Sensory signals of Epilepsy and natural therapies

Epilepsy

Natural and Complementary Therapies

Many natural compounds also affect the brain and may be able to influence epilepsy; natural compounds will likely be most beneficial as adjuvants to conventional therapies.

Vitamins and Minerals

Epilepsy patients should also be aware that long-term use of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) can negatively affect their vitamin and mineral status. For instance, patients taking anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) have significantly lower levels of vitamin D in their blood (Menon and Harinarayan 2010, Shellhaas and Joshi 2010, Pack 2004, Valsamis et al. 2006, Mintzer S et al 2006). This is because many AEDs increase the activity of a liver enzyme known as cytochrome P450, which also breaks down vitamin D. Vitamin D is essential for the absorption of calcium; consequently, patients taking AEDS absorb less calcium in their diet, which increases their risk of developing osteoporosis. Patients who are taking AEDs may need to take vitamin D and calcium supplements (Fong et al. 2011).

Anti-epileptic drugs have also been shown to reduce levels of several B vitamins, including folate and vitamins B6 and B12 (Sener et al. 2006Linnebank et al. 2011) These vitamins are critical for controlling metabolism in the body; low levels of these vitamins can also lead to low red blood cell levels, causing fatigue and pallor. One of the most serious consequences of the low folate levels caused by AEDs is high levels of the compound homocysteine, a risk factor for heart disease (Sener et al. 2006; Kurul et al 2007, Apeland et al 2001). Elevated levels of homocysteine have been implicated in the increased risk of heart disease seen in epileptics. Moreover, some studies have indicated that elevated homocysteine may contribute to AED resistance or increase seizures in epileptics (Diaz-Arrastia 2000). Based on these findings, some researchers call for routine supplementation with the B vitamins, especially the metabolically active form of folic acid, L-methylfolate, to reduce homocysteine levels (Morrell MJ 2002). Folate deficiencies can also lead to seizures, particularly in infants. Impaired folate transport in the body can be a cause of seizures that do not respond well to typical treatments (Djukic A 2007). In addition, epileptics often have reduced folic acid levels, possibly due to the use of AEDs (Asadi-Pooya 2005). Doctors of epileptics should routinely monitor folic acid, vitamin B12 and homocysteine levels in patients to help prevent an increased risk of cardiovascular disease that could otherwise be treated.

Some forms of epilepsy are directly linked to vitamin B6 deficiencies; these convulsions, known as pyridoxine-dependent seizures, can only be treated with high doses of vitamin B6 (Asadi-Pooya 2008). Low vitamin B6 levels are also associated with general epilepsy. Even in patients without pyridoxine-dependent seizures, low levels of pyridoxine might increase seizure sensitivity, although more research needs to be done to determine if pyridoxine can treat seizures (Gaby 2007). Some types of seizures cannot be treated with pyridoxine, but they can be effectively managed with pyridoxal-5-phosphate, the biologically active form of vitamin B6 (Tamura et al. 2000, Jiao et al. 1997, Wang et al. 2005).

Antioxidants, such as vitamin Evitamin C and selenium are able to mitigate mitochondrial oxidative stress in the brain and other tissues, lowering seizure frequency in various types of epilepsy (Tamai et al. 1988, Zaidi et al. 2004, Savaskan et al. 2003, Yamamoto et al. 2002, Ogunmekan et al. 1979, 1989 and 1985). Animal models have shown that alpha-tocopherol alone is able to prevent several types of seizures (Levy et al 1990; Levy et al 1992). Epileptics are also more likely to have low vitamin E levels, though this may be a result of taking anti-epileptic drugs (Higashi et al. 1980).

Magnesium helps maintain connections between neurons. It has been shown to suppress EEG activity and limit seizure severity in animal models, and magnesium deficiency is associated with seizures in humans (Oladipo 2007; Nuytten et al 1991, Borges et al. 1978). Within the body, ionic magnesium acts as a natural calcium channel blocker, offsetting the excitatory influence of ionic calcium in a manner similar to the calcium channel blocker class of conventional AEDs (Touyz 1991). Moreover, magnesium levels decline sharply following seizures in patients with idiopathic epilepsy (Gupta 1994). In fact, intravenous or intramuscular magnesium is often administered to women to safely prevent eclampsia, a pregnancy-associated disorder characterized by seizures (Bhattacharjee 2011).

