Bloating , hunched posture, parasites and signs and symptoms

  • Gas pains
    Belching or passing gas clears gas from the digestive tract, but when gas is stuck it causes abdominal pain.
  • Irritable bowel syndrome
    Irritable bowel syndrome is a common condition that causes painful spasms and cramping in the large intestine.
  • Gastritis
    Gastritis is an inflammation of the stomach lining, causes stomach upset, irritation, and pain.
  • Constipation (child)
    Constipation is having less than three bowel movements a week, causing hard stools, abdominal pain and more.
  • Constipation (adult)
    Constipation is having less than three bowel movements a week, causing hard stools, abdominal pain and more.
    To do: Eat fiber-rich whole foods (raw or cooked).  Exercise and massage tummy with coconut oil and peppermint oil.
    Insert a suppository with coconut oil for bed-ridden seniors who are taking many kinds of medications.
  • Gastroenteritis
    Gastroenteritis is inflammation of the stomach and intestine that causes diarrhea and vomiting.
  • Indigestion
    Indigestion is pain and burning in the upper abdomen, an feeling of fullness after a meal, belching, and gas.
  • Osteoporos
    Osteoporosis occurs when bones become weak and can break more easily.
  • Gallstones
    A gallstone attack occurs when a stone blocks the bile duct, causes right upper abdominal pain and cramping.
  • Giardiasis
    Giardiasis is an infection of the small intestine causing diarrhea, gas, bloating, nausea and stomach cramps.
  • Helicobacter pylori infection
    Helicobacter, bacteria in the digestive tract, causes peptic ulcers and their associated pain and burning.
  • Polycystic kidney disease
    Polycystic kidney disease can cause abdominal pain, headaches, and pain in the sides and back.
  • Muscle strain
    Muscle strain occurs when muscles are stressed, overworked, or injured due to physical activity or labor.
  • Food poisoning
    Food poisoning can cause abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, fever, chills, and weakness.
  • Panic attack
    When someone has a panic attack, that person feels a sudden, intense fear that can’t be controlled.
  • Peptic ulcer
    Peptic ulcers, sores in the lining of the stomach or upper intestine, cause abdominal pain, gas, and more.
  • Diverticulitis
    Diverticulitis is a condition of the colon and causes pain, cramping, infection, bleeding, and other symptoms.
  • Lactose intolerance
    Lactose intolerance, or the inability to digest lactose, leads to gas, bloating, and other symptoms.
  • Intestinal ischemia
    Symptoms of intestinal ischemia include pain, bloody bowel movements, abdominal swelling, vomiting, and more.
  • Intestinal obstruction
    Intestinal obstruction is when the intestine is blocked and causes pain, swelling, nausea, diarrhea, and more.
  • Intussusception
    Intussusception is an intestinal condition and causes severe pain, bloody stools, diarrhea, fever, and more.
  • Hepatitis A
    Hepatitis A is an inflammation of the liver. Symptoms include fever, fatigue, yellowing of the skin, and more.
  • Hepatitis B
    Hepatitis B is an inflammation of the liver that may cause fever, fatigue, dark urine, jaundice, and more.
  • Hepatitis C
    Hepatitis B is an inflammation of the liver that may cause yellowing of the skin and eyes, tiredness, and more.
  • Celiac disease
    Celiac disease, which is an intestinal reaction to gluten, can cause gas, diarrhea, bloating, and weight loss.
  • Colon cancer
    Colon cancer is often asymptomatic, but it can cause constipation, bowel obstruction, bloody stool and more.
  • Colon polyps
    Colon polyps are growths that form in the lining of the colon, and can cause constipation, diarrhea and more.
  • Crohn’s disease
    Crohn’s disease is a digestive condition that causes swelling, cramping, diarrhea, and nutritional problems.
  • Cystic fibrosis
    Cystic fibrosis is an inherited disease that causes the body to produce abnormally thick and sticky mucus.
  • Dermatomyositis
    Dermatomyositis is a condition that causes muscle swelling and weakness, and a rash on the face and joints.
  • Proctitis
    Proctitis is pain and inflammation of the rectal lining caused by infection.
  • Pancreatitis
    Pancreatitis, an inflammation of the pancreas, causes abdominal pain and swelling, nausea, and rapid pulse.
  • Ulcerative colitis
    Ulcerative colitis causes swelling in the large intestine and can lead to cramping, diarrhea, and more.
  • Gastrointestinal bleeding
    The symptoms of gastrointestinal bleeding include black or bloody stool or vomit, dizziness, and cramping.
  • Depression (Child and Adolescent)
