Positive impact of Google, internet, Youtube, Airbnb, UBER, Facebook, computers, smart phones, dietary supplements

An architect who lives in San Francisco was able to save $6000 per year using UBER.

Thousands of cities get more visitors who can live affordably using AIRBNB.

Many people learn new skills using the Internet, Youtube and Google.

Families are united after many years of absence because of finding each other in Facebook.

More healthy people are saved, cost of medications are cut and overall future health care costs are reduced with healthy lifestyle and use of dietary supplements and whole foods.

More tasks, jobs, learning, communication and networking occur using smart phones, and computers which created more jobs, more students and college grads with more skills and more happiness.

Can we find more ways to erase poverty and bring prosperity?

Yes, help me fund and develop a mobile app to match seniors and home helpers/caregivers. Contact Connie Dello Buono at motherhealth@gmail.com 408-854-1883 or donate your time/real estate to Motherhealth Inc, 501c3 at 1708 hallmark lane San Jose, CA 95124

Hot topics in City of Palo Alto, California

  • scholarship program, for low income families to be able to take classes.2)no smoking policy in public areas
  • Affordable housing for low to middle income families
  • Job-share options for parents and apprenticeships for teens
  • Free shuttle between East Palo Alto and Palo Alto so youth can partake in afterschool activities.
  • Transportation: less traffic, more parking, more shuttles.
  • Authorize mother-in-law units before approving anymore housing projects.
  • Build a modern, secure law enforcement facility.
  • Improve accessibility by bicycle and public transit to reduce auto traffic in the city
  • Continue to maintain the city’s wonderful investment in tree-lined streets
  • Keep Palo Alto economically vibrant
  • Plan for University Avenue to become a pedestrian mall, closed to traffic
  • Traffic remediation for the abomination which is Town & Country Shopping Center
  • City-supplied free Wifi in major commercial zones
  • Serving current residents and preserving quality of life first
  • Updating, maintaining infrastructure
  • Sound financial future

And more…

http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/gov/topics/open_city_hall.asp?pd_url=http%3A%2F%2Fpeakdemocracy.com%2Fportals%2F5%2Fv%2F1dc9c29ba88deedaca74da37a458daa6ae8f45b5#peak_democracy

open city hall pa housing a priority as requested by the community in Palo Alto need to be more green in palo alto

2014 Social Security Benefit of $2642 max per month

Save 10% of your money towards your retirement savings plan since Social Security can only give you a max of $2642 per month.

Full deduction of $5.5k yearly contribution to your Roth IRA from your gross yearly income of $60k for single and yearly income of $95k for married. 

Traditional IRA: Required Min Distribution upon reaching 70.5 yrs and upon reaching 59.5 yrs , distribution is subject to income taxes except for the portion contributed to nondeductible contributions.  No penalties with IRA holder if you become disabled, purchased your first home ($10k limit), buy medical insurance, qualified educational expenses and at death.

Roth IRA is tax free withdrawal for first in and income last. Roth IRA must be owned for five years

Learn about social security benefits, qualified and non qualified index Annuities (no fees/no admin fees, guaranteed lifetime income) and tax advantaged retirement savings plan every Sat in Fremont and Mon-Friday in San Jose. Contact Connie Dello Buono CA Life Lic 0G60621 408-854-1883 motherhealth@gmail.com

More than 10 reasons why we need life insurance

Your greatest asset to protect is your life. As a mother and a life insurance agent, I want to show you why we need life insurance, not just for creating an immediate estate to my children in the absence of an inheritance as I am not rich at the moment. Connie Dello Buono CA Life Lic 0G60621 motherhealth@gmail.com 408-8541883 (in 50 US states) Here are the top reasons why we all need a life insurance:

1. create an asset or estate, up to $2M

2. allow my family to grieve peacefully, without worries and can remember me during the time that the life insurance proceeds can help them with college, buying a house or sending their children to college

3. allow my family to find money should I need a similar to long term care needs after a stroke, disability or an early/last stage terminal illness

4. provide for a lifetime retirement income for me as I do not have other retirement plans in place

5. More than ten reasons for business owners, like a buy and sell agreement would allow the other partner not to deal with the spouse should the business partner dies, and here are  the other reasons:

mortgage protection how much disability income do I need index strategy and rates indexing strategy dividends return of premium IRS rules and modified endowment contracts riders LSW 1035 exchange p2 1035 exchange p1 survivorship no probate estate created mortgage protection money purchase key person executive bonus final expenses life insurance with added LTC similar to long term care policy buy sell agreement life insurance you do not have to die to use

 

Note: Chronic illness rider is currently being reevaluated in California. Some IUL caps or returns up to 10%,12%,13%,15% or more with guarantees of 2%,2.5%,3%
Your referral to anyone who needs a retirement review, estate plan review, life insurance review, college plan review and life review is much appreciated.

Connie Dello Buono , CA Life Lic 0G60621
motherhealth@gmail.com

Wealth gap lasting into retirement by Michael Hill

William Kistler views retirement like someone tied to the tracks and watching a train coming. It’s looming and threatening, but there’s little he can do.