A recently developed form of magnesium, known as magnesium-L-threonate, may be particularly effective in epilepsy and other neurological disorders. This form of magnesium appears to be better at penetrating the blood-brain barrier and thus is more efficiently delivered to brain cells (Slutsky et al. 2010, Abumaria et al. 2011). In fact, in an animal model, magnesium-L-threonate boosted magnesium levels in spinal fluid by an impressive 15% compared to virtually no increase with conventional magnesium. Moreover, oral magnesium-L-threonate was able to modulate learning and memory, indicating that it does indeed impact the central nervous system (Abumaria 2011).

Thiamine, manganese and biotin are often low in epileptics as well (Gaby 2007).

Melatonin plays an important role in the brain, particularly in regulating the brain’s sleep-wake cycle. It also exerts a calming effect at the neuronal level by reducing glutaminergic (excitatory) signaling and augmenting GABAergic (inhibitory) signaling (Banach et al. 2011). Melatonin is widely used as a sleep aid and to treat jet lag; the side effects of taking melatonin are mild and it is one of the most commonly used supplements in the United States. Animal models have shown that melatonin can be effective in reducing epileptic seizures (Lima et al. 2011, Costa-Latufo et al. 2002). Melatonin has also been beneficial in humans with epilepsy and is particularly effective in the treatment of cases of juvenile epilepsy that do not respond well to anti-epileptic drugs (AED’s) (Banach et al. 2011). Due to its widespread use and minimal side effects, melatonin has potential to improve control of epilepsy (Fauteck et al. 1999).

Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids (PUFAs), such as omega-3 fatty acids, are a type of essential fat that play an important role in maintaining central nervous system health. Animal studies have suggested that PUFAs, including omega-3 and some omega-6 fatty acids, may be able to modulate neuronal excitability (Blondeau et al. 2002, Taha et al. 2010). This is further supported by the fact that children on the ketogenic diet often have higher levels of PUFAs in their cerebrospinal fluid, which suggests that increased PUFA levels is one of the ways that the ketogenic diet prevents seizures (Xu et al. 2008, Auvin 2011). Clinical trials in adults have yielded mixed results. In one such study, 57 epileptic patients were given 1 g EPA and 0.7 g DHA daily. Seizure activity was reduced over the first six weeks, although the effect was temporary. The researchers called for more in-depth studies, with larger doses and larger observational groups (Yuen AW et al 2005). However, a randomized controlled trial did not find that fish oil reduced seizure frequency; although, the study did find, that PUFAs reduced seizures when administered in an open-label format, meaning when subjects knew that they were not receiving a placebo (Bromfeld et al. 2008). An ongoing National Institutes of Health-sponsored trial is examining the effects of fish oil on cardiac health in epileptics (ClinicalTrials.gov).

Life Extension suggests that the omega-6 to omega-3 ratio should be kept below 4 to 1 for optimal health. More information on testing and optimizing your omega-6 to omega-3 ratio can be found in the Life Extension Magazine article entitled “Optimize Your Omega-3 Status“.

Resveratrol, derived from red grapes and Japanese knotweed (Polygonum cuspidatum), and the plant Bacopa monnieri both appear to be promising in the management of seizure-related neurotoxicity. Resveratrol and bacopa-derived compounds have been extensively studied in experimental settings and consistently shown to guard against neuronal damage (Jyoti 2007; Hosamani 2009; Kanthasamy 2011; Chung 2011). In the context of epilepsy, numerous mechanisms by which resveratrol might prevent seizures have been proposed (Shetty 2011), and, indeed, in an animal model resveratrol prevented chemical-induced seizures (Wu 2009); though studies on epileptic humans have yet to be performed. Likewise, bacopa has been the subject of several animal model experiments, many of which have revealed a clear benefit relating to seizure frequency and post-seizure brain cell damage (Pandey 2010; Mathew 2010; Krishnakumar 2009). Nonetheless, bacopa also has yet to be studied in a controlled manner in a population of epileptic humans.