    Depression is a painful sadness that interferes with a child’s schoolwork, family life, and social activities.
  • Diabetic ketoacidosis
    Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include dry mouth, excessive thirst and urination, and more.
  • Diverticulosis
    Diverticulosis is a condition of the colon and causes pain, cramping, infection, bleeding, and other symptoms.
  • Drug overdose
    A drug overdose can be fatal and causes sleepiness, confusion, coma, vomiting, and other symptoms.
  • Lupus (systemic lupus erythematosus)
    Lupus is a chronic autoimmune disease marked by swollen painful joints, a rash, swollen lymph nodes, and more.
  • Thalassemia
    Thalassemia is a rare group of genetic blood disorders effecting red blood cells and leading to anemia.
  • Anemia
    Anemia, a lack of red blood cells, can cause fatigue, pale skin, weakness, dizziness, headache and more.
  • Pancreatic cancer
    Pancreatic cancer is typically asymptomatic until the cancer has advanced, making treatment difficult.
  • Drug allergy
    A drug allergy is an allergic reaction to a medication and can cause a rapid heartbeat and difficulty breathing.
  • Narcotic abuse
    Narcotic abuse can cause fatigue, shallow breathing, anxiety, euphoria, vomiting, confusion, and constipation.
  • Porphyria
    Porphyria is a condition that can affect the nerves and skin, making the skin extremely sensitive to sunlight.
  • Hydronephrosis
    Hydronephrosis is a condition of the kidneys and causes aching or pain, urinary symptoms, fever, and nausea.
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
    Inflammatory bowel disease causes swelling and symptoms such as cramping, chronic diarrhea, and bleeding.
  • Iron poisoning
    Iron poisoning causes abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, and dehydration.
  • Ascaris worms
    Ascarisis is an infection by a roundworm, and can cause visible worms in the stool and respiratory symptoms.
  • Kyphosis
    Kyphosis, a rounding or forward curve of the spine, causes a hump in the back, back pain, stiffness, and more.
  • Intestinal Ileus
    Intestinal ileus is a condition of the intestinal muscles causing cramps and bloating, vomiting, gas, and more.
  • Allergic reaction
    Allergic reaction causes sneezing, runny nose and hives and can lead to anaphylaxis, a whole body reaction.
  • Aortic aneurysm (abdomen)
    An abdominal aortic aneurysm is swelling of the main abdominal artery and can cause sudden chest pain.
  • Tick bite
    A tick-related illness may cause a rash that expands out from the site of the bite, fever, chills, and more.
  • Chagas disease
    Chagas disease is caused by a tropical parasite and can cause fever, ill feeling, and swelling around the eye.
  • Small intestine cancer
    Small intestine cancer is rare and often has no symptoms, but can cause symptoms in its advanced stages.
  • Appendicitis
    Appendicitis is an infection of the appendix causing abdominal pain that begins near the belly button.
  • Budd-Chiari syndrome
    Budd-Chiari syndrome is a rare liver condition, symptoms include pain, swelling, and vomiting blood.
  • Pseudohypoparathyroidism
    Pseudohypoparathyroidism is a rare inherited condition that can lead to cramps, muscle spasms, and more.
  • Ricin poisoning
    Ricin is a dangerous poison in castor beans, and causes trouble breathing, nausea, fever and sweating.
  • Lead poisoning
    Lead poisoning causes sudden pain on either side of the lower back, urinary issues, nausea, fever, and chills.
  • Radiation sickness
    Radiation sickness is caused by a high dose of radiation, and causes vomiting, diarrhea, hair loss, and more.
  • Toxic shock syndrome
    Toxic shock syndrome is a serious bacterial infection and causes fever, low blood pressure, a rash, and more.
  • Henoch-schonlein purpura
    Henoch-Sch�nlein purpura is a condition that causes a purple bruise-like rash on the legs and buttocks.
  • Typhoid fever
    Typhoid fever is a life-threatening illness and causes fever, general aches and pains, headache, and weakness.
  • Aortic dissection (abdomen)
    An abdominal aortic dissection is a medical emergency and causes sudden abdominal or back pain.
  • Shingles (herpes zoster)
    Shingles is a painful, blistering, skin rash typically found on the back and sides of the chest.
  • Stomach cancer
    Early stomach cancer may cause commonly misdiagnosed symptoms such as indigestion, nausea, and poor appetite.
  • Abdominal migraine
    Abdominal migraine is recurring stomach pain and vomiting that typically shows up in children between the ages of 3 and 10, although it can also occur in adults.

