Asset Protection Iron Triangle by Charles Lamm

Asset protection is not just for the wealthy any longer. When a middle class home can easily run a half million dollars in Florida or another state, and over a million in California or other state, anyone can become a target of lawsuits, divorce courts, and the IRS.  You have to dig a well before you are thirsty, or in this case, build a legal fortress before invading barbarians reach your gate.

Your tools to protect your assets are:

  • “no asset” C corporation
  • Limited liability company (LLC)
  • Beneficiary controlled trust

C Corporation

  • A “no asset” C corporation will be the management company for your LLC. The two work together to protect your property from those who would take it from you.
  • You are employed by the C Corp, not the LLC. You can also be the sole shareholder and hold all of the officer positions. Your corporation owns nothing but a checkbook.

Your corporation can pay for:

  • medical insurance for the officers
  • life insurance ($50 thousand limit)
  • retirement plan

As an officer, you can be reimbursed for out-of-pocket medical expenses through a medical expense reinbursement plan (MERP).

Entertainment expenses directly related to the business can include:

  • training expenses
  • travel
  • meals
  • computer expenses
  • phone expenses
  • business gifts up to $25 per recipient
  • Never let your corporation pay for personal items. Commingling of funds could pierce the corporate veil and make you personally liable for corporate debts in the event of a judgment against the corporation.
  • Consult your CPA or tax advisor for the latest changes in allowable deductions.

LLC

  • Your limited liability company is where you earn your income. Your LLC should also own any vehicles, equipment, computers, copiers, printers, and real property.
  • You want your Operating Agreement to make your corporation the Manager of your LLC.
  • Your LLC should also pay the bulk of your operating expenses for your office, supplies, travel, fuel, utilities, phone, computers, and more.
  • Your interest in the LLC will be as a 99% member will be owned by the trust.

Beneficiary Controlled Trust

  • A beneficiary controlled trust is the crown jewel of asset protection.
  • While I will not go into detail here, a BCT works like this:
  • Someone other than yourself establishes an irrevocable trust with you as the beneficiary and as the Investment Trustee. A second entity or person is required as the Distribution Trustee.

Seek Advise

Charles Lamm’s company, _________Services, Inc., can act as your Distribution Trustee if you want to keep your affairs private from your friends and relatives.  __________ to take advantage of Florida’s excellent trust laws, as well as no state income tax.

  • The Grantor can put up to $12,000 per year into the trust without gift tax considerations, and you have an immediate right to withdraw the money as it is a Crummey defective grantor trust.
  • It’s complicated, but the idea is to leave the assets in the trust and use the trust to own the LLC and to take care of your needs.
  • The trust can purchase property, pay for your education and medical expenses, and take care of your physical well-being. You have full control over the trust assets without actually owning anything.
  • As the Investment Trustee, you control how the assets are used, and you can replace the Distribution Trustee at any time.

Summary:

  •  You are now isolated from lawsuits, creditors, judgments, ex-spouses, and the IRS.
  • Location within Broward and the state of Florida
  • Location within Broward and the state of Florida (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
  • Charles Lamm is a retired attorney who owns Trustee and RA Services, Inc., in Coral Springs, Florida. His asset protection blog can be found at http://trusteeandraservices.ml

Business ownership, real estate and paper assets are your path to wealth building

Business ownership and real estate are the two wealth building asset
classes financial advisers typically don’t talk about (because they
can’t sell them) even though they are essential components to many
wealth plans.

Just to be fair, however, business ownership and real estate aren’t
for everyone either. These two asset classes have their own set of
issues (there is no perfect solution) and require far more active
involvement to create excess returns.

You must have entrepreneurial skills and a deep commitment to your
vision to compete. Additionally, the risks are much higher and the
outcome is less certain. Finally, both of these asset classes
require a higher dedication of your scarcest resource – time.

With that said, if you have what it takes you can gain huge
leverage and tax advantages. There is literally no practical limit
to the mathematical return you can make on investment.

Some entrepreneurs and innovative real estate investors have gone
from zero to financial security in under 5 years starting with
little or nothing – something you can’t do with paper assets.

With real estate and business ownership you are limited only by
your dedication, abilities, and creativity. It is a higher reward,
higher risk path that can be good if you have entrepreneurial
dreams and skills.

One of my favorite ways to manage the risk (something you will
learn more about in future lessons on risk management) is to work
the two paths simultaneously and hedge your bets.

For example, one of my coaching clients has a passion for real
estate and his spouse has a high earning career she loves. He is
building the real estate portfolio for wealth while she supports
current lifestyle with her earned income. They keep their their
expenses below her earnings and max out retirement plans with paper
assets each year.

