic pain and anxiety.

Get your CBD oil related products here, globally and have your own store too.

https://www.winwithmdc.com/cp29/Motherhealth

 

CBD oil is made by extracting CBD from the cannabis plant, then diluting it with a carrier oil like coconut or hemp seed oil. It’s gaining momentum in the health and wellness world, with some scientific studies confirming it may ease symptoms of ailments like chronic pain and anxiety.

 

 

Balance your Serotonin, Dopamine and Endorphins with Happy foods

dopa ser.JPGPain and itch are influenced by two chemicals , Serotonin and Dopamine. Eat the following whole foods to balance Serotonin, Dopamine and Endorphins and do get a hug too.  Hugging can increase the production of dopamine in your brain.  Endorphins are endogenous opioid neuropeptides and peptide hormones in humans and other animals. They are produced by the central nervous system and the pituitary gland.  Scratching an itch causes minor pain, which prompts the brain to release serotonin. But serotonin also reacts with receptors on neurons that carry itch signals to the brain, making itching worse.  It has been observed that the release of the neurotransmitter dopamine stimulates this brain center to feel pleasure in “peak experiences,” such as from solving a difficult problem.

Raw pumpkin seeds
Spirulina
Raw spinach
Sesame seeds
Raw almonds
Bananas
Raw dried dates
Oats
Watercress
Sunflower seeds
Horseradish
Pumpkin leaves
Turnip greens
Cacao
Buckwheat
Millet

All of the above are geared toward a vegan diet and they all offer the perfect balance to help enhance your mood through the natural production of serotonin.

Non-vegans may add:

Mussels
Lobsters
Eggs
Cottage cheese
Turkey

aym pumpkin 4aym pumpkin 3aym pumpkin 2aym pumpkin

 

Music therapy for all health issues

music thera.JPGMUSIC THERAPY IN ACTION

Music has shown positive effects in a variety of patient populations for improving symptoms related to different diseases and disorders. Here’s a sampling of some of the more common uses of music therapy.

PATIENT POPULATION NONMUSIC BEHAVIORS
Autism spectrum disorder Movement, communication, speech and language, social skills, attention, cognition, activities of daily living
Alzhteimer’s disease and dementia Memory, mood, social interaction
Traumatic brain injury Movement, communication, speech and language, social skills, attention, memory, cognition
Mental health and mood disorders Self-esteem, awareness of self and environment, expression, reality testing, social skills, attention, cognition
Pain management Anxiety and stress, mood, feelings of control
Cancer Anxiety and stress, mood, feelings of control, coping skills
Movement disorders and stroke Movement, speech and language, swallowing , respiratory control,
memory, cognition
Hospice Anxiety and stress, mood, feelings of control, coping skills

Elizabeth Stegemöller is a board-certified music therapist and neuroscientist at Iowa State University, where she studies the effects of music on movement and associated neurophysiology in persons with Parkinson’s disease.

Healing tips, arthritis, skin, digestive and stress issues

My first video this 2018 is taken from page 1 of my upcoming ebook, Healing from within with the last 3 slides containing tips on arthritis, stress, skin and digestive issues.

Brain can suppress feelings of chronic pain when hungry

Being Hungry Turns Off Perception of Chronic Pain

Summary: Researchers report the brain can suppress feelings of chronic pain when mice are hungry.

Source: University of Pennsylvania.

Pain can be valuable. Without it, we might let our hand linger on a hot stove, for example. But longer-lasting pain, such as the inflammatory pain that can arise after injury, can be debilitating and costly, preventing us from completing important tasks. In natural settings, the lethargy triggered by such pain could even hinder survival.

According to research by University of Pennsylvania neuroscientists, the brain has a way to suppress chronic pain when an animal is hungry, allowing it to go look for food while leaving intact the response to acute pain. Their work pinpointed a tiny population of 300 brain cells responsible for the ability to prioritize hunger over chronic pain, a group of neurons that may offer targets for novel pain therapies.

“In neuroscience we’re very good about studying one behavior at a time,” says J. Nicholas Betley, an assistant professor of biology in Penn’s School of Arts and Sciences. “My lab studies hunger, and we can find neurons that make you hungry and manipulate those neurons and monitor their activity. But in the real world, things aren’t that simple. You’re not in an isolated situation where you’re only hungry. This research was to try to understand how an animal integrates multiple needs to come to a behavioral conclusion that is optimal.”

“We didn’t set out having this expectation that hunger would influence pain sensation so significantly,” says Alhadeff, “but when we saw these behaviors unfold before us, it made sense. If you’re an animal, it doesn’t matter if you have an injury, you need to be able to overcome that in order to go find the nutrients you need to survive.”

