What is genetic testing?

Even when people have one copy of a dominant cancer-predisposing mutation, two copies of a recessive mutation, or, for males, one copy of an X-linked recessive mutation, they may not develop cancer. Some mutations are “incompletely penetrant,” which means that only some people will show the effects of these mutations. Mutations can also “vary in their expressivity,” which means that the severity of the symptoms may vary from person to person.

What genetic tests are available for cancer risk?

More than 50 hereditary cancer syndromes have been described. The majority of these are caused by highly penetrant mutations that are inherited in a dominant fashion. The list below includes some of the more common inherited cancer syndromes for which genetic testing is available, the gene(s) that are mutated in each syndrome, and the cancer types most often associated with these syndromes.

Hereditary breast cancer and ovarian cancer syndrome

  • Genes: BRCA1, BRCA2
  • Related cancer types: Female breast, ovarian, and other cancers, including prostate, pancreatic, and male breast cancer

Li-Fraumeni syndrome

  • Gene: TP53
  • Related cancer types: Breast cancer, soft tissue sarcoma, osteosarcoma (bone cancer), leukemia, brain tumors, adrenocortical carcinoma (cancer of the adrenal glands), and other cancers

Cowden syndrome (PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome)

  • Gene: PTEN
  • Related cancer types: Breast, thyroid, endometrial (uterine lining), and other cancers

Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer)

  • Genes: MSH2, MLH1, MSH6, PMS2, EPCAM
  • Related cancer types: Colorectal, endometrial, ovarian, renal pelvis, pancreatic, small intestine, liver and biliary tract, stomach, brain, and breast cancers

Familial adenomatous polyposis

  • Gene: APC
  • Related cancer types: Colorectal cancer, multiple non-malignant colon polyps, and both non-cancerous (benign) and cancerous tumors in the small intestine, brain, stomach, bone, skin, and other tissues

Retinoblastoma

  • Gene: RB1
  • Related cancer types: Eye cancer (cancer of the retina), pinealoma (cancer of the pineal gland), osteosarcoma, melanoma, and soft tissue sarcoma

Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (Wermer syndrome)

  • Gene: MEN1
  • Related cancer types: Pancreatic endocrine tumors and (usually benign) parathyroid and pituitary gland tumors

Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2

Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome

  • Gene: VHL
  • Related cancer types: Kidney cancer and multiple noncancerous tumors, including pheochromocytoma

Who should consider genetic testing for cancer risk?

Many experts recommend that genetic testing for cancer risk should be strongly considered when all three of the following criteria are met:

  • The person being tested has a personal or family history that suggests an inherited cancer risk condition
  • The test results can be adequately interpreted (that is, they can clearly tell whether a specific genetic change is present or absent)
  • The results provide information that will help guide a person’s future medical care

The features of a person’s personal or family medical history that, particularly in combination, may suggest a hereditary cancer syndrome include:

  • Cancer that was diagnosed at an unusually young age
  • Several different types of cancer that have occurred independently in the same person
  • Cancer that has developed in both organs in a set of paired organs, such as both kidneys or both breasts
  • Several close blood relatives that have the same type of cancer (for example, a mother, daughter, and sisters with breast cancer)
  • Unusual cases of a specific cancer type (for example, breast cancer in a man)
  • The presence of birth defects, such as certain noncancerous (benign) skin growths or skeletal abnormalities, that are known to be associated with inherited cancer syndromes
  • Being a member of a racial/ethnic group that is known to have an increased chance of having a certain hereditary cancer syndrome and having one or more of the above features as well

It is strongly recommended that a person who is considering genetic testing speak with a professional trained in genetics before deciding whether to be tested. These professionals can include doctors, genetic counselors, and other health care providers (such as nurses, psychologists, or social workers). Genetic counseling can help people consider the risks, benefits, and limitations of genetic testing in their particular situation. Sometimes the genetic professional finds that testing is not needed.