Limit iron intake to limit growth of invading pathogens

iron.pngIron Limitation as an Innate Immune Defense

In addition to mitigating toxicity associated with hypo- or hyperferremia, regulation of iron distribution serves as an innate immune mechanism against invading pathogens. Even in the absence of infection, several facets of human iron metabolism ensure that iron is scarcely accessible to pathogenic microorganisms. First, the majority of iron in humans is sequestered intracellularly, complexed within hemoglobin inside erythrocytes. Some pathogens have therefore evolved mechanisms to liberate hemoglobin by lysing erythrocytes to ultimately extract iron from heme. However, hemolytic pathogens must subsequently compete with haptoglobin and hemopexin, host glycoproteins that scavenge liberated hemoglobin and heme, respectively (Figure 1D). A second factor limiting the availability of iron to invading pathogens is the paucity of free extracellular iron. Extracellular iron is bound with high affinity by transferrin, which in healthy individuals is typically less than 50% saturated with iron. When transferrin-binding capacity is exceeded, iron can also be chelated with lower affinity by a number of molecules in plasma including albumin, citrate, and amino acids (Nathan et al., 2003).

During infection, additional fortification of iron-withholding defense occurs (Figure 2). The hypoferremia of infection was documented in seminal studies by Cartwright et al. in the 1940s, who noted a precipitous drop in plasma iron levels upon intramuscular inoculation of canines with Staphylococcus aureus. A similar hypoferremic response was noted upon intravenous injection with sterile turpentine, suggesting that inflammation, rather than a specific microbial product, was responsible for declining plasma iron levels (Cartwright et al., 1946). Since these initial observations, much has been learned regarding the importance of iron withholding to the outcome of host-pathogen interactions.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1931312813001522

 

With the oxygenation of the Earth’s atmosphere over 2 billion years ago, abundant soluble Fe2+ was oxidized to insoluble Fe3+, making bioavailable iron much more scarce. At the same time, iron became potentially more toxic since the redox cycling of iron in the presence of oxygen and hydrogen peroxide catalyzes the production of free radicals in the Fenton reaction that can damage DNA, protein, and lipids.Humans and other organisms therefore evolved specialized proteins and tightly regulated homeostatic mechanisms for the uptake, transport, storage, and export of iron to provide adequate iron for essential biologic process, but to limit the toxicity of iron excess.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5977983/

Brain iron loading impairs DNA methylation and alters GABAergic function in mice.

https://www.fasebj.org/doi/abs/10.1096/fj.201801116RR?journalCode=fasebj

The term “hemochromatosis,” introduced by von Recklinghausen at the end of the 19th century, refers to the clinical disorder that results from excess of total body iron and organ failure due to iron toxicity. The disease manifestations include cirrhosis, diabetes mellitus, hypogonadism and other endocrinopathies, cardiomyopathy, arthropathy, skin pigmentation, and, in cirrhotic patients, increased susceptibility to liver cancer.

