Foods for Monocyte Health – prevent ALS progression – Omega 3

Foods for Monocyte Health

BY  SHARON PERKINS 
Foods for Monocyte Health

Monocytes, large white blood cells that turn into macrophages in tissue, help control infection by gobbling up bacteria, but have a less beneficial side. Monocytes can cause inflammation that damage tissue. In blood vessels, inflammation can damage the vessels and increase atherosclerosis, a build-up of debris inside blood vessels that can decrease blood flow to the heart. Certain foods may help keep your monocyte count within healthy limits.

Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Omega-3 fatty acids found in fatty fish such as salmon and mackerel and in fish oil supplements have anti-inflammatory properties that appear to protect against atherosclerosis and heart disease. Taking fish oil supplements or consuming fish high in omega-3 fatty acids daily may help decrease monocyte-activated inflammation. In a British study reported in the 2007 issue of “The Journal of Nutrition,” researchers reported that people taking fish oil supplements were less likely to have inflammatory responses in the blood vessel walls. This effect was not as pronounced in people already taking medication to treat peripheral artery disease.

Foods in the Mediterranean Diet

Monounsaturated fats found in oils such as olive oil and foods such as seeds, nuts, vegetables, fruits and whole grains, included in the widely disseminated Mediterranean diet– may have a protective effect against inflammatory responses caused by monocytes, according to Dr. Victoria Drake of the Linus Pauling Institute. Pass on trans fats and saturated fats, often found in processed foods.

Alcohol Intake

A moderate amount of alcohol daily may help reduce dangerous inflammation caused by monocytes. But in large amounts, alcohol can also stimulate inflammation. The key with alcohol consumption is to keep your intake moderate, which is one drink per day for women and no more than two drinks per day for men. Purple grape juice may have the same protective benefits as alcohol, according to the Mayo Clinic, so don’t start drinking if you don’t already consume alcohol.

Sugar Intake

Diabetes and high blood glucose levels in the blood are associated with an increase in monocyte release and inflammation, and it may make sense to cut refined sugars from your diet to decrease inflammation and the risk of heart disease. However, a study conducted by researchers from the University of California, Davis and reported in the January 2007 “American Journal of Clinical Nutrition” did not find an increase in monocyte release after meals with a high glycemic load compared to meals with a low-glycemic load in overweight women. This was contrary to expected results: that high-glycemic meals would stimulate higher release of monocytes. More research into this area is necessary, the researchers concluded, since obesity, insulin resistance and heart disease are often associated with a high-glycemic load diet, which includes refined sugars and processed foods.

Reasons Seniors Might Use Drugs or Alcohol

The National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Inc. reports that trouble coping with changes, children moving out, and no longer having a job are significant factors that can result in addictive behavior in seniors. Memory loss, confusion, depression and mood changes can all be signs that an addiction is active. For seniors, the same symptoms that can indicate an alcohol or drug addiction can also indicate an early development of dementia or other cognitive issues.

Why Drug or Alcohol Addiction Is Often Misdiagnosed in Seniors

A Guide To Understanding And Helping Seniors Overcome Substance Use Disorders

Drug or alcohol addiction is often misdiagnosed because the symptoms look like other health conditions one would expect to see in a senior. In addition, seniors are less likely to report significant alcohol consumption or to admit to abusing illegal substances. Although “6-11% of elderly hospital admissions are a result of alcohol or drug problems”, it can be difficult to pinpoint which cases these are. Seniors who go to the doctor frequently for complaints that have no identifiable cause should be screened for alcohol or drug addiction, yet not many are. Lack of training in the signs of addiction in seniors will lead many health care providers to diagnose issues with dementia, memory loss, diabetes, or depression without getting to the root cause that is addiction.

When a Senior Needs Addiction Treatment

There are times when a senior is going to need addiction treatment in order to stop abusing substances. The goal for anyone struggling with addiction is the same, to stop relying on drugs or alcohol to begin living a healthier life. The treatment should be empathetic, with a clear message that addiction can be treated no matter the age of the person.

Some treatment providers don’t focus on addiction with seniors with the thought that it’s too late for treatment or it is not worth treating seniors for addiction. This is not fair for seniors who have an addiction that can be treated, as the quality of life for them can greatly improve. It doesn’t matter how much time a person may have left, as the quality of life should matter the most.