Genetic counseling includes a detailed review of the individual’s personal and family medical history related to possible cancer risk. Counseling also includes discussions about such issues as:

  • Whether genetic testing is appropriate, which specific test(s) might be used, and the technical accuracy of the test(s)
  • The medical implications of a positive or a negative test result (see below)
  • The possibility that a test result might not be informative—that is, that the information may not be useful in making health care decisions (see below)
  • The psychological risks and benefits of learning one’s genetic test results
  • The risk of passing a genetic mutation (if one is present in a parent) to children

Learning about these issues is a key part of the informed consent process. Written informed consent is strongly recommended before a genetic test is ordered. People give their consent by signing a form saying that they have been told about, and understand, the purpose of the test, its medical implications, the risks and benefits of the test, possible alternatives to the test, and their privacy rights.

Unlike most other medical tests, genetic tests can reveal information not only about the person being tested but also about that person’s relatives. The presence of a harmful genetic mutation in one family member makes it more likely that other blood relatives may also carry the same mutation. Family relationships can be affected when one member of a family discloses genetic test results that may have implications for other family members. Family members may have very different opinions about how useful it is to learn whether they do or do not have a disease-related genetic mutation. Health discussions may get complicated when some family members know their genetic status while other family members do not choose to know their test results. A conversation with genetics professionals may help family members better understand the complicated choices they may face.

How is genetic testing done?

Genetic tests are usually requested by a person’s doctor or other health care provider. Although it may be possible to obtain some genetic tests without a health care provider’s order, this approach is not recommended because it does not give the patient the valuable opportunity to discuss this complicated decision with a knowledgeable professional.

Testing is done on a small sample of body fluid or tissue—usually blood, but sometimes saliva, cells from inside the cheek, skin cells, or amniotic fluid (the fluid surrounding a developing fetus).

The sample is then sent to a laboratory that specializes in genetic testing. The laboratory returns the test results to the doctor or genetic counselor who requested the test. In some cases, the laboratory may send the results to the patient directly. It usually takes several weeks or longer to get the test results. Genetic counseling is recommended both before and after genetic testing to make sure that patients have accurate information about what a particular genetic test means for their health and care.

What do the results of genetic testing mean?

Genetic testing can have several possible results: positive, negative, true negative, uninformative negative, false negative, variant of unknown significance, or benignpolymorphism. These results are described below.

A “positive test result” means that the laboratory found a specific genetic alteration (or mutation) that is associated with a hereditary cancer syndrome. A positive result may:

  • Confirm the diagnosis of a hereditary cancer syndrome
  • Indicate an increased risk of developing certain cancer(s) in the future
  • Show that someone carries a particular genetic change that does not increase their own risk of cancer but that may increase the risk in their children if they also inherit an altered copy from their other parent (that is, if the child inherits two copies of the abnormal gene, one from their mother and one from their father).
  • Suggest a need for further testing
  • Provide important information that can help other family members make decisions about their own health care.

Also, people who have a positive test result that indicates that they have an increased risk of developing cancer in the future may be able to take steps to lower their risk of developing cancer or to find cancer earlier, including:

  • Being checked at a younger age or more often for signs of cancer
  • Reducing their cancer risk by taking medications or having surgery to remove “at-risk” tissue (These approaches to risk reduction are options for only a few inherited cancer syndromes.)
  • Changing personal behaviors (like quitting smoking, getting more exercise, and eating a healthier diet) to reduce the risk of certain cancers

A positive result on a prenatal genetic test for cancer risk may influence a decision about whether to continue a pregnancy. The results of pre-implantation testing (performed on embryos created by in vitro fertilization) can guide a doctor in deciding which embryo (or embryos) to implant in a woman’s uterus.

Finally, in patients who have already been diagnosed with cancer, a positive result for a mutation associated with certain hereditary cancer syndromes can influence how the cancer is treated. For example, some hereditary cancer disorders interfere with the body’s ability to repair damage that occurs to cellular DNA. If someone with one of these conditions receives a standard dose of radiation or chemotherapy to treat their cancer, they may experience severe, potentially life-threatening treatment side effects. Knowing about the genetic disorder before treatment begins allows doctors to modify the treatment and reduce the severity of the side effects.

A “negative test result” means that the laboratory did not find the specific alteration that the test was designed to detect. This result is most useful when working with a family in which the specific, disease-causing genetic alteration is already known to be present. In such a case, a negative result can show that the tested family member has not inherited the mutation that is present in their family and that this person therefore does not have the inherited cancer syndrome tested for, does not have an increased genetic risk of developing cancer, or is not a carrier of a mutation that increases cancer risk. Such a test result is called a “true negative.” A true negative result does not mean that there is no cancer risk, but rather that the risk is probably the same as the cancer risk in the general population.

