The future of health applications

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Do you have a good experience with a mobile health app? Email Connie your health story using a mobile health app.

Email motherhealth@gmail.com to list your mobile health application in this site. A brief description and link should be included.

https://asuonline.asu.edu/newsroom/online-learning-tips/how-technology-helping-health-and-wellness-providers-promote-healthy-lifestyle-choices

A mobile health application designed by health consumers

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Email motherhealth@gmail.com to participate in a mobile health application designed by you , with profit sharing and employs a village. Share your thoughts in defining the requirements for this mobile health application designed by you and for your health and wellness relevant  today and many years from now.

Web and mobile appointment with doctors for less than 5 min

We are looking for investors to compete with teladoc. Email motherhealth@gmail.com


 

Teladoc’s membership swelled to 17.5 million, a 43 percent increase year-over-year. The company recorded 310,467 visits for the fourth quarter, up 68 percent from Q4 2015. There were 952,081 for the year, representing a 65 percent jump. Total revenue was $37.4 million for the fourth quarter of 2016, representing an increase of 65 percent from last year. Similarly, the full year revenue was up by 59 percent, bringing Teladoc’s 2016 total to $123.2 million

“During the year, we completed our company’s 2 millionth telehealth visit, representing savings through our clients in the U.S. healthcare system of over $900 million,” Gorevic said on the call.  “As context, it took us about 12 years to reach our first million visits, while only 14 months for our second million. This clearly signals the inflection point in overall telehealth adoption.”


 

Global millenials lessons from BREXIT

Decades of chaos have been unleashed by a generation of voters that barely possesses the digital literacy to use a USB stick.

By Lauren Razavi

Lauren Razavi is a feature writer specializing in business, technology and innovation stories. She lives in Norwich, England.

Mixed reactions to Brexit from Brits overseas

British travelers in a Paris train station have mixed reactions to the outcome of the historic referendum back home to leave the European Union. (Reuters)

Today has been a day of bitterness, resentment and betrayal for British millennials like me. Overnight, my generation has lost the right to call ourselves Europeans, as well as the right to live, love and work in the 27 other countries of the European Union. Among the many divisions the referendum has revealed in the U.K., the chasm between generations is becoming the most pronounced. While the Leave campaign achieved a two-point victory in the referendum, 75 percent of voters between 18 and 24 wanted to remain.

For all intents and purposes, the referendum result is just the latest in a series of attacks on my generation’s future. First came the financial crisis, caused by poor decision-making on the part of baby boomers across the world. Soon after came austerity measures that disproportionately affected young people in favor of protecting British pensions. Now we are being forced from the European Union — against the wishes of the vast majority of young people — in an attack from a generation that will live to see very little of its consequences.