http://www.bloodjournal.org/content/106/12/3710?sso-checked=true

Alzheimer’s gut bacteria, virus and iron dysregulation

Researchers Identify Virus and Two Types of Bacteria as Major Causes of Alzheimer’s

A worldwide team of senior scientists and clinicians have come together to produce an editorial which indicates that certain microbes – a specific virus and two specific types of bacteria – are major causes of Alzheimer’s Disease. Their paper, which has been published online in the highly regarded peer-reviewed journal, Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, stresses the urgent need for further research – and more importantly, for clinical trials of anti-microbial and related agents to treat the disease.

This major call for action is based on substantial published evidence into Alzheimer’s. The team’s landmark editorial summarises the abundant data implicating these microbes, but until now this work has been largely ignored or dismissed as controversial – despite the absence of evidence to the contrary. Therefore, proposals for the funding of clinical trials have been refused, despite the fact that over 400 unsuccessful clinical trials for Alzheimer’s based on other concepts were carried out over a recent 10-year period.

Opposition to the microbial concepts resembles the fierce resistance to studies some years ago which showed that viruses cause certain types of cancer, and that a bacterium causes stomach ulcers. Those concepts were ultimately proved valid, leading to successful clinical trials and the subsequent development of appropriate treatments.

Professor Douglas Kell of The University of Manchester’s School of Chemistry and Manchester Institute of Biotechnology is one of the editorial’s authors. He says that supposedly sterile red blood cells were seen to contain dormant microbes, which also has implications for blood transfusions.

“We are saying there is incontrovertible evidence that Alzheimer’s Disease has a dormant microbial component, and that this can be woken up by iron dysregulation. Removing this iron will slow down or prevent cognitive degeneration – we can’t keep ignoring all of the evidence,” Professor Douglas Kell said.

Image shows an old lady looking out of a window.

Professor Resia Pretorius of the University of Pretoria, who worked with Douglas Kell on the editorial, said “The microbial presence in blood may also play a fundamental role as causative agent of systemic inflammation, which is a characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease – particularly, the bacterial cell wall component and endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide. Furthermore, there is ample evidence that this can cause neuroinflammation and amyloid-β plaque formation.”

The findings of this editorial could also have implications for the future treatment of Parkinson’s Disease, and other progressive neurological conditions.

ABOUT THIS ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE RESEARCH

Source: University of Manchester
Image Credit: The image is adapted from the University of Manchester press release.
Original Research: Full open access editorial for “Microbes and Alzheimer’s Disease” by Itzhaki, Ruth F.; Lathe, Richard; Balin, Brian J.; Ball, Melvyn J.; Bearer, Elaine L.; Bullido, Maria J.; Carter, Chris; Clerici, Mario; Cosby, S. Louise; Field, Hugh; Fulop, Tamas; Grassi, Claudio; Griffin, W. Sue T.; Haas, Jürgen; Hudson, Alan P.; Kamer, Angela R.; Kell, Douglas B.; Licastro, Federico; Letenneur, Luc; Lövheim, Hugo; Mancuso, Roberta; Miklossy, Judith; Lagunas, Carola Otth; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Perry, George; Preston, Christopher; Pretorius, Etheresia; Strandberg, Timo; Tabet, Naji; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D.; and Whittum-Hudson, Judith A. in Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. Published online March 8 2016 doi:10.3233/JAD-160152


Abstract

Microbes and Alzheimer’s Disease

We are researchers and clinicians working on Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or related topics, and we write to express our concern that one particular aspect of the disease has been neglected, even though treatment based on it might slow or arrest AD progression. We refer to the many studies, mainly on humans, implicating specific microbes in the elderly brain, notably herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1), Chlamydia pneumoniae, and several types of spirochaete, in the etiology of AD. Fungal infection of AD brain [5, 6] has also been described, as well as abnormal microbiota in AD patient blood. The first observations of HSV1 in AD brain were reported almost three decades ago]. The ever-increasing number of these studies (now about 100 on HSV1 alone) warrants re-evaluation of the infection and AD concept.

