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Protect your health, mortgage equity, income and life

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Women with larger number of “bridging regions” in the brain and Alzheimer

Alzheimer’s disease affects memory. It is rooted in the gut microbiome according to the latest research.  Bad bacteria, molds, fungus, animal feces, high blood glucose, lipids and parasites can affect the brain which cannot fight these invading microbes.
Most women who have Alzheimer’s have also diabetes and depression.  Stress is also a major factor and lack of sunshine. As stress is higher, the less we can sleep.  Those who stayed home and with less education have less ways to use their memory, the first root cause.

Results of recent analysis showed the architecture of tau networks is different in men and women, with women having a larger number of “bridging regions” that connect various communities in the brain. This difference may allow tau to spread more easily between regions, boosting the speed at which it accumulates and putting women at greater risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease. Source: https://neurosciencenews.com/alzheimers-progression-gender-14499/

Most common signs and symptoms of health issues

Final signs of death

  • no pulse
  • no breathing
  • relaxed muscles
  • fixed eyes
  • no response
  • a bowel or bladder release
  • partially shut eyelids

Lung cancer

  • A cough that doesn’t go away or gets worse
  • Breathing trouble, like shortness of breath
  • Coughing up blood
  • Chest pain
  • Hoarseness or wheezing
  • Pneumonia that doesn’t go away or that goes away and comes back

Poisoning

  • drowsiness
  • headaches
  • confusion
  • severe diarrhea
  • feeling and being sick

Medication poisoning

  • diarrhoea
  • stomach pain
  • drowsiness, dizziness or weakness
  • high temperature of 38C (100.4F) or above
  • chills (shivering)
  • loss of appetite
  • headache
  • irritability
  • difficulty swallowing (dysphagia)
  •  breathing difficulties
  • producing more saliva than normal
  • skin rash
  • blue lips and skin (cyanosis)
  • burns around the nose or mouth
  • double vision or blurred vision
  • mental confusion
  • seizures (fits)
  • loss of consciousness
  • coma, in severe cases

Heart Symptoms

  • Chest Discomfort. It’s the most common sign of heart danger
  • Nausea, Indigestion, Heartburn, or Stomach Pain. Some people have these symptoms during a heart attack
  • Pain that Spreads to the Arm
  • You Feel Dizzy or Lightheaded
  • Throat or Jaw Pain
  • You Get Exhausted Easily
  • Snoring
  • Sweating

Metabolic syndrome

Most of the disorders associated with metabolic syndrome don’t have obvious signs or symptoms. One sign that is visible is a large waist circumference. And if your blood sugar is high, you might notice the signs and symptoms of diabetes — such as increased thirst and urination, fatigue, and blurred vision.

Stomach cancer 

  • Poor appetite
  • Weight loss (without trying)
  • Abdominal (belly) pain
  • Vague discomfort in the abdomen, usually above the navel
  • A sense of fullness in the upper abdomen after eating a small meal
  • Heartburn or indigestion
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting, with or without blood

Kidney disease 

  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Loss of appetite
  • Fatigue and weakness
  • Sleep problems
  • Changes in how much you urinate
  • Decreased mental sharpness
  • Muscle twitches and cramps

Symptoms of chronic pain syndrome

  • joint pain
  • muscle aches
  • burning pain
  • fatigue
  • sleep problems
  • loss of stamina and flexibility, due to decreased activity
  • mood problems, including depression, anxiety, and irritability

Early Signs and Symptoms of Alzheimer’s

  • Memory loss that disrupts daily life
  • Challenges in planning or solving problems
  • Difficulty completing familiar tasks at home, at work or at leisure
  • Confusion with time or place
  • Trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships
  • New problems with words in speaking or writing

Uterine Fibroids (MedlinePlus)

  • Heavy or painful periods or bleeding between periods
  • Feeling “full” in the lower abdomen
  • Urinating often
  • Pain during sex
  • Lower back pain
  • Reproductive problems, such as infertility, multiple miscarriages, or early labor

Hormonal imbalances in women

  • heavy, irregular, or painful periods
  • osteoporosis (weak, brittle bones)
  • hot flashes and night sweats
  • vaginal dryness
  • breast tenderness
  • indigestion
  • constipation and diarrhea
  • acne during or just before menstruation

Growth Hormone Deficiency Symptoms in Adults

  • Anxiety and/or depression
  • Baldness (in men)
  • Decrease in sexual function and interest
  • Decreased muscle mass and strength
  • Difficult to concentration and lack of memory
  • Dry, thin skin
  • Elevated triglyceride levels
  • Fatigue and/or tiredness

Digestive tract 

  • Bleeding
  • Bloating
  • Constipation
  • Diarrhea
  • Heartburn
  • Incontinence
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Pain in the belly