Kistler, a 63-year-old resident of Golden, Colorado, has been unable to build up a nest egg for himself and his wife with his modest salary at a nonprofit. He has saved little in a 401(k) over the past decade, after spending most of his working life self-employed. That puts him far behind many wealthier Americans approaching retirement.

“There is not enough to retire with,” he said. “It’s completely frightening, to tell you the truth. And I, like a lot of people, try not to think about it too much, which is actually a problem.”

With traditional pensions becoming rarer in the private sector, and lower-paid workers less likely to have access to an employer-provided retirement plan, there is a growing gulf in the retirement savings of the wealthy and people with lower incomes. That, experts say, could exacerbate an already widening wealth gap across America, as more than 70 million baby boomers head into retirement – many of them with skimpy reserves.

Because retirement savings are ever more closely tied to income, the widening gulf between the rich and those with less promises to continue – and perhaps worsen – after workers reach retirement age. That is likely to put pressure on government services and lead even more Americans to work well into what is supposed to be their golden years.

Increasingly, financial security for retirees reflects how much they have accumulated during their working career – things like 401(k) accounts, other savings and home equity.

Highly educated, dual income couples tend to do better under this system. The future looks bleaker for people with less education, lower incomes or health issues, as well as for single parents, said Karen Smith, a senior fellow at the Urban Institute, a Washington think tank.

“We do find rising inequality,” said Smith, who added that it’s a problem if those at the top are seeing disproportionate gains from economic growth.

Incomes for the highest-earning 1 percent of Americans soared 31 percent from 2009 through 2012, after adjusting for inflation, according to data compiled by Emmanuel Saez, an economist at University of California, Berkeley. For everyone else, it inched up an average of 0.4 percent.

Researchers at the liberal Economic Policy Institute say households in the top fifth of income saw median retirement savings increase from $45,539 in 1989 to $160,000 in 2010 in inflation-adjusted dollars. For households in the bottom fifth, median retirement savings were down from $8,433 in 1989 to $8,000 in 2010, adjusted for inflation. The calculations did not include households without retirement savings.

Employment Benefit Research Institute research director Jack VanDerhei found that in households where annual income is less than $25,000, nine in 10 saved less than $10,000, up slightly from 2009. For households with six-figure incomes, 42 percent saved at least $250,000, up from 34 percent five years earlier.

The days of retirees being able to count on set monthly payments from pensions continue to fade among non-government workers. Only 13 percent of private-sector workers now participate in “defined benefit” plans, compared with a third of such workers in 1985. They’ve been eclipsed by “defined contribution” plans, often 401(k)s, in which employers match a portion of employee contributions.

Americans know they need to save for retirement. The trick for many is actually doing it. It’s estimated that about half of private-sector workers don’t take part in a retirement plan at their current job.

“Over the years, all I’ve been able to do, especially as a single parent, is just pay your bills every month,” said Susan McNamara, a 62-year-old adjunct professor from the Boston area. “Anything that’s left over is used up when your car breaks down or when the furnace breaks down. … There’s never anything left over, ever.”

McNamara is divorced and her son is now grown. But she has had heart issues linked to cancer in 2004 and related financial worries. She sold her home to meet expenses. McNamara has a defined contribution plan from past stints as a full-time professor, but its balance is under $50,000.

Or consider Kistler, who makes $41,000 a year working as a benefits counselor for a nonprofit health care provider. He has no substantial savings beyond the 401(k) worth roughly $19,000, and he has debt. He plans to keep working.

Kistler is philosophical about being on the short end of a retirement gap, though he wonders what will happen when boomers in his financial situation begin retiring by the millions.

“This next 10 to 15 years is going to be quite interesting,” he said.

EBRI, a Washington-based nonpartisan research group, projects that more than 55 percent of baby boomers and the generation that follows them, Generation X, will have enough money to last through retirement.

But EBRI also found the least wealthy boomer and Gen X households are far more likely to run short of money in retirement. Under some models, 43 percent of those in the lowest quarter run short of money in the first year of retirement.

VanDerhei, EBRI’s research director, said members of that group are relying mostly on Social Security and lacked consistent access to retirement plans over their careers.

Many of those retirees will find that it won’t be enough, David John of AARP’s Public Policy Institute said, noting the average monthly Social Security retiree benefit last year was about $1,300.

“In the long run, if we have significant numbers of people retiring on Social Security and very little else, there’s going to be a tremendous pressure on state and local governments for additional services, ranging from health to housing to libraries,” John said. “There’s going to be significant pressure on the national government to provide additional support.”

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It is not late, email connie dello buono , retirement planner at motherhealth@gmail.com at 408-854-1883 for your various options for a sound pension – lifetime retirement income that is tax advantaged. CA Life Lic 0G60621

In 50 US states, we help self employed, retired and all workers to save tax free at 8-13% return and also hiring financial service professionals part time to work from their community with full training and support. Life and Health insurance license rquired.