Music and relaxing place help in healing

C.A.R.E. Channel provides relaxing imagery, music

a waterfall, as a part of the C.A.R.E. Channel imagery
The C.A.R.E. Channel provides a healing environment to patients and their care providers. Images can be seen on hospital TVs or downloaded from www.healinghealth.com.

Being a world class research hospital means continuously enhancing our world class environment of care. That now extends to offering specially designed, relaxing television programming called The C.A.R.E. Channel.

The channel’s name is an acronym for “Continuous Ambient Relaxation Environment.” View it for free on channel 08 anyplace the Clinical Center cable system is operable.

Running 24/7, it features nature imagery during the daytime and transitions to a moving star-filled sky during the overnight, accompanied by original instrumental music designed to be soothing and relaxing.

“When a project involves improving our patients’ experience, it’s never a hard sell to get Clinical Center staff excited to team up and make it happen,” said John Pollack, chief of the Department of Spiritual Care.

The C.A.R.E. Channel is brought to the Clinical Center through a collaboration between the Departments of Spiritual Care and Nursing. The programming runs 84 hours before repeating itself, fitting for extended stays common to the Clinical Center.

The channel is a tool that for some patients may help reduce anxiety, assist with restfulness and offer a positive focal point when in discomfort.

The relaxing images may help calm nerves in clinics and waiting rooms. Outpatients and caregivers may wish to tune in as they wind down in the Safra Lodge from a hectic appointment slate. Or inpatients may find it a welcome alternative if they don’t wish to or are unable to follow news and plot-driven shows. The possibilities are many — whether to add serenity or just drown out hospital noise.

Questions about the Clinical Center’s broadcasting of the C.A.R.E. Channel? Email John Pollack at john.pollack@nih.gov.

 


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PTSD – over processing of brain to outside stimuli

Scientists find potential neurobiological marker to help recognize PTSD patients

Scientists at the Universities of Birmingham and Amsterdam hope to have found a new neurobiological marker to help recognize patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Using an electroencephalogram (EEG) – a test that detects electrical activity in a person’s brain via electrodes attached to their scalp – researchers studied the brain activity of a group of thirteen patients with PTSD.  The group was then compared to a group who had suffered a similar trauma but had not gone on to develop PDST.

PTSD is estimated to affect about one in every ten people who have a traumatic experience.  It can develop immediately after someone experiences a disturbing event or it can occur weeks, months or even years later and can affect a person’s memory.

The type of events that can cause PTSD include serious road accidents, violent personal assaults, witnessing violent deaths, military combat, being held hostage, terrorist attacks and natural disasters.

Dr Ali Mazaheri, of the University of Birmingham’s School of Psychology and Centre for Human Brain Health, said of the study published today in Nature Scientific Reports: “We know that a symptom of PTSD can be heightened sensory sensitivity.

“In this study, we tested the brain’s response to a simple auditory sensory change by playing simple (standard 1000Hz) tones every second, and then intermittently playing a slightly altered tone (1200 Hz), known as a deviant.

“What we found was that patients who had developed PTSD showed enhanced brain responses to deviant tones, suggesting their brain over-processed any change in the environment.

“Importantly we found the more enhanced their response was, the more poorly they performed on cognitive tests looking at memory.”

Katrin Bangel, of the University of Amsterdam, said: “This is the first research study of its kind. The neurobiological evidence we now have shows how altered brain activity of a patient with PTSD is closely related to the way it processes the world.

“What’s more, this study is very unique in that it compared PTSD patients with a control group of those that also suffered similar trauma but didn’t develop PTSD, rather than a control group who had no trauma or PTSD – this really allows us to look at what triggers PTSD following significant trauma.

“We now potentially have a new neurobiological marker for PTSD patients that maps to their own individual symptoms.

“This marker, if validated, could be used to assess if an individual is getting better with treatment.   It can also be potentially used in diagnosing patients.”

Professor Dr Miranda Olff, of the University of Amsterdam and Arq Psychotrauma Expert Group, said: “This area of research is incredibly important.

“Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a debilitating disorder caused by very stressful, frightening or distressing events.

