Virus and thin blood, exercise, foods, meds

Foods that help thin the blood

Turmeric, ginger, garlic, pineapple, cayenne pepper, cinnamon, Dong Quai,  grape seed extract, gingko, Vitamin E, feverfew

Exercise that thin the blood

Standing  squat with deep slow breathing thru nose , breath IN and breath OUT thru the mouth

 

http://www.sciencedaily.com › releases › 2013/04

Apr 1, 2013 – Moreover, the absence of PAR-1 signaling was associated with a slower response to the virus of the innate immune soon after viral infection. The …


Thin blood: Causes, symptoms, and treatment

 

May 12, 2018 – Viral infections, such as HIV, hepatitis C, mumps, rubella, or the Epstein-Barr virus may cause platelet numbers to fall. Bone marrow disorders, …

Hematuria – Harvard Health

http://www.health.harvard.edu › a_to_z › hematuria-a-to-z

 

Feb 14, 2019 – Hematuria is the presence of red blood cells in the urine. … the ureters (the narrow tubes connecting each kidney to the bladder), it can cause … trauma or strenuous exercise, recent viral or bacterial infections, the medications …

Japanese Researchers to Test Blood Thinner For Virus …

http://www.bloomberg.com › news › articles › japanese-resea…

 

Mar 18, 2020 – blood thinner used to treat pancreatitis and kidney disease has been identified as a potential therapy for coronavirus patients, with clinical …

Missing: exercise ‎| Must include: exercise

13 Tips for Using Blood Thinners – WebMD

http://www.webmd.com › DVT › Feature Stories

 

Apr 21, 2015 – Ask your doctor what you should do if you accidentally miss a dose of your blood thinner. 2. Be more careful when you exercise or are doing …

Hughes syndrome – Better Health Channel

http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au › ConditionsAndTreatments

 

Sep 30, 2012 – Treatment includes medications to thin the blood and prevent platelets … that a percentage of patients have had a recent viral or bacterial infection, … such as quitting cigarettes, eating a healthy diet and exercising regularly.

Hughes Syndrome (Antiphospholipid Syndrome): Symptoms …

http://www.healthline.com › health › hughes-syndrome

 

Aug 31, 2018 – Hughes syndrome, also known as “sticky blood syndrome” or antiphospholipid … Having certain viral or bacterial infections, like E. coli or the … like not getting enough exercise and eating a diet high in cholesterol — and … may be prescribed a low-dose aspirin or a daily dose of the blood thinner heparin.

What You Should Know Before Taking New Blood Thinners …

health.usnews.com › Patient Advice

 

Oct 13, 2016 – Yet despite the ability of anticoagulants to prevent dangerous blood clots and stroke, … [See: 7 Signs You Should Stop Exercising Immediately.] … situations when there is a need to reverse Pradaxa’s bloodthinning effects.

Exercise on blood thinner medications- A Physical Therapist …

http://www.starspt.org › exercise-blood-thinner-medications-…

 

Blood thinner medications are prescribed to patients who suffer from deep vein thrombosis (blood clot), pulmonary embolism (blood clot has migrated to the …

Missing: virus ‎| Must include: virus

Polycythemia Vera | National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute …

http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov › health-topics › polycythemia-vera

 

Polycythemia vera is a rare blood disease in which the body makes too many red blood cells, making the blood thicker than normal and causing blood clots.

Let’s Get Physical: The ALS Exercise Debate

ALS News Today

Always Learn Something!

ALS News Today

The Placebo Effect of Fighting ALS

ALS News Today

To ‘B’ or Not to ‘B’?

ALS News Today

How we help slow down aging with seniors with ALS, Parkinson and AD

CNS atrophy leads to muscle atrophy and lack of exercise can facilitate virus and inflammation attacks. With exercise, simple range of motion that seniors can carry will help slow down ALS, Parkinson and Azheimers disease.

We start with whole foods rich in Vitamin C and zinc to fight the virus and inflammation. We do simple stretch , do not over stretch before moving or transferring the patient.

Our seniors are thriving with our care that is compassionate and hands on allowing the seniors to do simple exercises while sitting or on their bed.