AD is associated with neuronal loss and progressive synaptic dysfunction, accompanied by the deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, a cleavage product of the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP), and abnormal forms of tau protein, markers that have been used as diagnostic criteria for the disease. These constitute the hallmarks of AD, but whether they are causes of AD or consequences is unknown. We suggest that these are indicators of an infectious etiology. In the case of AD, it is often not realized that microbes can cause chronic as well as acute diseases; that some microbes can remain latent in the body with the potential for reactivation, the effects of which might occur years after initial infection; and that people can be infected but not necessarily affected, such that ‘controls’, even if infected, are asymptomatic

“Microbes and Alzheimer’s Disease” by Itzhaki, Ruth F.; Lathe, Richard; Balin, Brian J.; Ball, Melvyn J.; Bearer, Elaine L.; Bullido, Maria J.; Carter, Chris; Clerici, Mario; Cosby, S. Louise; Field, Hugh; Fulop, Tamas; Grassi, Claudio; Griffin, W. Sue T.; Haas, Jürgen; Hudson, Alan P.; Kamer, Angela R.; Kell, Douglas B.; Licastro, Federico; Letenneur, Luc; Lövheim, Hugo; Mancuso, Roberta; Miklossy, Judith; Lagunas, Carola Otth; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Perry, George; Preston, Christopher; Pretorius, Etheresia; Strandberg, Timo; Tabet, Naji; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D.; and Whittum-Hudson, Judith A. in Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. Published online March 8 2016 doi:10.3233/JAD-160152

The Half Life of Caffeine

The Half Life of Caffeine

half-life-of-caffeineHow long will caffeine be in my system?

Caffeine has become the hot-topic of the moment.  Its addition to so many products makes it important to know how long caffeine sticks around in the body in order to prevent possible overdose.

Caffeine takes a certain amount of time to work through your system. One study some years ago showed that the half-life of caffeine in healthy adults is 5.7 hours (see source). This means if you consume 200mg of caffeine at mid-day, you would still have 100mg in you at around 5.45pm.

What factors can delay caffeine’s half life?

The same study mentioned above showed that people with compromised liver function had a significantly longer half-life (a 49-year-old woman having alcoholic hepatic disease had a serum half-life of 168 hours).

Others can have genetic factors influencing the gene responsible for caffeine metabolism. The gene CYP1A2 is needed by the liver break down up to 95% of the caffeine in the body. Other genes can influence how well this gene does its job (src).

Some people may lack the gene or the gene may be defective. In this case, caffeine stays in the body a long time, increases sensitivity to caffeine, and can even cause allergy-like symptoms.

variation of the gene PDSS2 also affects speed of metabolism. Those with the variation need a lot less caffeine to feel the stimulant affects.

Another study looked at how grapefruit juice may slow down caffeine metabolism in the liver, but it only was a slight inhibitor and wasn’t enough to cause warning.

What is the safe limit of caffeine in the body?

With caffeine levels in beverages and food continuing to climb – many people are asking – what exactly is the safe  limit?

While the average caffeine consumption is around 200mg per day, The Mayo Clinic recommends that people not exceed to 500-600mg per day. Consuming more than this can result in adverse overdose symtoms. This of course is affected by body weight, health, and individual sensitivity.

People can build up a tolerance to the effects of caffeine requiring larger doses to produce the same desired effect. If you are unsure of how much you can handle, it is best to start small and gradually increase your caffeine consumption as needed. Sometimes a caffeine detox is needed to reset caffeine tolerance back to safer/normal amounts.

Those who have built up a high caffeine tolerance can have severe caffeine withdrawal symptoms when detoxing, so it may be wise to quit caffeine gradually.

A lethal dose of caffeine (LD50) consumed orally is equivalent to 150 milligrams per kilogram of body weight, which is what we base our Death by Caffeine application on.

In conclusion, the half life of caffeine might be around 6 hours, but can be influenced by other factors. Caffeine is a drug and should be used with discretion as well as respected.