“Someone with PTSD often relives the traumatic event through nightmares and flashbacks, and may experience feelings of isolation, irritability and guilt.

“They may also have problems sleeping, such as insomnia, and find concentrating difficult.

“These symptoms are often severe and persistent enough to have a significant impact on the person’s day-to-day life.

“Therefore it is vital that we find new ways to treat the condition and also assess treatment outcomes.”

The team has now begun further research validating the marker and also plans a clinical trial to test potential treatments on patients with PTSD.

How you can use your health history form to find holistic cures with a CAM doctor

A complimentary alternative or medical doctor can help you find holistic healing ways. Knowing details of your health history will allow your health care professionals and you determine the course of action toward a healthier you.

Your determination to optimize your current health and your environment will have a greater impact on your success to achieving a healthier you.

If I become your health coach, you have to work with me to motivate yourself to wake up each day with the goal of achieving maximum health.

Examine the air your breath, the water or liquid drink you take, the time you sleep and for how long, your stress level, the texture of your skin, your eyes and your vowel.

For quality supplementation to reset your gene expression to a younger you with AGELOC family of products, visit

http://www.clubalthea.pxproducts.com

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HARMFUL EFFECTS OF STRESS ON THE BRAIN AND PROMISING APPROACHES FOR RELIEF

 

What can harm your thyroid?

My uncle in Silicon Valley died of thyroid cancer.

Take action about your health and find out how:

  • Thyroid harming toxins in your water
  • Makeup products that are harming your health
  • How to determine if you’re mercury sensitive
  • How to detoxify your body
  • How chronic infections affect thyroid health
  • How leaky gut can lead to thyroid disorder
Mercury affects every cell and system in our body and the following are symptoms of mercury sensitivity:
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Brain fog or decreased concentration.
  • Fatigue
  • Frequent headaches.
  • Ataxia (decreased control over muscular movements such as with walking or picking up objects)
  • Sleep disturbance in children
  • Autoimmune disease

Share what you learned at motherhealth@gmail.com to be shared in this site.

Toxins are present in our environment, and there’s very little we can do to eliminate all of them. We can, however, limit our exposure to toxic compounds, reducing the likelihood of experiencing issues with our thyroid. Supplementing with iodine is also an important step toward protecting your thyroid from toxic compounds. Learn these 6 toxins that can destroy your thyroid so you can prepare yourself.

1. BPA

As an endocrine disruptor, BPA can affect hormone levels and throw thyroid function out of whack. While there are many studies documenting BPA’s effects on the thyroid in adults and children, a recent one took a different approach. By looking at newborns and their mothers, the study suggested higher levels of BPA cause a decrease in thyroid function in women. All of the baby boys, though, had an increase in thyroid function from the higher levels of BPA. The theory here is that the women—while pregnant—saw a drop in thyroid function and the sons’ thyroids overcompensated. While the trend did not carry over to newborn girls, avoiding BPA while pregnant just makes sense.

2. Bromine

Bromine is toxic to the thyroid, but with it in everything from pool cleaner to pasta, finding something without the endocrine disruptor can be tricky. [3] Often, even healthy patients can have high levels of the flame-retardant substance in their bodies. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are even finding their way into the breast milk of American women. [4] One common source of bromine is brominated vegetable oil—which is still found in many drinks—so remember, it pays to read those labels!

3. Perchlorate

Studies suggest low thyroid function in mothers is linked to neurodevelopmental problems in children. While BPA—as mentioned in number 1—or any score of nasty toxins could be the cause of an unhealthy thyroid, perchlorate is definitely one of the usual suspects. [5] [6] But while there are numerous studies linking it with thyroid problems, the FDA still approved it for use as an anti-static agent in food packaging, making avoiding it a lot more difficult.

4. Pesticides

When it comes to maintaining a healthy thyroid, avoiding pesticides could also be key. In India, thyroid disorders are on the rise, but there are measures in place to make sure much of the population has sufficient access to iodine, something essential for thyroid function. One recent study suggested this spike is due to pesticide and other chemical exposure, with experts noting almost 60 percent of cases aren’t connected to iodine-deficiency. While the idea of pesticide exposure and thyroid problems is nothing new, maintaining iodine levels and avoiding pesticides could be the perfect combination.