Liver disease

  • Skin and eyes that appear yellowish (jaundice)
  • Abdominal pain and swelling
  • Swelling in the legs and ankles
  • Itchy skin
  • Dark urine color
  • Pale stool color, or bloody or tar-colored stool
  • Chronic fatigue
  • Nausea or vomiting

 Leukemia

  • Fever or chills
  • Persistent fatigue, weakness
  • Frequent or severe infections
  • Losing weight without trying
  • Swollen lymph nodes, enlarged liver or spleen
  • Easy bleeding or bruising
  • Recurrent nosebleeds
  • Tiny red spots in your skin (petechiae)

Hypothyroidism 

  • Fatigue
  • Weakness
  • Intolerance to cold
  • Muscle aches and cramps
  • Constipation
  • Weight gain or difficulty losing weight
  • Poor appetite
  • Goiter (enlarged thyroid gland)

Chronic Stress

  • Low energy
  • Headaches
  • Upset stomach, including diarrhea, constipation, and nausea
  • Aches, pains, and tense muscles
  • Chest pain and rapid heartbeat
  • Insomnia
  • Frequent colds and infections
  • Loss of sexual desire and/or ability

Lymph node inflammation 

  • tender, swollen lymph nodes in the neck, armpits, and groin
  • upper respiratory symptoms, such as a fever, runny nose, or sore throat
  • limb swelling, which could indicate lymphatic system blockage
  • night sweats

Chronic fatigue

  • Fatigue
  • Loss of memory or concentration
  • Sore throat
  • Enlarged lymph nodes in your neck or armpits
  • Unexplained muscle or joint pain
  • Headaches
  • Unrefreshing sleep
  • Extreme exhaustion lasting more than 24 hours after physical or mental exercise.

Food poisoning

  • Upset stomach
  • Stomach cramps
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Fever

Parasites

The most common symptoms and signs of intestinal parasites include:

  • Digestive problems including unexplained constipation, diarrhea, or persistent gas
  • Skin problems including unexplained rashes, eczema, or hives
  • Muscle and joint pain
  • Fatigue
  • Lack of satiation after meals
  • Constant hunger
  • Teeth grinding during sleep
  • Anxiety
  • Itchy skin
  • Yeast infections
  • Loss of appetite
  • Iron deficiency
  • Itching of the anus or vagina

Knee Pain

Outline

Knee pain is a typical protest that influences individuals all things considered. Knee pain might be the aftereffect of damage, for example, a cracked tendon or torn ligament. Ailments — including joint pain, gout and contaminations — additionally can cause knee pain.Numerous kinds of minor knee pain react well to self-care measures. Exercise based recuperation and knee props likewise can help alleviate knee pain. Now and again, be that as it may, your knee may require careful fix.

Symptoms
The location and severity of knee pain may vary, depending on the cause of the problem. Signs and symptoms that sometimes accompany knee pain include:

  • Swelling and stiffness
  • Redness and warmth to the touch
  • Weakness or instability
  • Popping or crunching noises
  • Inability to fully straighten the knee

Causes

Knee pain can be caused by injuries, mechanical problems, types of arthritis and other problems.

Injuries

A knee injury can affect any of the ligaments, tendons or fluid-filled sacs (bursae) that surround your knee joint as well as the bones, cartilage and ligaments that form the joint itself. Some of the more common knee injuries include:

  • ACL injury. An ACL injury is a tear of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) — one of four ligaments that connect your shinbone to your thighbone. An ACL injury is particularly common in people who play basketball, soccer or other sports that require sudden changes in direction.
  • Fractures. The bones of the knee, including the kneecap (patella), can be broken during motor vehicle collisions or falls. People whose bones have been weakened by osteoporosis can sometimes sustain a knee fracture simply by stepping wrong.
  • Torn meniscus. The meniscus is formed of tough, rubbery cartilage and acts as a shock absorber between your shinbone and thighbone. It can be torn if you suddenly twist your knee while bearing weight on it.
  • Knee bursitis. Some knee injuries cause inflammation in the bursae, the small sacs of fluid that cushion the outside of your knee joint so that tendons and ligaments glide smoothly over the joint.
  • Patellar tendinitis. Tendinitis is irritation and inflammation of one or more tendons — the thick, fibrous tissues that attach muscles to bones. Runners, skiers, cyclists, and those involved in jumping sports and activities may develop inflammation in the patellar tendon, which connects the quadriceps muscle on the front of the thigh to the shinbone.