Zinc, copper and magnesium to fight diabetes and neurodegeneration

Dear GF with diabetes,

If you are not 12,000 miles away from me, I will bring sesame seeds, pumpkin seeds and cashew (raw and unsalted). I will massage you with special oils. Take care, I hope to see you soon.

Connie

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Zinc and Diabetes – Diabetes Self-Management

https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com › Blog › Amy Campbell

Mar 26, 2007 – Zinc is also necessary for the formation of insulin in the pancreas’s beta cells. For these reasons, researchers have looked at the role of zinc supplementation in the prevention and treatment of Type 2 diabetes—unfortunately, without success. However, new light has been shed on the role of zinc indiabetes.

Effects of zinc supplementation on diabetes mellitus: a systematic …

by R Jayawardena – ‎2012 – ‎Cited by 133 – ‎Related articles

Apr 19, 2012 – Zinc is important in insulin action and carbohydrate metabolism [11]. Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes and its complications. … Animal studies have shown that Zinc supplementation improves fasting insulin level and fasting glucose in mice [16].

Introduction · ‎Methods · ‎Results · ‎Discussion

Zinc Benefits for Diabetes: Natural Blood Sugar Control and More …

Dec 8, 2017 – Are you looking for natural blood sugar control techniques? … Zinc benefits include promoting healthy insulin function, providing natural blood sugar control, and might even help to preventdiabetes in the first place. … Take command of your diabetes, simplify blood sugar management …

Low zinc levels could be associated with prediabetes risk

Nov 9, 2017 – Scientists have observed an association between zinc metabolism and the development of prediabetes. The findings suggest that lower concentrations of trace elements in the blood (particularly zinc) play an important role in prediabetes development, although they do not yet understand why.

Zinc supplements for diabetics | Diabetes Forum • The Global …

https://www.diabetes.co.uk › Forums › Diabetes Discussion › Ask A Question

Dec 20, 2012 – 14 posts – ‎5 authors

I have heard that people who suffer from auto-immune conditions are often severely deficient in zinc. Does anyone know anything about this? It’s not something that has ever been mentioned by consultants etc. I am interested in doing the zinc taste test to check for deficiency, but am not sure how accurate it …

Zinc Supplementation in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes – EndocrineWeb

Apr 26, 2016 – Zinc Supplementation in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes. … To gauge the effects of zincsupplementation on patients’ fasting blood glucose levels, HbA1c, serum zinc concentration, and serum insulin levels, the researchers conducted a meta-analysis of randomized trials.

Take Zinc If Your Diabetes Is High – Diabetes Developments

Feb 27, 2016 – If you are healthy, you may not need to take a zinc supplement. But if your health isn’t good enough, a new meta-analysis indicates that you probably need to take one. The study categorizes people with type 2 diabetes as “non-healthy.” zinc (1). The mineral zinc plays an important role in how our bodies …

Prediabetes Patients Improve Fasting Glucose with Zinc

http://www.diabetesincontrol.com › Conditions › Prediabetes

Apr 16, 2016 – Six-month regimen of 30 mg zinc sulfate once daily found effective compared with those on placebo, according to study. In Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, Australian researchers used a cohort of 55 adults, mean age of 44, to assess whether participants would improve fasting glucose with zinc …

Zinc supplements and blood sugars – Diabetes Daily

https://www.diabetesdaily.com › Forum › General › Type 2 Diabetes

Sep 27, 2017 – Before I was diagnosed prediabetic, for at least a year I felt tired & sleepy after lunch. Like 6 months before my diagnosis, I was taking 50 mg zinc a day for a month to see if it helps me build muscle. It did help. Looking back, during that month of taking zinc, I had a lot more energy & I definitely didn’t feel …

Image shows the work Shank3.

ZINC MAY HELP REVERSE BRAIN CHANGES IN AUTISM

According to researchers, cellular changes in the brain caused by genetic mutations associated with Autism can be reversed with the help of zinc. READ MORE…