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, “While substance abuse in older adults often goes unrecognized and therefore untreated, research indicates that currently available addiction treatment programs can be as effective for them as younger adults.” It is important not to minimize the effects of substance abuse on the overall wellness of an individual, no matter what age they are. Treatment for addiction in seniors is both effective and important, giving seniors a better chance at living a healthy life.

How Treatment is Provided for Senior Substance Abuse

Any senior who comes forward wanting help for an addiction should be treated with empathy and respect. The communication should be clear and look at the variety of issues a senior may regularly face. It is when you take into consideration the way in which you communicate with an elderly individual and how you present topics, that treatment will be a different.

It is important to rule out any medical causes of the symptoms that are present. Substance abuse may not be the answer to a senior’s complaints of pain, confusion or depression. The loss of a spouse, job, or no longer being able to drive can all lead a one down a path of depression that is not caused by substance abuse. Careful evaluation is necessary to rule out underlying health problems in conjunction with screening for substance abuse issues.

Like anyone who is struggling with an addiction, seniors will benefit from a supportive atmosphere. When clients are able to talk about their struggles with addiction openly in a professional, empathetic atmosphere, true recovery can occur. It isn’t easy to admit you struggle with an addiction, but the help you find at a professional treatment center is worth taking the risk. Through peer support and learning relapse prevention strategies, seniors can withdraw safely from substances and move forward in their lives in a healthier way. Education around safe practices is important for anyone who needs help with addiction, but particularly true for seniors who may need a number of prescription medications to control health conditions.

When seniors learn about the effects drugs or alcohol are having on their cognition or physical abilities, they are better able to make sound decisions around drug or alcohol use. Some seniors start drinking “to take the edge off” without realizing their behavior is out of their control. Education can go a long way in helping a senior who has an addiction better understand what is going on with their health when they abuse substances.

Treatment Begins with Supervised Detox

The first step in any recovery program for seniors is to detox safely from the drugs or alcohol. This can be more complicated for seniors, who are overall less healthy than younger people and more susceptible to harsh symptoms of withdrawal. While people of any age experience withdrawal symptoms, the effects can be more detrimental for a senior who is trying to withdraw from substances.

After detox, it’s important to continue working on the emotional and behavioral pieces of addiction to gain a better handle on sobriety as a whole. A senior may be surprised to learn that they have an addiction and may not have realized the danger they were putting themselves in by mixing certain medications with alcohol.

Treatment providers are not always clear with seniors regarding medications and alcohol consumption. The thought that it’s too late for help is prevalent among treatment for seniors and is not the best way to manage addiction.

Medication interactions with both alcohol and illegal substances are a common reason for emergency room visits, especially for those who take more than one type of medication. Individual therapy is always recommended for anyone who struggles with addiction. Therapy provides seniors with a person to talk to who is going to have a neutral position when it comes to their substance use issues.

While a senior may have trouble talking to a family member or friend about their addiction, a therapist is easier to talk to. Seniors need to have a safe person to talk to when it comes to an addiction and treatment.

Treatment for addiction in seniors is not only possible, it is essential to the health and well-being of those living with addiction who are older. The best facilities offer seniors a safe, supportive environment to learn more about addiction and withdraw from substances effectively.The treatment involves working closely with a counselor, attending group sessions, and learning about the effects that drugs or alcohol can have on the mind and body. Through a careful look at personal habits and attitudes, it is possible to recover from addiction no matter what age an individual is.

Reasons Seniors Might Use Drugs or Alcohol

The reasons seniors might turn to drugs or alcohol are universal. Many recovery facilities treat seniors who began using substances out of loneliness after a loss of a spouse, siblings or friends. Seniors are at a higher risk for isolation, and this can bring out addictive behavior in some individuals. As navigating life becomes more difficult, some turn to drugs or alcohol for comfort. Like other adults, some seniors become addicted to prescription pain killers and don’t know how to stop or even realize they have an addiction to overcome.

What Drug or Alcohol Addiction Looks Like with Seniors

Drug or alcohol addiction among seniors generally has a subtler appearance. While a working adult might struggle getting to work each day or show signs of physical health problems, an older adult doesn’t generally have a tight schedule to keep. Drug or alcohol addiction signs can be easier to miss, as older adults are also showing signs of deteriorating health because of age.