Phytocannabinoids (pCBs), which are compounds found in marijuana that closely resemble chemicals the body produces naturally called endocannabinoids, have shown great potential in the treatment of epilepsy. Phytocannabinoids can affect both the central and peripheral nervous system because neurons have receptors that respond directly to binding by cannabinoids. One of the major effects of pCBs is to reduce neuronal excitability by modulating electrical activity around synapses; as a result, these chemicals are sometimes referred to as potential “circuit breakers” for neurological disorders, including epilepsy (Wallace et al. 2003, Katona and Freund 2008). Therefore, researchers have been studying the effects of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other phytocannabinoids on the brain to try to develop new mechanisms for treating epilepsy (Hoffman and Frazier 2011, Hill et al 2012). One small clinical trial found that the phytocannabinoid, cannabidiol, did reduce seizures in epileptics who were already taking AEDs (Cunha et al 1980). Another study that was largely based on epidemiology found an association between marijuana use and decreased risk of seizure (Ng et al 1990). Moreover, it has been reported that patients treated for epilepsy subjectively feel that marijuana use helps eases their epilepsy (Gross et al 2004). More research is needed to determine the efficacy and safety of natural and synthetic cannabinoids for the treatment of seizures. A comprehensive review of studies examining the effects of cannabinoids on seizure frequency in humans is currently being carried out by the Cochrane Epilepsy Group (Gloss and Vickrey 2011). Marijuana is illegal except as a prescribed treatment for medical problems in certain states; Life Extension does not recommend consuming illegal drugs as a treatment for epilepsy. However, the benefits of these phytocannabinoids do suggest that marijuana-derived compounds may soon become an accepted form of therapy for epilepsy and other neurological disorders.

Lifestyle Modifications

Seizure Interruptions. Although auras do not occur in all individuals with seizure disorders, some people are aware of a change in their sensory perception (whether auditory, olfactory, sensory, visual, or gustatory, sometimes involving malaise, vertigo, or the sense of deja vu) that signals the onset of a seizure. Anecdotal reports indicate that some people have learned to interrupt their seizure process by replacing the aura-induced perception with another. In these individuals, the aura is a known signal of seizure onset. For example, if the aura is a smell or unpleasant odor, these individuals can often interrupt the seizure by immediately smelling something else (in general, something with a more pleasing smell than the aura).

Some people are able to take the interruption technique a step further. By simply relying on mental imagery (e.g., remembering a pleasant, positive smell), they can arrest a seizure. Some find that anger can effectively interrupt a seizure; they are able to arrest their seizures by yelling at them. Other individuals who have seizures with an observable onset pattern enlist a support person to shout at them or give them a quick shake when the pattern commences. The techniques that successfully “interrupt” an aura vary from patient to patient and must be performed at a specific time to stop the seizure (Wolf 1994). However, the use of aura interruption may be able to help reduce or eliminate seizures (Elsas et al. 2011).

Stress Reduction Getting a good night’s sleep on a regular basis is a very important component of seizure prevention. Some scientists hypothesize that one major function of REM sleep is to reduce the brain’s susceptibility to epileptogenic influences (Jaseja H 2004). Stress reduction and relaxation techniques such as meditation may also aid in reducing seizures (Swinehart 2008).

Physical exercise can also be an important way to relieve stress that may be particularly beneficial for epileptics. Not only can exercise reduce stress, improve social integration and improve quality of life, regular physical exercise may directly help reduce seizure frequency (Arida et al. 2010). Physical exercise may “desensitize” neurons to emotional stress, helping avert seizures brought on by other triggers (Arida et al. 2009).

Biofeedback, another relaxation technique, can also be helpful. When the autonomic nervous system (or the involuntary nervous system) is in a state of overarousal, the likelihood of seizure activity can increase. Biofeedback is a technique that uses displays of some form of biological monitoring, such as an EEG, to help patients identify how their body responds to certain situations. By observing changes in EEG readings, patients are able to learn how to partially control the electrical activity in their brains and can develop the ability to reduce their risk of having seizures. Although most clinical trials involving biofeedback have been small (Tozzo CA et al 1988; Andrews DJ et al 1992; Ramaratnam S et al 2001), a comprehensive review of many studies found that biofeedback can provide significant relief for epileptics, particularly those that have not had success with anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) (Tan et al. 2009). On average, almost 75 percent of people who try EEG biofeedback for epilepsy will experience fewer seizures. Biofeedback using other biologic responses, such as slow cortical potential feedback and galvanic skin response has also been promising (Nagai 2011).