The work will be published in the journal Cell. Betley and Alhadeff collaborated with Zhenwei Su, Elen Hernandez, Michelle L. Klima, and Sophie Z. Phillips of Penn Arts and Sciences; Ruby A. Holland and Bart C. De Jonghe of Penn’s School of Nursing; and Caiying Guo and Adam W. Hantman of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

Betley’s lab has focused on studying hunger, in particular how hunger can alter perception. Curious about how hunger may interact with the sensation of pain, the researchers observed how mice that hadn’t eaten for 24 hours responded to either acute pain or longer-term inflammatory pain, which is thought to involve sensitization of neural circuits in the brain.

The Penn team found that hungry mice still responded to sources of acute pain but seemed less responsive to inflammatory pain than their well-fed counterparts. Their behavior was similar to that of mice that had been given an anti-inflammatory painkiller.

In a conditioning experiment, the researchers found that hungry mice did not avoid a place where they had been exposed to inflammatory pain, while mice that were not hungry avoided the place.

That left the question of what part of the brain was processing this intersection between hunger and pain. To find out, the researchers experimentally turned on a group of neurons known to be activated by hunger, agouti-related protein (AgRP) neurons, and found that chronic pain responses subsided, while acute pain responses stayed intact.

To get more specific about the brain region involved, the team next looked at which subpopulation of AgRP neurons appeared to integrate the signals of hunger with inflammatory pain. Activating each AgRP neuron subpopulation one at a time, Betley, Alhadeff, and colleagues found that stimulation of only a few hundred AgRP neurons that project to the parabrachial nucleus significantly suppressed inflammatory pain.

“It was really striking,” Alhadeff says. “We showed that acute response to pain was perfectly intact, but inflammatory pain was suppressed to a very significant extent.”

“The really interesting thing to my mind is that out of a brain of billions of neurons, this specific behavior is mediated by 300 or so neurons,” Betley says.

Further experiments pinpointed the neurotransmitter, a molecule called NPY, responsible for selectively blocking inflammatory pain responses. Blocking receptors for NPY reversed the effects of hunger, and pain returned.

The researchers are excited by the potential clinical relevance of their findings. If they hold up in humans, this neural circuit offers a target for ameliorating the chronic pain that can linger after injuries, a type of pain that is currently often addressed by opioid medications, drugs that also inhibit acute pain.

“We don’t want to shut off pain altogether,” Alhadeff says, “there are adaptive reasons for pain, but it would be great to be able to target just the inflammatory pain.”

pain

Taking the next steps in this line of work, the researchers would like to map out in greater depth how the brain processes inflammatory pain, ideally identifying more targets for suppressing it. And they will continue considering how different survival behaviors integrate in the brain and how the brain processes and prioritizes them.

“We’ve initiated a new way of thinking about how behavior is prioritized,” Betley says. “It’s not that all the information is funneled up to your higher thinking centers in the brain but that there’s a hierarchy, a competition that occurs between different drives, that occurs before something like pain is even perceived.”

ABOUT THIS NEUROSCIENCE RESEARCH ARTICLE

Funding: The study was supported by Penn’s School of Arts and Sciences, the American Heart Association, the Whitehall Foundation, and the National Institutes of Health (grants DG33400158, DK114104, DK731436, DK112561, and DK112812.)

Source: Katherine Unger Baillie – University of Pennsylvania
Publisher: Organized by NeuroscienceNews.com.
Image Source: NeuroscienceNews.com image is in the public domain.
Original Research: Open access research in Cell.
doi:10.1016/j.cell.2018.02.057

CITE THIS NEUROSCIENCENEWS.COM ARTICLE
University of Pennsylvania “Being Hungry Turns Off Perception of Chronic Pain.” NeuroscienceNews. NeuroscienceNews, 22 March 2018.
<http://neurosciencenews.com/hunger-pain-perception-8672/&gt;.

Abstract

A Neural Circuit for the Suppression of Pain by a Competing Need State

Highlights
•Hunger attenuates inflammatory pain without influencing acute pain responses
•Hunger-sensitive AgRP neurons projecting to the PBN suppress inflammatory pain
•Neuropeptide Y signaling in the PBN attenuates inflammatory pain during hunger

Summary
Hunger and pain are two competing signals that individuals must resolve to ensure survival. However, the neural processes that prioritize conflicting survival needs are poorly understood. We discovered that hunger attenuates behavioral responses and affective properties of inflammatory pain without altering acute nociceptive responses. This effect is centrally controlled, as activity in hunger-sensitive agouti-related protein (AgRP)-expressing neurons abrogates inflammatory pain. Systematic analysis of AgRP projection subpopulations revealed that the neural processing of hunger and inflammatory pain converge in the hindbrain parabrachial nucleus (PBN). Strikingly, activity in AgRP → PBN neurons blocked the behavioral response to inflammatory pain as effectively as hunger or analgesics. The anti-nociceptive effect of hunger is mediated by neuropeptide Y (NPY) signaling in the PBN. By investigating the intersection between hunger and pain, we have identified a neural circuit that mediates competing survival needs and uncovered NPY Y1 receptor signaling in the PBN as a target for pain suppression.