Signs that a senior is struggling with a drug or alcohol addiction include:

    • Habitual drinking that is a routine that can’t be broken.
    • Drinking at home alone or using substances in private. Using medications off-label and requiring additional prescriptions. A senior may state that a pain medication has been lost or stolen in an effort to get more.
    • Newly developed depression or a lack of interest in regular activities. While loss of ability can lead to a lack of interest in participating in activities, so can substance abuse.
    • Frequent trips to medical providers complaining of pain that does not have an identifiable source.
    • Chronic use of sleep aids or tranquilizers.
    • Getting intoxicated despite serious prescription medication warnings.
    • Confusion or memory loss that comes and goes with no clear reason why.

Keeping our brain healthy from birth to 100

Keeping our brain healthy from birth to 100

December 1,2018 at JCC in Palo Alto California

Speakers and event sponsors are welcome. All older adults are invited.

2-5pm, Bldg D room

Tips for healthy brain

Other speakers:
Connie Dello Buono – Health blogger and Motherhealth caregivers founder at www.clubalthea.com

Contact motherhealth@gmail.com for details or text 408-854-1883

Oshman Family Jewish Community Center, Room in Building D.

bldg D.JPG

Flyer

flyer dec 1

 

 

Alcohol causes gut damage with bacteria entering the blood stream

Eat whole foods or nuts rich in magnesium, potassium and calcium before drinking alcohol late afternoon.  Always have protein when drinking. Alcohol facilitates aging.

Connie

How Alcohol Ruins Your Health

By Dr Mercola

Acutely, alcohol depresses your central nervous system, which slows down the communication between your brain cells. Your limbic system, which controls emotions, is also affected. This is why alcohol consumption lowers your inhibitions.

Your prefrontal cortex, a brain region associated with reasoning and judgment, also slows in response to alcohol, leading to more impulsive behavior and poor judgment.

At higher doses, your cerebellum, which plays a role in muscle activity, will also be impacted, leading to dizziness and loss of balance. Over time — even over as short a period as one month — alcohol:4,5,6

Increases liver stiffness, which increases your risk of liver cirrhosis. In the film, after one month, the liver stiffness of the binge-drinking brother was increased from 3.9 to 4.9 — a 25 percent increase in liver inflammation that leads to cirrhosis.

The moderate-drinking brother fared nearly as badly. His liver stiffness increased from 3.9 to 4.8, so spreading the drinks out did not make any significant difference in terms of the liver damage caused by 21 units of alcohol per week.

Diminishes the formation of memories due to ethanol buildup in the brain. This is why you may not remember what you did while you were drunk. Alcohol also causes your hippocampus to shrink, which affects memory and learning.

Promotes systemic inflammation. The two brothers both had significant increases in five different inflammatory markers, although binge drinking caused a more dramatic rise.

Studies have shown even a single binge causes a dramatic rise in inflammation. In other words, your body reacts to alcohol in the same way as it reacts to injury or infection.

Increases stress on your heart, raising your risk for cardiomyopathy, arrhythmias, high blood pressure and stroke.

Blood alcohol levels spike two to three hours AFTER your last drink, which means it may occur in the middle of the night during sleep. This raises your risk of accidental death due to choking on your own vomit and/or suffering cardiac failure or stroke while sleeping.

Significantly increases endotoxin levels. In other words, alcohol causes gut damage allowing bacteria to escape from your gut into your blood stream.

The film showed that bingeing caused significantly worse damage, suggesting one week between binges is nowhere near enough to heal the gut damage caused by high amounts of alcohol. That said, regular consumption also led to elevated endotoxin levels, suggesting 21 units of alcohol per week is too much, and “sensible” drinking limits likely need to be much lower. How low is still unclear.

These are just a handful of the physical effects of alcohol. In reality, alcohol affects every part of your body, as shown in this Healthline infographic.7 In terms of chronic disease, studies have linked excessive alcohol consumption with an increased risk for poor immune function (which raises your risk for most diseases), pancreatitis and cancer.

Blood magnesium levels , dementia and alcohol

When you really want a small taste of your alcohol, drink it 5 to 7 hours before bedtime. Most seniors sleep at 11pm so that would be 4pm in the afternoon for his favorite diluted Martini.

Connie Dello Buono

Image shows a wine glass.