Mechanical problems

Some examples of mechanical problems that can cause knee pain include:

  • Loose body. Sometimes injury or degeneration of bone or cartilage can cause a piece of bone or cartilage to break off and float in the joint space. This may not create any problems unless the loose body interferes with knee joint movement, in which case the effect is something like a pencil caught in a door hinge.
  • Iliotibial band syndrome. This occurs when the tough band of tissue that extends from the outside of your hip to the outside of your knee (iliotibial band) becomes so tight that it rubs against the outer portion of your femur. Distance runners and cyclists are especially susceptible to iliotibial band syndrome.
  • Dislocated kneecap. This occurs when the triangular bone (patella) that covers the front of your knee slips out of place, usually to the outside of your knee. In some cases, the kneecap may stay displaced and you’ll be able to see the dislocation.
  • Hip or foot pain. If you have hip or foot pain, you may change the way you walk to spare these painful joints. But this altered gait can place more stress on your knee joint. In some cases, problems in the hip or foot can cause knee pain.

Types of arthritis

More than 100 different types of arthritis exist. The varieties most likely to affect the knee include:

  • Osteoarthritis. Sometimes called degenerative arthritis, osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis. It’s a wear-and-tear condition that occurs when the cartilage in your knee deteriorates with use and age.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis. The most debilitating form of arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune condition that can affect almost any joint in your body, including your knees. Although rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic disease, it tends to vary in severity and may even come and go.
  • Gout. This type of arthritis occurs when uric acid crystals build up in the joint. While gout most commonly affects the big toe, it can also occur in the knee.
  • Pseudogout. Often mistaken for gout, pseudogout is caused by calcium-containing crystals that develop in the joint fluid. Knees are the most common joint affected by pseudogout.
  • Septic arthritis. Sometimes your knee joint can become infected, leading to swelling, pain and redness. Septic arthritis often occurs with a fever, and there’s usually no trauma before the onset of pain. Septic arthritis can quickly cause extensive damage to the knee cartilage. If you have knee pain with any of these symptoms, see your doctor right away.

Other problems

Patellofemoral pain syndrome is a general term that refers to pain arising between the kneecap (patella) and the underlying thighbone (femur). It’s common in athletes; in young adults, especially those who have a slight maltracking of the kneecap; and in older adults, who usually develop the condition as a result of arthritis of the kneecap.

Risk factors

A number of factors can increase your risk of having knee problems, including:

  • Excess weight. Being overweight or obese increases stress on your knee joints, even during ordinary activities such as walking or going up and down stairs. It also puts you at increased risk of osteoarthritis by accelerating the breakdown of joint cartilage.
  • Lack of muscle flexibility or strength. A lack of strength and flexibility can increase the risk of knee injuries. Strong muscles help to stabilize and protect your joints, and muscle flexibility can help you achieve full range of motion.
  • Certain sports or occupations. Some sports put greater stress on your knees than do others. Alpine skiing with its rigid ski boots and potential for falls, basketball’s jumps and pivots, and the repeated pounding your knees take when you run or jog all increase your risk of knee injury. Jobs that require repetitive stress on the knees such as construction or farming also can increase your risk.
  • Previous injury. Having a previous knee injury makes it more likely that you’ll injure your knee again.

Complications

Not all knee pain is serious. But some knee injuries and medical conditions, such as osteoarthritis, can lead to increasing pain, joint damage and disability if left untreated. And having a knee injury — even a minor one — makes it more likely that you’ll have similar injuries in the future.

Prevention

Although it’s not always possible to prevent knee pain, the following suggestions may help forestall injuries and joint deterioration:

  • Keep extra pounds off. Maintain a healthy weight; it’s one of the best things you can do for your knees. Every extra pound puts additional strain on your joints, increasing the risk of injuries and osteoarthritis.
  • Be in shape to play your sport. To prepare your muscles for the demands of sports participation, take time for conditioning. Work with a coach or trainer to ensure that your technique and movement are the best they can be.
  • Practice perfectly. Make sure the technique and movement patterns you use in your sports or activity are the best they can be. Lessons from a professional can be very helpful.
  • Get strong, stay flexible. Because weak muscles are a leading cause of knee injuries, you’ll benefit from building up your quadriceps and hamstrings, which support your knees. Balance and stability training helps the muscles around your knees work together more effectively. And because tight muscles also can contribute to injury, stretching is important. Try to include flexibility exercises in your workouts.
  • Be smart about exercise. If you have osteoarthritis, chronic knee pain or recurring injuries, you may need to change the way you exercise. Consider switching to swimming, water aerobics or other low-impact activities — at least for a few days a week. Sometimes simply limiting high-impact activities will provide relief.

 

Source: https://www.mayoclinic.org

Looking for bay area (San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Peninsula) caregivers: Text Motherhealth caregivers at 4088541883

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