With this plan they are working two simultaneous paths to wealth –
one through traditional savings and paper assets, and the other
through real estate. Because of other risk management tools we’ve
implemented their risk of failure is so small their ultimate goal
is a question of “when”… not “if”.

Another client is building his wealth through growing two separate
businesses. He also purchased the real estate that his
companies rent and contributes massive amounts annually to
his wife’s and his retirement savings. Each component – his
business, real estate, and paper assets – are individually
sufficient to provide financial security. It is really just a
matter of which one will get there first – not whether he will
reach the goal at all.

Notice how these paths are not mutually exclusive but can be
creatively combined to increase synergy and reduce risk.

You homework is to build these concepts into your wealth plan. Do
you fit one of the two profiles where you can use paper assets
exclusively? If not, how are you going to implement business
ownership with real estate while applying risk management?

Map out your wealth plan. Commit it to writing.

————-

Connie’s comments: I work with a senior financial advisor when I map out financial strategies with my clients which include real estate, business ownership and business structuring, tax planning and paper assets. Yesterday, I shared my real estate experience with a young client who wants to own a business and do real estate investing at a young age of 27. Call 408-854-1883 or email me at motherhealth@gmail.com to map out your wealth plan.

C corporation for the practice, structure for max savings and min taxes

C corporation can be the right choice for many small entities because of the deductions it allows.

A C corporation enjoys a full deduction for the cost of employees (including owner employees) health insurance, group term life insurance up to $50k per employee and even long-term care premiums without regard to age-based limitations.

A C corporation can also deduct the costs of a medical reimbursement plan.

Lower Tax Rates for C Corporations

potential income taxes loss

C corporations enjoy their own graduated rates.

Best of both worlds

Many medical practices can take advantage of both the C corp and S corp by setting up two distinct entities to operate different aspects of their practice. The S corp can be used for the operating side of the practice while the C corp can be used for the management functions. In this way, the medical practice as a whole can take advantage of both the tax deductions afforded a C corp and the flow-through advantages of an S corp.

protect your practice

income tax analysis

professional corp

section 79

————–

Contact Connie Dello Buono 408-854-1883, financial planner working with your CPA, motherhealth@gmail.com for a finance and business structure and strategy to save your business significant income taxes

———————————

Free 30min phone chat with a sr financial advisor at Harding Financial to help you reduce income taxes using a business structure and financial strategies, connie.dellobuono@hardingfinancial.com or conniedbuono@gmail.com 408-854-1883

Make 2014 and 2015 be the year to protect your wealth and secure your retirement.

 Connie Dello Buono
Jr Financial Advisor
hardingfinancial.com

Asset Protection Introduction For Small Business Owners

This article is intended for every small business owner/entrepreneur who left behind Corporate America for the opportunity and dream of starting their own business.

This entrepreneurial spirit is what made this country what it is today.  However, this dream could be shattered very quickly without taking into consideration adequate asset protection plan.  The notes below were prepared by a lawyer in Florida.


Before we can continue, we need to define what asset protection is.  In very simple terms asset protection is the protection of assets from creditors.  In fact asset protection is part of a bigger concept of risk management.  Risk management is planning that seeks to protect business owners from potential future losses (i.e., avoid liability).  Unfortunately today most small business owners are not structuring or operating their businesses to avoid liability.  Thus, the primary goal of asset protection is to allow business owners to protect themselves from creditors’ claims while retaining a substantial, if not all, portion of their assets.

This article will briefly discuss four different areas of asset protection: (1) – protection from personal and business creditors; (2) – the most common corporate entities for protection: (3) – the operational and holding entities concept; and (4) –  exempt personal assets in Florida.

Please remember that in no way should asset protection planning ever aid in protecting criminal activity.  Asset protection involves implementing a plan to legally protect wealth.  Please also note the use of asset protection planning is subject to the Uniform Fraudulent Transfer Act that was incorporated in Chapter 726 of the Florida Statutes and other states rules that are applicable.  It is important that you seek the assistance of an attorney before seeking any kind of asset protection plan.

Separating your personal creditors from your business creditors.  It is very important that you separate your personal creditors from your business creditors.  Personal creditors are creditors for which you are “personally” responsible for, whether from a debt or a judgment.  This means you will need to satisfy any debt or judgment with your personal assets rather than business assets.  On the other hand, business creditors are creditors for which your “business entity” is responsible for, whether from a debt or a judgment.  Thus, assets placed within the business entity are vulnerable to the business creditors, but protected, for the most part, from the owner’s personal creditors.  Likewise, assets kept outside of the business entity are vulnerable to the owner’s personal creditors, but protected from the business’ creditors.