How a Combination of Exercise and Music Help Us Feel Less Pain

Jymmin: How a Combination of Exercise and Music Help Us Feel Less Pain

Summary: Jymmin, a system that mixes working out on exercise equipment and free musical improvisation, may make us less sensitive to pain, researchers report.

Source: Max Planck Institute.

Often, pain emerges as a consequence of disease, injury or intense physical demands. About seven per cent of adults in Germany experience chronic pain and feel constrained by it. There are several options to help manage this. A new alternative to painkillers or heat therapy could be Jymmin, a mixture of working out on gym machines and free musical improvisation, jamming, developed by scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences (MPI CBS) in Leipzig. They found out that this new fitness technology makes us less sensitive to pain.

In Jymmin, fitness machines are modified in a way that movement strength on the abdominal trainer, pull bar or stepper creates a wide range of sounds. Software for music composition developed at MPI CBS and a related sensor system enable users to produce a unique accompaniment from each fitness machine. The exerciser becomes the composer and the machines their instruments.

“We found that Jymmin increases the pain threshold. On average, participants were able to tolerate ten per cent more pain from just ten minutes of exercise on our Jymmin machines, some of them even up to fifty per cent”, says Thomas Fritz, head of research group Music Evoked Brain Plasticity at MPI CBS. From previous studies the neuroscientist already knew that sports in general increases our pain threshold. “Jymmin showed these effects to be even stronger compared to normal workouts”, Fritz states. After Jymmin, the participants were able to immerse their forearm into ice water of one degree Celsius for five seconds longer compared to a conventional exercise session.

Scientists working with Fritz think one of the main reasons for this might be the increased release of endorphins: the higher their level, the more tolerant we are to pain. The combination of physical exertion and making music seems to trigger the release of endorphins in a particularly efficient way.

Interestingly, the effect size was dependent on the individual experience of pain. The scientists had divided the twenty-two participants according to how they rated pain. Indeed, the participants with the highest pain threshold benefitted the most from this training method. This could be due to their already more effective release of endorphins in comparison to those who are more pain sensitive.

people exercising

“There are several possible applications for Jymmin that can be derived from these findings”, the neuroscientist says. It could help alleviate pain in sufferers of acute or chronic pain, for example. These machines could especially deliver valuable support in rehabilitation clinics by enabling more efficient training. “Patients simply reach their pain threshold later.” A current study with chronic pain patients furthermore seems to imply that Jymmin can also reduce anxiety, a contributor to chronic pain.

On the other hand there are top athletes who strive to achieve highly demanding physical performances and want to increase their pain thresholds. Preliminary investigations on top swimmers in South Korea showed that athletes who warmed up using Jymmin machines were faster than those using conventional methods. In a pilot test, five of six athletes swam faster than in previous runs.

Several former studies have demonstrated that Jymmin has many positive effects on our well-being. They revealed that not only is less effort in sports and exercise required to reach the same result, but also that personal mood and motivation is improved. Even the music itself–produced by their Jymmin–was perceived as pleasant, even if not described as their personal music taste.

ABOUT THIS NEUROSCIENCE RESEARCH ARTICLE

Source: Verena Mueller – Max Planck Institute
Publisher: Organized by NeuroscienceNews.com.
Image Source: NeuroscienceNews.com image is credited to Max Planck Institute For Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences.
Original Research: Open access research in Frontiers in Psychology.
doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2017.02312

CITE THIS NEUROSCIENCENEWS.COM ARTICLE
Max Planck Institute “Jymmin: How a Combination of Exercise and Music Help Us Feel Less Pain.” NeuroscienceNews. NeuroscienceNews, 20 February 2018.
<http://neurosciencenews.com/jymmin-exercise-music-pain-8526/&gt;.

Abstract

Musical Agency during Physical Exercise Decreases Pain

Objectives: When physical exercise is systematically coupled to music production, exercisers experience improvements in mood, reductions in perceived effort, and enhanced muscular efficiency. The physiology underlying these positive effects remains unknown. Here we approached the investigation of how such musical agency may stimulate the release of endogenous opioids indirectly with a pain threshold paradigm.

Design: In a cross-over design we tested the opioid-hypothesis with an indirect measure, comparing the pain tolerance of 22 participants following exercise with or without musical agency.

Method: Physical exercise was coupled to music by integrating weight-training machines with sensors that control music-synthesis in real time. Pain tolerance was measured as withdrawal time in a cold pressor test.

Results: On average, participants tolerated cold pain for ~5 s longer following exercise sessions with musical agency. Musical agency explained 25% of the variance in cold pressor test withdrawal times after factoring out individual differences in general pain sensitivity.

Conclusions: This result demonstrates a substantial pain reducing effect of musical agency in combination with physical exercise, probably due to stimulation of endogenous opioid mechanisms. This has implications for exercise endurance, both in sports and a multitude of rehabilitative therapies in which physical exercise is effective but painful.