Other behavioral interventions may reduce seizure frequency as well. Yoga can improve quality of life and result in fewer seizures (Lundgren et al. 2008, Khan et al. 2010) Acupuncture may also be helpful in seizure prevention. A thorough review of published trials found that acupuncture may be beneficial, but that more and better designed studies need to be done (Cheuk 2008). Studies of the benefits of other relaxation techniques and cognitive behavioral therapy have also found a possible benefit (Ramaratnam 2004).

https://www.lifeextension.com/Protocols/Neurological/Epilepsy/Page-02

Music therapy for all health issues

music thera.JPGMUSIC THERAPY IN ACTION

Music has shown positive effects in a variety of patient populations for improving symptoms related to different diseases and disorders. Here’s a sampling of some of the more common uses of music therapy.

PATIENT POPULATION NONMUSIC BEHAVIORS
Autism spectrum disorder Movement, communication, speech and language, social skills, attention, cognition, activities of daily living
Alzhteimer’s disease and dementia Memory, mood, social interaction
Traumatic brain injury Movement, communication, speech and language, social skills, attention, memory, cognition
Mental health and mood disorders Self-esteem, awareness of self and environment, expression, reality testing, social skills, attention, cognition
Pain management Anxiety and stress, mood, feelings of control
Cancer Anxiety and stress, mood, feelings of control, coping skills
Movement disorders and stroke Movement, speech and language, swallowing , respiratory control,
memory, cognition
Hospice Anxiety and stress, mood, feelings of control, coping skills

Elizabeth Stegemöller is a board-certified music therapist and neuroscientist at Iowa State University, where she studies the effects of music on movement and associated neurophysiology in persons with Parkinson’s disease.

How Red Light Therapy Works

How Red Light Therapy Works

Visible red light is capable of penetrating the skin to a depth of about 8 to 10 mm. Once absorbed, the light energy is converted to cellular energy, stimulating the body’s natural processes on a cellular level and kicking off a whole series of metabolic events, including:

  • Increased circulation and the formation of new capillaries. 1
  • Increased lymph system activity.
  • Increased production of collagen and fibroblasts. 2
  • Increased release of ATP, or raw cellular energy. 3
  • Increased phagocytosis, or cellular clean up.
  • Tissue granulation stimulated. 4
  • Inflammation reduced. 5

All of these things work together to produce many benefits for you in the areas of anti-aging, the healing of wounds and injuries, and the relief of pain, as we’ll see below. But no matter what the application, red and infrared light therapy share the same benefits overall.

Red Light Therapy For Your Skin

By far the most popular use for red light therapy is anti-aging of the skin. If that’s why you’re here, please visit this page to learn exactly how red light is going to make you look younger. But before you go, it’s important to know that red light therapy can be used to treat a growing list of skin conditions including:

  • acne
  • rosacea
  • eczema
  • psoriasis
  • cold sores and herpes
  • everyday cuts, scrapes burns & bruises

Visit this page for more information on red light therapy for skin conditions.

The Wavelengths of Red Light Therapy

Red light therapy uses wavelengths of light roughly between 620 nm and 700 nm. Popular wavelengths used in research and in-home products are 630 nm and 660 nm.  Regardless of claims of only “specific wavelengths” being effective, the whole range of visible red light wavelengths are effective and beneficial.  In fact, many devices today are including two or three of them instead of just one. 

The Wavelengths of Red Light Therapy

Red LED Light Therapy

A red LED diode. What red LED light therapy used to be powered by.
Old style LED diode. What red light therapy used to be powered by.

Red LED light therapy is very popular today, especially for anti-agingacne and rosacea treatment. What’s so special about it? Red LED light therapy is red light therapy, just using an LED light source instead of incandescent, fluorescent, or laser. But red LED light therapy does have some unique benefits of its own.