When a person has a strong family history of cancer but the family has not been found to have a known mutation associated with a hereditary cancer syndrome, a negative test result is classified as an “uninformative negative” (that is, does not provide useful information). It is not possible to tell whether someone has a harmful gene mutation that was not detected by the particular test used (a “false negative”) or whether the person truly has no cancer-predisposing genetic alterations in that gene. It is also possible for a person to have a mutation in a gene other than the gene that was tested.

If genetic testing shows a change that has not been previously associated with cancer in other people, the person’s test result may report “variant of unknown significance,” or VUS. This result may be interpreted as “ambiguous” (uncertain), which is to say that the information does not help in making health care decisions.

If the test reveals a genetic change that is common in the general population among people without cancer, the change is called a polymorphism. Everyone has commonly occurring genetic variations (polymorphisms) that are not associated with any increased risk of disease.

Who can help people understand their test results?

A genetic counselor, doctor, or other health care professional trained in genetics can help an individual or family understand their test results. Such counseling may include discussing recommendations for preventive care and screening with the patient, referring the patient to support groups and other information resources, and providing emotional support to the person receiving the results.


Email motherhealth@gmail.com for a DNA test for early cancer detection.

DMSO, hydrogen peroxide and Vit C fight cancer cells

Increase your cell nutrients (positive outcome from your gene expression with selected nutrients also in PDR – Physician Desk  Reference and see Youtube Dr Oz Pharmanex scanner which validates the supplements from this store) , email motherhealth@gmail.com to own this store for you:
www.clubalthea.pxproducts.com

DMSO

You might ask your oncologist why your chances of survival are only 3% (ignoring all of their statistical gibberish such as “5-year survival rates” and deceptive terms like “remission” and “response”), when your chance of survival would be over 90% if they used DMSO.

It would be better for medical doctors to treat cancer patients with the right treatment than to have patients treat themselves at home. Medical doctors can diagnose better, treat better, watch for developing problems better, etc. Unfortunately, doctors are using treatments that have been chosen solely on the basis of their profitability rather than their effectiveness.

DMSO is a highly non-toxic, 100% natural product that comes from the wood industry. But of course, like so many other potential cancer cures, the discovery was buried. DMSO, being a natural product, cannot be patented and cannot be made profitable because it is produced by the ton in the wood industry. The only side-effect of using DMSO in humans is body odor (which varies from patient to patient).

Your complete DNA sequence will help shape the future of medicine

The FDA took note of the effectiveness of DMSO at treating pain and made it illegal for medical uses in order to protect the profits of the aspirin companies (in those days aspirin was used to treat arthritis). Thus, it must be sold today as a “solvent.” Few people can grasp the concept that government agencies are organized for the sole purpose of being the “police force” of large, corrupt corporations.

While it is generally believed that orthodox medicine and modern corrupt politicians persecute alternative medicine, this is not technically correct. What they do is persecute ANY cure for cancer, it doesn’t matter whether it is orthodox or alternative. The proof of this is DMSO. It appears that orthodox medicine persecutes alternative medicine only because there are far more alternative cancer treatments that can cure cancer than orthodox treatments.

Folic acid

Another substance that targets cancer cells is being researched at Purdue University and other places: folic acid. This too will be buried unless it can lead to more profitable cancer treatments.

But alternative medicine is rightfully not interested in combining DMSO with chemotherapy. DMSO will combine with many substances, grab them, and drag them into cancer cells. It will also blast through the blood-brain barrier like it wasn’t even there.

DMSO has been combined successfully with hydrogen peroxide (e.g. see Donsbach), cesium chloride, MSM (though it may not bind to MSM), and other products.

DMSO – Vitamin C Treatment

Vitamin C is so simlar to glucose, that cells, and especially cancer cells, consume vitamin C the same way they would consume glucose.

Cancer cells are anaerobic obligates, which means they depend upon glucose as their primary source of metabolic fuel. Cancer cells employ transport mechanisms called glucose transporters to actively pull in glucose.