5. PFCs

There’s a report that a higher level of perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) in the blood could affect thyroid function in women.  Used in the manufacturing of lots of common things, PFCs can even be found in pizza boxes and takeout containers; your mattress might even contain them! Even though the use of the chemicals is being phased out in the U.S., imported products could still be a concern.  Endocrine disruptors like PFCs take a long time to break down in the body, so this study is disturbing, to say the least.

6. Fluoride

Almost 70 percent of the U.S. water supply is fluoridated to help prevent cavities. Many people don’t know, however, that fluoride was actually prescribed as a remedy for an overactive thyroid during the first half of the 20th century. According to some reports, 2 to 5 mg of fluoride per day over a period of months was all it took to lower thyroid function; this becomes a problem when you realize that’s about the same amount people drinking fluoridated water are exposed to daily.

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Molecular Mimicry—An Autoimmune Theory

Molecular mimicry is the theory that bacterial cells or other microbial “triggers” have a similar appearance to the cells that make up parts of our physiology or “self” antigens.

When an infection occurs, these infectious cells are recognized as foreign. This is really great for getting rid of the infections, but sometimes the immune system targets proteins in the infectious cells that resemble the proteins in our own cells. This inadvertently causes a cross-reaction with our “self” antigens, i.e., our own cells. This case of mistaken identity is thought to trigger the start of autoimmunity.

One example is Streptococcus pyogenes. This is the bacteria that causes the common throat infection known as “strep throat”. In some cases, especially when the infection is not treated with antibiotics within two to three weeks, the immune system will start launching an attack against the Streptococcus bacteria.

Unfortunately, a component of the bacteria’s cell wall resembles that of the human heart valves, and this results in the immune system attacking the human heart valves in a case of mistaken identity. This reaction is known as rheumatic fever and can be deadly and often necessitates heart valve transplants. Arnold Schwarzenegger is probably the most well known person who was affected with this condition and has had to have heart valve transplants as a result.

Which bacteria have been associated with triggering Hashimoto’s?

A variety of bacterial infections have been implicated in triggering autoimmune thyroiditis, including Helicobacter Pylori (the same bacteria that causes ulcers), Borrelia burgdorferi (associated with Lyme disease) and Yersinia enterocolitica.

Antibodies to Yersinia (indicating exposure) in people with Hashimoto’s were found fourteen times more often than in people without Hashimoto’s. Yersinia membranes contain a site that binds TSH, making it a prime suspect based on the molecular mimicry theory.  Infection with this bacteria can induce antibodies against sites that recognize and stimulate TSH receptors, like the thyroid peroxidase enzyme or thyroglobulin.

People can contract a Yersinia enterocolitica infection from contaminated meat, poultry, dairy products, and seafood (especially oysters). In 2012, a consumer group found that 67% of pork sold in the U.S. was contaminated with Yersinia!!

Testing

Physicians can run blood tests, stool antigen or breath tests for H. pylori. If you cannot find a physician that will run the test for you, you can also order your own labs tests via direct to patient lab testing that we have set up through our shopping cart and third-party links on thyroidpharmacistconsulting.com/tests.

Borrelia is available as a blood test, while presence of Yersinia can be tested by a comprehensive stool analysis by requesting Yersinia to be added to the test panel.

Treating Infections

New autoimmune theories have established that once the antigen (trigger) is removed, the antibody production goes away and the innocent part of our bodies (in the case of Hashimoto’s, the TPO enzyme) is no longer a target.

In the case of infections, once the infection is removed, the TPO should no longer be a trigger once the immune system recognizes that the infection is gone.  Thus, treating infections may help to heal Hashimoto’s. In other cases, the infection may be gone and the immune system may need a reboot.

Antibiotics for Autoimmune Conditions?

Some individuals have reported the normalization of thyroid peroxidase antibodies following taking the antibiotic doxycycline, which is effective for Yersinia enterocolitica and borellia burgdorferi as well as other bacteria.