Bath soaks: hydrogen peroxide and EPSOM salts

Veggie smoothie: greens, onions, garlic, ginger, turmeric, coconut oil, soaked nuts, lime

Breakfast smoothie: soaked nuts (cashew, almonds, walnut), probiotic, ginger, turmeric, blueberries, banana, avocado, strawberries, amino acid powder and Orgain protein shake

Parasites, virus and cancer are factors that make them wake up in the middle of the night and not get adequate sleep. So we incorporate turmeric, lemon, garlic, ginger, onions, veggies and Vitamin C rich foods in their meals which we made into a smoothie.

Call 408-854-1883 for holistic bay area caregivers.

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=ALS+exercises

card mother

Keeping our brain healthy from birth to 100

Keeping our brain healthy from birth to 100

December 1,2018 at JCC in Palo Alto California

Speakers and event sponsors are welcome. All older adults are invited.

2-5pm, Bldg D room

Tips for healthy brain

Other speakers:
Connie Dello Buono – Health blogger and Motherhealth caregivers founder at www.clubalthea.com

Contact motherhealth@gmail.com for details or text 408-854-1883

Oshman Family Jewish Community Center, Room in Building D.

bldg D.JPG

Flyer

flyer dec 1

 

 

Vitamin C for bones and video exercises for stronger bones for older adults

  • Did you know that a diet low in fruits and vegetables is linked to higher rates of frailty as you age? Or that as you age, your need for calories declines, but your need for nutrients increases?

  • Eat foods rich in Vitamin C for healthy bones. Vitamin C assists in the formation of collagen. … Collagen is abundant in the connective tissue of cartilage and bone — in fact, it makes up about 30% of ourbones, serving as a support structure for mineral deposits and giving bone its resilience.
  • Easy exercises that let you stay active without causing joint pain. See video below
  • The vitamin that may make you less likely to break a hip.Vitamin C
  • Relief for 8 common causes of foot pain — including bunions, hammertoes, and plantar fasciitis. Use oil of almond and add fresh ginger and rosemary essential oils.
  • Exercises that help keep you from twisting your ankle with proper shoes selection
  • The device that could keep you from breaking bones and losing your independence
  • How to increase muscle power to boost your balance and lower your risk of falling? stretching and leg exercises, potassium and Vitamin C for energy
  • Where to put lights, grab bars, and more so you can stay in your own home: in hallway, bathroom, bedroom…

 

9:17

Famous Physical Therapist’s Bob Schrupp and Brad Heineck present three of their favorite exercises for people with osteoporosis …

2:54

Strengthening exercises for osteoporosis patients need to be done safely with doctor’s permission. Hold onto a chair with your …

12:14

“Famous” Physical Therapists Bob Schrupp and Brad Heineck presnet the 10 Best Exercises for Osteoporosis or “Weak Bones“.

11:09

Here is the reference list for the articles used to create this presentation. 1. Giangregorio, L., Papaioannou, A., Macintyre, N., Ashe, …

8:32

http://www.StrongerSeniors.com/ #ExerciseForSeniors Seniors Chair Aerobics- This clip focuses on the lower body. This Chair …

1:14

Vicki Doe Fitness-Health expert: Gabe Sanders PhD, NSCA-CSCS- Using light weights or resistance bands are much safer for …

1:30

In a world-first trial, Brisbane scientists have found weight training can prevent bone fractures in people suffering from …

11:16

“Famous” Physical Therapists Bob Schrupp and Brad Heineck demonstrate 7 exercises to help seniorsimprove their balance and …

6:18

Fitness at Any Age: Regardless of Age, Weight or Athletic Ability ISBN-13: 978-1515067214 Physical activity, along with proper …

5:09

Vivian Goldschmidt, founder of http://saveourbones.com, shows you a little-known osteoporosis exercise that she unearthed …

7:26

Osteoporosis exercises for hip strengthening with Physiotherapist Michelle Kenway from http://www.pelvicexercises.com.au Learn …

2:37

Fitness for Senior Citizen – http://jennyjordan.com.au/fitness-for-senior-citizen.html …

1:49

Physical health promotion in the elderly population- University of Western Ontario. CTF nursing program. IMPORTANT: Consult a …

2:15

Mary started exercising at the age of 70 after she learned that she had osteoporosis. Learn more about Osteoporosis at: …

CC

What body systems are responsible for energy production?

Skeletal muscle is powered by one important compound; adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The body only stores small amounts of ATP in the muscles so it has to replace and resynthesize this energy compound on an ongoing basis. Understanding how it does this is the key to understanding energy systems.