In the vast majority of animals, vitamin C is synthesized from glucose in only four metabolic steps. Hence, the molecular shape of vitamin C is remarkably similar to glucose. Cancer cells will actively transport vitamin C into themselves, possibly because they mistake it for glucose. Another plausible explanation is that they are using the vitamin C as an antioxidant. Regardless, the vitamin C accumulates in cancer cells.

If large amounts of vitamin C are presented to cancer cells, large amounts will be absorbed. In these unusually large concentrations, the antioxidant vitamin C will start behaving as a pro-oxidant as it interacts with intracellular copper and iron. This chemical interaction produces small amounts of hydrogen peroxide.

Because cancer cells are relatively low in an intracellular anti-oxidant enzyme called catalase, the high dose vitamin C induction of peroxide will continue to build up until it eventually lyses the cancer cell from the inside out! This effectively makes high dose IVC a non-toxic chemotherapeutic agent that can be given in conjunction with conventional cancer treatments. Based on the work of several vitamin C pioneers before him, Dr. Riordan was able to prove that vitamin C was selectively toxic to cancer cells if given intravenously. This research was recently reproduced and published by Dr. Mark Levine at the National Institutes of Health.

As feared by many oncologists, small doses may actually help the cancer cells because small amounts of vitamin C may help the cancer cells arm themselves against the free-radical induced damage caused by chemotherapy and radiation. Only markedly higher doses of vitamin C will selectively build up as peroxide in the cancer cells to the point of acting in a manner similar to chemotherapy. These tumor-toxic dosages can only be obtained by intravenous administration.

Over a span of 15 years of vitamin C research, Dr. Riordan’s RECNAC (cancer spelled backwards) research team generated 20 published papers on vitamin C and cancer. RECNAC even inspired its second cancer research institute, known as RECNAC II, at the University of Puerto Rico. This group recently published an excellent paper in Integrative Cancer Therapies, titled “Orthomolecular Oncology Review: Ascorbic Acid and Cancer 25 Years Later.” RECNAC data has shown that vitamin C is toxic to tumor cells without sacrificing the performance of chemotherapy.

Intravenous vitamin C also does more than just kill cancer cells. It boosts immunity. It can stimulate collagen formation to help the body wall off the tumor. It inhibits hyaluronidase, an enzyme that tumors use to metastasize and invade other organs throughout the body. It induces apoptosis to help program cancer cells into dying early. It corrects the almost universal scurvy in cancer patients. Cancer patients are tired, listless, bruise easily, and have a poor appetite. They don’t sleep well and have a low threshold for pain. This adds up to a very classic picture of scurvy that generally goes unrecognized by their conventional physicians.

Because cancer cells consume 15 times more glucose than normal cells, under the right conditions, cancer cells should consume 15 times more vitamin C than a normal cell. While normal cells benefit from vitamin C, the microbes inside of the cancer cells may be killed by vitamin C. It is microbes which are inside of the cancer cells which cause cancer and which force a cancer cell to remain cancerous.
It should be mentioned that two-time Nobel Prize winner Linus Pauling, and an associate, Dr. Ewan Cameron, M.D., were able to extend the lives of cancer patients more than 10-fold using only 10 grams of vitamin C a day by I.V.
This protocol will modify the Pauling/Cameron protocol four different ways:
1) It will include DMSO in the evening dose to help Vitamin C target cancer cells and get inside of cancer cells,
2) It includes a very, very low glucose diet so that the cancer cells will feast on Vitamin C instead of glucose,
3) It includes 15% or less potassium ascorbate, which has a special affinity for cancer cells,
4) It will include as little sodium ascorbate (or other sodium forms of Vitamin C) as possible because these types of Vitamin C do not get inside of cancer cells very well.
Regarding the use of potassium ascorbate, a foundation in Italy has proven that potassium ascorbate can be used to cure cancer (WARNING: no more than 15% of the Vitmain C you take should be a potassium version!!). See: Pantellini Foundation (Italy)

WARNING

Do NOT use potassium ascorbate or any other form of potassium as your primary source of Vitamin C!!! If you use potassium ascorbate work with the vendor of this product to insure you are taking safe doses relative to non-potassium forms of Vitamin C!!! If your vendor does not make a recommendation, then use 15% as the maximum portion of Vitamin C that is a potassium form!!
The second thing this treatment uses is DMSO. DMSO is used to “open” the ports on the cancer cells to assist getting vitamin C inside the cancer cells. DMSO is very well known to target cancer cells and open their ports. To better understand this concept see this article.