Work with your doctor to test for infections, and use antibiotics judiciously, as they can be incredibly dangerous when used incorrectly and lead to multi-drug resistance, an elimination of the beneficial bacterial flora and numerous side effects. There is a multitude of different antibiotics, each with a different group of bacteria they target, and each with their own set of side effects. Blindly taking antibiotics without knowing the cause of your infection may end up inadvertently destroying the beneficial bacteria while letting pathogenic and opportunistic bacteria thrive.

Be sure to supplement with probiotics during courses of antibiotic therapy, but at different times throughout the day so that the beneficial bacteria in the probiotics are not killed by the antibiotics. Work with your pharmacist to find out the half-life of your antibiotics and to find an optimal time to take probiotics.

Treatments for H. Pylori

H. pylori is a stubborn infection. Standard medical treatments for H. pylori include:

Triple therapy: Two antibiotics: Amoxicillin or Metronidazole plus Clarithromycin with a Proton Pump Inhibitor (While Proton Pump Inhibitors can make us more susceptible to H. Pylori by themselves, they work in synergy with antibiotics to reduce H. Pylori)

Quadruple therapy: Pepto Bismol + tetracycline + metronidazole + Proton Pump Inhibitor

Some individuals may be hesitant to try antibiotics… integrative clinicians have reported much success with using natural remedies like the ones listed below…

Natural Substances That Can Help Overcome Infections

What are the biggest component of your metabolism?

Your metabolism refers to the millions of chemical processes that keep your body alive and functioning.

It is related to weight because it influences the amount of energy your body needs at any given point. Take in more energy than you need, and the excess will be stored as fat.

Nonetheless many people are quick to blame a “slow metabolism” for their weight gain, when in fact they need to make better food choices and exercise choices.

The biggest component of your metabolism – accounting for 50 to 80 per cent of the energy used each day – is your basal metabolic rate (BMR), which is the energy your body burns just to maintain functioning at rest.

(Other influences include how much physical activity you do, and the ‘thermic effect’ of the food you eat – that is energy you use to digest and absorb your food.)

While there are many pills, supplements and foods that claim to boost metabolism and burn fat, most of these claims are unproven, says Tim Crowe, associate professor in nutrition at Deakin University.

Even if they did work, they might come with unintended side effects, such as increasing your heart rate, he says.

Nonetheless, it can be helpful to know what factors do affect your metabolism, as some of them are within your control. And even knowing you have factors you cannot control may nonetheless be useful as it can motivate you to take extra care to compensate for the issue, perhaps by being more vigilant about your diet and exercise.

Here are 10 factors that affect BMR and metabolism:

1. Muscle mass – that is, the amount of muscle tissue on your body. Muscle requires more energy to function than fat. So the more muscle tissue you carry, the more energy your body needs just to exist. (While most forms of exercise will help boost muscle, resistance or strength training is most effective: for example lifting weights and exercises that work against the resistance of your body weight such as push-ups, squats and lunges.)

2. Age – As you get older, your metabolic rate generally slows. This is partly because of a loss of muscle tissue, and also because of hormonal and neurological changes. When babies and children go through periods of growth, their metabolism speeds up.

3. Body size – People with bigger bodies tend to have a larger BMR because they usually have larger internal organs and fluid volume to maintain. Taller people have a larger skin surface, which means their bodies may have to work harder to maintain a constant temperature.

4. Gender – As men are usually larger than women, they generally have faster metabolisms.

5. Genetics – This can also play a role in whether you have a slower or faster metabolism, and some genetic disorders can also affect your metabolism.

6. Physical activity – Regular exercise increases muscle mass and encourages your body to burn kilojoules at a faster rate, even when at rest.

7. Hormonal factors – Hormonal imbalances caused by certain conditions, including hypo- and hyperthyroidism, can affect your metabolism.

8. Environmental factors – The weather can also have an effect on your metabolism; if it is very cold or very hot, your body has to work harder to maintain its normal temperature and that increases the metabolic rate.

9. Drugs – Caffeine and nicotine can increase your metabolic rate, while medications including some antidepressants and anabolic steroids can contribute to weight gain regardless of what you eat.

10. Diet – Certain aspects of your diet can also affect metabolism. For instance if you don’t have enough iodine for optimal thyroid function, it can slow down your metabolism.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/health/2015-11-12/what-really-affects-your-metabolism/6934608