LEDs were NASA’s choice for red light therapy when it brought the technique into space around the year 2000. They chose this technology for its low energy requirements, as well as its low heat emission and light weight.

Those same qualities made later research more accurate, and, to date, hundreds of studies from around the world have shown the benefits of red light therapy in the fields of anti-aginghealing, and pain relief.

What makes Red LED Light Therapy different?

1. Tighter Wavelength Span. Red LED light has a tighter wavelength span than other types of bulbs. For example, while a fluorescent or incandescent red light might have a 660nm peak, they could include wavelengths of plus or minus 40nm or more. However, in the case of red LED light with the same 660nm peak, the useful wavelengths are only plus or minus about 10nm. For this reason, some consider LEDs a superior vehicle for delivering the necessary light for a given application.

High Power LED Chip on Board Technology for red LED light therapy.
Newer, High Power LED Chip on Board Technology

2. No heat. There is very little heat generated with red LED light therapy, which makes the technique safer and more pleasant.

3. Durable & Long Lasting. Today’s LED devices use solid state electronics and plastic or metal housing which is much more durable and long lasting than incandescent or fluorescent bulbs made of glass.

4. Compact & Portable. LEDs are tiny little things, so it’s easy to pack them into a small, hand-held, portable device.

5. Earth Friendly. Red LED light therapy is more eco-friendly than using incandescent or fluorescent bulbs because they can produce the same amount of light but do so while using a small fraction of the energy.

That’s it! Those are the major things that make red LED light therapy any different or better than red light therapy from any other light source.

Effective red light therapy can be accomplished with any red light source including incandescent, halogen, fluorescent, LED, low level laser or cold laser. Each type of light has its benefits and drawbacks, but ineffectiveness is not one of them.

 

DMSO, hydrogen peroxide and Vit C fight cancer cells

Increase your cell nutrients (positive outcome from your gene expression with selected nutrients also in PDR – Physician Desk  Reference and see Youtube Dr Oz Pharmanex scanner which validates the supplements from this store) , email motherhealth@gmail.com to own this store for you:
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DMSO

You might ask your oncologist why your chances of survival are only 3% (ignoring all of their statistical gibberish such as “5-year survival rates” and deceptive terms like “remission” and “response”), when your chance of survival would be over 90% if they used DMSO.

It would be better for medical doctors to treat cancer patients with the right treatment than to have patients treat themselves at home. Medical doctors can diagnose better, treat better, watch for developing problems better, etc. Unfortunately, doctors are using treatments that have been chosen solely on the basis of their profitability rather than their effectiveness.

DMSO is a highly non-toxic, 100% natural product that comes from the wood industry. But of course, like so many other potential cancer cures, the discovery was buried. DMSO, being a natural product, cannot be patented and cannot be made profitable because it is produced by the ton in the wood industry. The only side-effect of using DMSO in humans is body odor (which varies from patient to patient).

Your complete DNA sequence will help shape the future of medicine

The FDA took note of the effectiveness of DMSO at treating pain and made it illegal for medical uses in order to protect the profits of the aspirin companies (in those days aspirin was used to treat arthritis). Thus, it must be sold today as a “solvent.” Few people can grasp the concept that government agencies are organized for the sole purpose of being the “police force” of large, corrupt corporations.

While it is generally believed that orthodox medicine and modern corrupt politicians persecute alternative medicine, this is not technically correct. What they do is persecute ANY cure for cancer, it doesn’t matter whether it is orthodox or alternative. The proof of this is DMSO. It appears that orthodox medicine persecutes alternative medicine only because there are far more alternative cancer treatments that can cure cancer than orthodox treatments.

Folic acid

Another substance that targets cancer cells is being researched at Purdue University and other places: folic acid. This too will be buried unless it can lead to more profitable cancer treatments.

But alternative medicine is rightfully not interested in combining DMSO with chemotherapy. DMSO will combine with many substances, grab them, and drag them into cancer cells. It will also blast through the blood-brain barrier like it wasn’t even there.

DMSO has been combined successfully with hydrogen peroxide (e.g. see Donsbach), cesium chloride, MSM (though it may not bind to MSM), and other products.