There are 3 separate energy systems through which the body produces ATP. Describing each of these systems in detail goes beyond the aim of this article. Instead it is intended that the brief outlines provided will assist in describing the role of blood lactate during energy production for exercise, and how this knowledge can be used to help with training for improved endurance performance.

ENERGY SYSTEMS

The ATP-PCr system

This system produces energy during the first 5-8 seconds of exercise using ATP stored in the muscles and through the breakdown of phosphocreatine (PCr). This system can operate with or without the presence of oxygen but since it doesn’t rely on oxygen to work it is said to be anaerobic. When activity continues beyond this period the body relies on other ways to produce ATP.

The Glycolytic System

This system produces ATP through the breakdown of glucose in a series on enzymatic reactions. The end product of glycolysis is pyruvic acid. This either gets funneled through a process called the Kreb’s cycle (slow glycolysis) or gets converted into lactic acid (fast glycolysis). The fast glycolytic system produces energy more quickly than slow glycolysis but the end product of lactic acid can accumulate and is thought to lead to muscular fatigue. The contribution of the fast glycolytic energy system rapidly increases after the first 10 seconds and activity lasting up to 45 seconds is supplied by energy mainly from this system. Anything longer than this and there is a growing reliance on the Oxidative system.

The Oxidative system

This is where pyruvic acid from slow glycolysis is converted into a substance called acetyl coenzyme A rather than lactic acid. This substance is then used to produce ATP by funneling it through the Krebs cycle. As it is broken down it produces ATP but also leads to the production of hydrogen and carbon dioxide. This can lead to the blood becoming more acidic. However, when oxygen is present it combines with the hydrogen molecules in series of reactions known as the electron transport chain to form water thus preventing acidification. This chain, which requires the presence oxygen, also leads to the production of ATP. The Krebs cycle and the electron transport chain also metabolise fat for ATP production but this again requires the presence of oxygen so that the fats can be broken down. More ATP can be liberated from the breakdown of fats but because of the increased oxygen demand exercise intensities must be reduced. This is also the most sustainable way of producing ATP.

It is important to remember that these systems are all constantly working to produce energy for all bodily functions and one system is never working exclusively over the others. When it comes to energy production for exercise one system will play a more dominant role (this will be dictated by the type of activity being performed) but all 3 systems will still be working to provide adequate amounts of ATP.

What is Blood Lactate?

It is through the Glycolytic System that the role and production of blood lactate becomes apparent. Recall the end product of glycolysis is pyruvic acid. When this is converted into lactic acid it quickly dissociates and releases hydrogen ions. The remaining compound then combines with sodium or potassium ions to form a salt called lactate. Far from being a waste product, the formation of lactate allows for the continued metabolism of glucose through glycolysis. As long as the clearance of lactate is matched by its production it becomes an important source of fuel.

Clearance of lactate from the blood can occur either through oxidation within the muscle fibre in which it was produced or it can be transported to other muscle fibres for oxidation. Lactate that is not oxidized in this way diffuses from the exercising muscle into the capillaries and it is transported via the blood to the liver. Lactate can then be converted to pyruvate in the presence of oxygen, which can then be converted into glucose. This glucose can either be metabolized by working muscles (as an additional substrate) or stored in the muscles as glycogen for later use. So lactate should be viewed as a useful form of potential energy. Lactic acid and lactate do not cause fatigue per se.

In fact, it is a common misinterpretation that blood lactate or even lactic acid has a direct negative effect on muscle performance. It is now generally accepted that any decrease in muscle performance associated with blood lactate accumulation is due to an increase in hydrogen ions, leading to an increased acidity of the inter-cellular environment. This acidosis is thought to have an unfavourable effect on muscle contraction, and contributes to a feeling of heavy or ‘jelly’ legs.

The term ‘accumulation’ is therefore the key, as an increased production of hydrogen ions (due to an increase production of lactic acid) will have no detrimental effect if clearance is just as fast. During low intensity exercise blood lactate levels will remain at near resting levels as clearance matches production. As exercise intensity increases there comes a break point where blood lactate levels will start to rise (production starts to exceed clearance). This is often referred to as the lactate threshold (LT). If exercise intensity continues to increase a second and often more obvious increase in lactate accumulation is seen. This is referred to as the lactate turn point (LTP).