In summary, there are three things that help get the vitamin C inside the cancer cells:
1) Cancer cells consume 15 times more glucose than normal cells and cancer cells cannot tell the difference between glucose and vitamin C.
2) The use of potassium ascorbate as a part of the Vitamin C protocol.
3) The use of DMSO.
A fourth unique thing about this protocol is the “cancer diet.” The cancer diet for this treatment focuses on a LOW GLUCOSE cancer diet. In this way, the cancer cells have less glucose to interfere with their consumption of vitamin C!

Possible Swelling and Inflammation

There are two possible results when large amounts of vitamin C get inside of a cancer cell. First, the vitamin C can kill the microbe(s) inside the cancer cell and the cell will safely revert into a normal cell; or second, the vitamin C can kill the cancer cell itself.

While the first of these two options will not cause any swelling or inflammation, the second option may cause swelling and inflammation.
For this reason, anyone on this protocol who would be put at risk by swelling and/or inflammation (e.g. in a tumor), should carefully and slowly build-up to the theraputic dose of vitamin C, watching carefully for any potential swelling or inflammation.

Details of the Treatment

Many people have difficulties working with DMSO. In some cases, when taken transdermally (through the skin) there is a skin rash which is simply too severe to continue the treatment. When you get your bottle of DMSO put one drop on your skin, spread it around a little bit and see if you have an allergic reaction (i.e. severe rash). If not, an hour later put 10 drops on your skin and spread it thin.

If you do have a reaction, you may still be able to take the DMSO orally (added to 4 ounces of water). But if you cannot take the DMSO orally, and you have a skin reaction to the DMSO, you will have to abandon this treatment.

If you want to know more about DMSO, see this website:
http://www.dmso.org/articles/information/muir.htm

The Importance of the DMSO

This treatment uses DMSO (in the evening) and vitamin C (twice a day). The theory of this treatment is that the DMSO will be used first (in the evening dose), either taken orally (with water) or transdermally (through the skin). In about 10 minutes the DMSO will have targeted the cancer cells and will start “opening up” their ports.

In the evening dose, about ten minutes after taking the DMSO, the vitamin C will be taken with water. When the vitamin C gets to the cancer cells the cells natural affinity for consuming vitamin C (because the cancer cells “think” the vitamin C is glucose) should be enhanced by the fact that the cancer cells have been “opened up” by DMSO.

The theory is that the DMSO will allow a larger concentration of vitamin C to get inside the cancer cells than would normally occur.

As already mentioned, once vitamin C can get inside of a cancer cell the cell may revert into a normal cell or it may be killed. If enough cancer cells are killed, some swelling may occur.


card motherhealth

For preventing diabetes, losing weight, clearing up inflammation and turning back the clock, join me at Health Care Network Alliance to measure your anti-oxidant level and supplements which impact your gene expression at :

AgeLoc Youth & lifepak Combo pack
Email Connie or join as consumer/distributor at:

Use my ID when completing the form:

  • Distributorship ID #: USW9578356

Positive impact of Google, internet, Youtube, Airbnb, UBER, Facebook, computers, smart phones, dietary supplements

An architect who lives in San Francisco was able to save $6000 per year using UBER.

Thousands of cities get more visitors who can live affordably using AIRBNB.

Many people learn new skills using the Internet, Youtube and Google.

Families are united after many years of absence because of finding each other in Facebook.

More healthy people are saved, cost of medications are cut and overall future health care costs are reduced with healthy lifestyle and use of dietary supplements and whole foods.

More tasks, jobs, learning, communication and networking occur using smart phones, and computers which created more jobs, more students and college grads with more skills and more happiness.

Can we find more ways to erase poverty and bring prosperity?

Yes, help me fund and develop a mobile app to match seniors and home helpers/caregivers. Contact Connie Dello Buono at motherhealth@gmail.com 408-854-1883 or donate your time/real estate to Motherhealth Inc, 501c3 at 1708 hallmark lane San Jose, CA 95124