DMSO – Vitamin C Treatment

Vitamin C is so simlar to glucose, that cells, and especially cancer cells, consume vitamin C the same way they would consume glucose.

Cancer cells are anaerobic obligates, which means they depend upon glucose as their primary source of metabolic fuel. Cancer cells employ transport mechanisms called glucose transporters to actively pull in glucose.

In the vast majority of animals, vitamin C is synthesized from glucose in only four metabolic steps. Hence, the molecular shape of vitamin C is remarkably similar to glucose. Cancer cells will actively transport vitamin C into themselves, possibly because they mistake it for glucose. Another plausible explanation is that they are using the vitamin C as an antioxidant. Regardless, the vitamin C accumulates in cancer cells.

If large amounts of vitamin C are presented to cancer cells, large amounts will be absorbed. In these unusually large concentrations, the antioxidant vitamin C will start behaving as a pro-oxidant as it interacts with intracellular copper and iron. This chemical interaction produces small amounts of hydrogen peroxide.

Because cancer cells are relatively low in an intracellular anti-oxidant enzyme called catalase, the high dose vitamin C induction of peroxide will continue to build up until it eventually lyses the cancer cell from the inside out! This effectively makes high dose IVC a non-toxic chemotherapeutic agent that can be given in conjunction with conventional cancer treatments. Based on the work of several vitamin C pioneers before him, Dr. Riordan was able to prove that vitamin C was selectively toxic to cancer cells if given intravenously. This research was recently reproduced and published by Dr. Mark Levine at the National Institutes of Health.

As feared by many oncologists, small doses may actually help the cancer cells because small amounts of vitamin C may help the cancer cells arm themselves against the free-radical induced damage caused by chemotherapy and radiation. Only markedly higher doses of vitamin C will selectively build up as peroxide in the cancer cells to the point of acting in a manner similar to chemotherapy. These tumor-toxic dosages can only be obtained by intravenous administration.

Over a span of 15 years of vitamin C research, Dr. Riordan’s RECNAC (cancer spelled backwards) research team generated 20 published papers on vitamin C and cancer. RECNAC even inspired its second cancer research institute, known as RECNAC II, at the University of Puerto Rico. This group recently published an excellent paper in Integrative Cancer Therapies, titled “Orthomolecular Oncology Review: Ascorbic Acid and Cancer 25 Years Later.” RECNAC data has shown that vitamin C is toxic to tumor cells without sacrificing the performance of chemotherapy.

Intravenous vitamin C also does more than just kill cancer cells. It boosts immunity. It can stimulate collagen formation to help the body wall off the tumor. It inhibits hyaluronidase, an enzyme that tumors use to metastasize and invade other organs throughout the body. It induces apoptosis to help program cancer cells into dying early. It corrects the almost universal scurvy in cancer patients. Cancer patients are tired, listless, bruise easily, and have a poor appetite. They don’t sleep well and have a low threshold for pain. This adds up to a very classic picture of scurvy that generally goes unrecognized by their conventional physicians.

Because cancer cells consume 15 times more glucose than normal cells, under the right conditions, cancer cells should consume 15 times more vitamin C than a normal cell. While normal cells benefit from vitamin C, the microbes inside of the cancer cells may be killed by vitamin C. It is microbes which are inside of the cancer cells which cause cancer and which force a cancer cell to remain cancerous.
It should be mentioned that two-time Nobel Prize winner Linus Pauling, and an associate, Dr. Ewan Cameron, M.D., were able to extend the lives of cancer patients more than 10-fold using only 10 grams of vitamin C a day by I.V.
This protocol will modify the Pauling/Cameron protocol four different ways:
1) It will include DMSO in the evening dose to help Vitamin C target cancer cells and get inside of cancer cells,
2) It includes a very, very low glucose diet so that the cancer cells will feast on Vitamin C instead of glucose,
3) It includes 15% or less potassium ascorbate, which has a special affinity for cancer cells,
4) It will include as little sodium ascorbate (or other sodium forms of Vitamin C) as possible because these types of Vitamin C do not get inside of cancer cells very well.
Regarding the use of potassium ascorbate, a foundation in Italy has proven that potassium ascorbate can be used to cure cancer (WARNING: no more than 15% of the Vitmain C you take should be a potassium version!!). See: Pantellini Foundation (Italy)