LOW LEVELS OF ALCOHOL MAY BE GOOD FOR THE BRAIN

According to researchers, a small alcoholic drink each day may be beneficial for brain health. Using mice, researchers found low levels of alcohol consumption is associated with less brain inflammation and a more effective glymphatic system. This allows CSF to flow more efficiently through the brain and remove waste that can lead to neurodegenerative diseases. READ MORE…

What Are the Links between Alcohol and Dementia?

While dementia can be idiopathic (from no specific source), there are several sub-types that can be linked directly to alcohol use disorder. Learn more.

Alcohol-related brain damage (including Korsakoff’s syndrome …

Alcohol-related brain damage (ARBD) is a brain disorder caused by regularly drinking too muchalcohol over several years. The term ARBD covers several different conditions including Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome and alcoholic dementia. … However, in contrast to common causes of …

Alcohol and dementia: What’s the truth? – BBC News – BBC.com

Feb 21, 2018 – What do we know about the risks of dementia from drinking alcohol?

Korsakoff Syndrome | Signs, Symptoms, & Diagnosis

Korsakoff syndrome, often associated with alcoholism, is a dementia related to Alzheimer’s disease. Learn about Korsakoff symptoms and treatment … Korsakoff syndrome is most commonly caused byalcohol misuse, but certain other conditions also can cause the syndrome. About; Symptoms; Diagnosis; Causes & risks …

About · ‎Symptoms · ‎Diagnosis

An Overview of Alcoholic Dementia – Verywell Mind

https://www.verywellmind.com › Disorders › Addiction › Alcohol Use

Feb 15, 2018 – Excessive drinking over a period of years may lead to a condition known as alcoholic dementia (formally described as alcohol-induced major neurocognitive disorder in the DSM 5), which can cause problems with memory, learning, and other cognitive skills.

Alcohol Induced Dementia | Does Alcohol Cause Dementia?

https://www.therecoveryvillage.com › Alcoholism and Alcohol Addiction

Jan 25, 2018 – Some studies and research show the potential for alcohol-induced dementia, and details of this condition are below.

Alcohol-related dementia – Wikipedia

Alcohol-related dementia (ARD) is a form of dementia caused by long-term, excessive consumption ofalcoholic beverages, resulting in neurological damage and impaired cognitive function. Contents. [hide]. 1 Terminology; 2 Signs and symptoms; 3 Pathophysiology; 4 Diagnosis. 4.1 Diagnostic criteria. 5 Treatment; 6 …

Contribution of alcohol use disorders to the burden of dementia in …

by M Schwarzinger – ‎2018 – ‎Cited by 4

Feb 20, 2018 – Dementia is a prevalent condition, affecting 5–7% of people aged 60 years and older, and a leading cause of disability in people aged 60 years and older globally. We aimed to examine the association between alcohol use disorders and dementia risk, with an emphasis on early-onsetdementia (<65 …

Alcohol use disorder is a ‘major risk factor’ for dementia

Feb 21, 2018 – In a large-scale study, links between alcohol use disorder and dementia are fleshed out. The relationship is stronger than previously thought.

Excessive alcohol use linked to early-onset dementia risk – CNN

Feb 21, 2018 – Excessive alcohol use could increase your risk for all types of dementia, particularly early-onset dementia, according to a new study.

Frequent alcohol use kills new brain cells in adults: women more vulnerable

Image shows a wine glass.

LOW LEVELS OF ALCOHOL MAY BE GOOD FOR THE BRAIN

According to researchers, a small alcoholic drink each day may be beneficial for brain health. Using mice, researchers found low levels of alcohol consumption is associated with less brain inflammation and a more effective glymphatic system. This allows CSF to flow more efficiently through the brain and remove waste that can lead to neurodegenerative diseases. READ MORE…
Image shows a woman looking at a drink of whiskey.

STUDY POKES HOLES IN FETAL ALCOHOL HYPOTHESIS

A new study challenges conventional beliefs about fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. Researchers discovered no differences in microglia activity in the brains of health mice and those exposed to alcohol during early development. The study brings into question the whether the brain’s immune system cells are to blame for the neurological damage that occurs as a result of fetal alcohol exposure. READ MORE…
Image shows a person behind smashed glass.

BRAIN INJURY IN KIDS MIGHT LEAD TO ALCOHOL ABUSE

According to a new Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience study, children who experienced TBI under the age of 5 were 3.6 times more likely to have problems with substance abuse as teens. Finding suggest traumatic brain injuries during early life could be a risk factor for alcohol abuse later in life. READ MORE…