WARNING

Do NOT use potassium ascorbate or any other form of potassium as your primary source of Vitamin C!!! If you use potassium ascorbate work with the vendor of this product to insure you are taking safe doses relative to non-potassium forms of Vitamin C!!! If your vendor does not make a recommendation, then use 15% as the maximum portion of Vitamin C that is a potassium form!!
The second thing this treatment uses is DMSO. DMSO is used to “open” the ports on the cancer cells to assist getting vitamin C inside the cancer cells. DMSO is very well known to target cancer cells and open their ports. To better understand this concept see this article.

In summary, there are three things that help get the vitamin C inside the cancer cells:
1) Cancer cells consume 15 times more glucose than normal cells and cancer cells cannot tell the difference between glucose and vitamin C.
2) The use of potassium ascorbate as a part of the Vitamin C protocol.
3) The use of DMSO.
A fourth unique thing about this protocol is the “cancer diet.” The cancer diet for this treatment focuses on a LOW GLUCOSE cancer diet. In this way, the cancer cells have less glucose to interfere with their consumption of vitamin C!

Possible Swelling and Inflammation

There are two possible results when large amounts of vitamin C get inside of a cancer cell. First, the vitamin C can kill the microbe(s) inside the cancer cell and the cell will safely revert into a normal cell; or second, the vitamin C can kill the cancer cell itself.

While the first of these two options will not cause any swelling or inflammation, the second option may cause swelling and inflammation.
For this reason, anyone on this protocol who would be put at risk by swelling and/or inflammation (e.g. in a tumor), should carefully and slowly build-up to the theraputic dose of vitamin C, watching carefully for any potential swelling or inflammation.

Details of the Treatment

Many people have difficulties working with DMSO. In some cases, when taken transdermally (through the skin) there is a skin rash which is simply too severe to continue the treatment. When you get your bottle of DMSO put one drop on your skin, spread it around a little bit and see if you have an allergic reaction (i.e. severe rash). If not, an hour later put 10 drops on your skin and spread it thin.

If you do have a reaction, you may still be able to take the DMSO orally (added to 4 ounces of water). But if you cannot take the DMSO orally, and you have a skin reaction to the DMSO, you will have to abandon this treatment.

If you want to know more about DMSO, see this website:
http://www.dmso.org/articles/information/muir.htm

The Importance of the DMSO

This treatment uses DMSO (in the evening) and vitamin C (twice a day). The theory of this treatment is that the DMSO will be used first (in the evening dose), either taken orally (with water) or transdermally (through the skin). In about 10 minutes the DMSO will have targeted the cancer cells and will start “opening up” their ports.

In the evening dose, about ten minutes after taking the DMSO, the vitamin C will be taken with water. When the vitamin C gets to the cancer cells the cells natural affinity for consuming vitamin C (because the cancer cells “think” the vitamin C is glucose) should be enhanced by the fact that the cancer cells have been “opened up” by DMSO.

The theory is that the DMSO will allow a larger concentration of vitamin C to get inside the cancer cells than would normally occur.

As already mentioned, once vitamin C can get inside of a cancer cell the cell may revert into a normal cell or it may be killed. If enough cancer cells are killed, some swelling may occur.


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Why writing is therapeutic

most read 2most read 1

I discovered http://www.medium.com where you can write your story or any story that is close to your heart. It is therapeutic to write, as it helped me each day.

https://medium.com/@clubalthea.com/607e6a4a9329

I wrote about my grandma when she died.

I wrote about my heart aches to my ex before I filed for divorce.

I wrote about what I learned in my business to help others and myself and be focus.

I wrote about health as I also take care of my own and my mother’s health.

I wrote about baby care when I was taking care of my little ones.

I wrote about children and childbirth when I delivered my babies at home with midwives.

I wrote about women’s health as I had been coaching them about their bodies and holistic ways of healing.

I wrote about what is in my heart after the divorce to help other women.

Now, sharing feels good so share your stories. I will publish them here if you wish.

 

————————————–

Avoid the stress working in corporate job. Avoid market risks in your investments or retirement savings, call Connie for tax free savings, up to 13% return with health benefits (similar to long term care insurance).

Work for your own business as financial service consultant, call Connie 408-854-1883 motherhealth@gmail.com (in 50 US states).

Expressing Love Thru Your Dance

Listen to the beat of the drums. Listen to your heart beat, what does
it say. Close your eyes, what do you feel. Feel the palms and finger
tips of your dancing partner.

Dancing and having sex are related in the rhythms that they both
follow. There is less affection in dancing but each one enjoys the
moment of musical dance and magic.

There maybe two kinds of dances: ballroom smooth and latin rhythms. In
smooth ballroom, there is forceful stiff upper body emanating from the
woman while the latin rhythms have lots of hip swaying and erotic hip
movement and seductive walks. Whether it be International or American
style, we say we like the choices that is presented in the American
style.

There are of course other folk dances from different countries, all in
celebration of the earth, festivities, bonding in marriage or
seduction in courtship or love and romance. Each dance employs the
movement of the body to project the message that one wanted to convey.

Each move that we make in dancing is likened to the movement we make
when making love.

We take each step while following the lead of the man.

We show off our woman thru the dance, telling the world that she is
mine and I am hers.

We breath in the rhythms of each other’s breath.

We move toward or away from each other in same motion and beat, yet
our eyes are focused on each other’s sense of direction.

Each step we make in dancing is the same step we make in making love,
one step at a time. And then the music changes from its beat from slow
to fast and then to slow, we feel the beat of the music as we feel the
movement of our bodies when making love.

Expressing each others’ warm in ways we make love is expressing each
other’s beat in the way we dance with each other.

We take each dance step as if we are making love to the music,
listening to its cues.

We make love as if we listen to each other’s cues, drawing energy from
each other, in sync with each other’s motion and heat of the moment.

We express our togetherness in the rhythm of the music, we dance as one.

In dance, we show our love and hate all in one dance while in making
love, we show our passion all in one conscious moment. There is more
affection in the latter and less in dance.

In Two-Step, we feel the words in the music of love played just for
lovers to fall in love to each other again, as they dance in swaying
motion as if rocking each other to sleep.

In Bolero, we feel the romantic ballad as if each song of love comes
from within our being, swaying our hips and thrusting to each others
body yet flowing in one motion and then quickly turning to exhale.

In Swing, we dance like children and giddily enjoying the moment of
hand holding and turning.

In Cha-cha, we sway our hips as if we want to be cheek to cheek with our lover.

In Rumba, we tease our lover by the way we sway our hips forward and
backward as we move our legs.

In Paso Doble, we show our passion and submission in one dance

In Tango, we show our connectedness and oneness as our bodies hit each
other in one line, there is no ups and downs, there is only the
feeling of the bodies’ movement and direction.

In Waltz, we move up and down as if we are rocked to sleep

In Foxtrot, we are playful yet mindful of where we are going together.

In Samba, we throw our passion and love for each other showing the
thrust and energy we put in our legs and hips.

In Salsa, Merengue, or Cumbia, we stand tall but sway our bodies in sexy moves.

In Bachata, we locked each other’s legs as if we can never be separated.

We express our oneness in making love, moving and swaying in same
energy and heat of the moment.

In dancing, we learn to listen to the beat and move with the beat.

In having sex, we feel each other in a rhythm that is in sync with
each other, neither slow or fast, just right for both partners,
feeling each other’s bodies.

There is a big difference though when having sex and making love.

When making love, there is affection and pleasing one another is the norm.

There is cuddling and time is no limit. In the moment of passion, both
hearts are one, beating as one and feeling each other more. There is
a pledge of togetherness with each other, the moment is a significant
event, not just a bodily urge.

In having sex, there is also the feeling of each other’s bodies but
the heart is not one.

There is an emotional detachment to the outcome knowing that the
affair might not happen again.

There is the one time force which both hunger for but ready to not
experience again.

So, we choose our own moments. I choose making love and not having
sex. Most women crave for relationships for they know their bodies
well and can please them well too.

While most men crave for sex, only few experience the real power of making love.

written by Connie Dello Buono ; motherhealth@gmail.com
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