The majority of small business owners mistakenly believe that assets within a business entity are not subject to any type of liability.  However, remember that your business entity, if a corporation or a Limited Liability Company is a separate “legal person” from you and is subject to liability from vendors, clients, employees and others.  Likewise, assets within your corporate entity are only shielded from liability from your personal creditors.  Regardless of this limited protection it is important that you at least separate these two kinds of creditors.  It is important that as a small business owner you conduct business as a separate business entity.  It is equally important that you follow all the business entity formalities and avoid commingling funds.  If you conduct business as a separate business entity, in a correct and formal matter, then you can achieve the first level of asset protection which is the separation of your personal from business creditors.  You could significantly reduce the pool of assets available to creditors when you separate your personal from business creditors.

Choosing the proper business entity.  There are various possible business entities options for your small business.  However, most small business owners should opt to form the business as a Limited Liability Company (“LLC”) or a Corporation (either a “C” or an “S” Corporation).  The reason is very simple, for most small business owners the LLC or Corporation offer far superior liability protection than other business entities such as partnerships or sole proprietorships.  Yet, the LLC and Corporation are different from each other.

Both the LLC and Corporation offer limited liability protection for the owners.  However, usually the LLC, rather than the Corporation, is a better option for the small business owner.  This is because the statute that governs the operation of Corporations is more complex and burdensome than what is imposed to LLC when it comes to “corporate formalities”.  The rules regarding directors, officers, meetings, etc. are stricter for Corporations than for LLCs.  These stricter rules are really detrimental to small business owners that are preoccupied trying to run a successful business and basically performing as a “jack of all trades”.  Please note that the failure to comply with the applicable formalities could allow a court to “pierce the corporate veil”.  Thus, from an asset protection point of view the small business owners will most likely form an LLC rather than a Corporation because of the less stricter “corporate formalities” that LLCs offer.  A court will then be less willing to “pierce the corporate veil” and exposing the small business owners to unlimited liability for personal and business creditors with a Limited Liability Company.  In addition, you will see below how useful an LLC is in more complex asset protection structures.

But please remember that asset protection planning is just one area of your overall risk and business strategy.  There are other areas where a corporate structure is more beneficial than an LLC structure.  Thus, it is important to consult with an attorney first before deciding what type of business entity to create.  An attorney will let you know the pros and cons of each business entity and the consequences of switching from one business entity to another.

Separating Operating and Holding Entities.  We have discussed so far that it is important to separate your personal and business creditors.  You can do that by creating the appropriate business entity and following the appropriate formalities.  In addition, we discussed that for the most part a Limited Liability Company will be the entity of choice for small business owners.  However, you should consult with an attorney before creating an LLC or converting your current business entity to an LLC because of all the other ramifications (i.e., tax, etc) besides asset protection that are important to every small business owner.

Now we will discuss a more complex asset protection structure, including the creation of operating and holding entities.  Again, we discussed so far that assets placed within the businesses entity are vulnerable to the business creditors, but protected, for the most part, from the owner’s personal creditors.  In addition, assets kept outside of the business entity are vulnerable to the owner’s personal creditors, but protected from the business’s creditors.  So, can we further isolate creditors from our business entity?  The answer is yes, with the proper funding and structuring of the business.

You accomplish this by creating an operating entity, which has possession of the assets, but does not own the assets (unless encumbered in favor of the holding entity), and a holding entity, which actually owns the business’ assets.  With this structure, the small business owner can eliminate, or at the very least substantially limit, liability for both the personal and business debts.

In summary, the operating entity conducts all of the business’s activities and, thus, bears all the risk of loss.  The operating entity liability is limited because the operating entity contains a limited amount of assets.  The holding entity holds the majority of the assets but it is not responsible for the operating entity’s debts.  This strategy is more effective when done with LLCs rather with Corporations or other business entities because of the “charging orders” limitations in Florida.

The holding entity is where the majority of the assets of the business are located.  But because the holding company conducts no business activities, it has almost no exposure to liability, and therefore these assets are protected.  Thus, the business most valuable assets should be owned by the holding entity who then leases these assets (i.e., warehouse, equipment, etc) to the operating company, who then provides a way of taking vulnerable cash out of the operating entity in the form of lease payments.  In addition, the holding entity can loan money to the operating entity to buy assets, after which it would secure the loan with liens that run to the holding entity.  This strategy is even more important when assets carry an especially high risk of injury.

When done properly this structure could help in isolating creditors.  However, it very important that the proper formalities and structure are followed to avoid successful court challenges.  Again, you should consult with an attorney to avoid the pitfalls of improper structure.

Exempt Assets.  A good rule of thumb is to never, whenever possible, transfer exempt assets to a business entity.  This is because exempted property is considered unreachable by your creditors.  However, asset exemptions are available only to “natural persons” and not to business entities.  Thus, these assets inside a business entity are fully subject to the claims of business creditors.

Every state has a list of exempt assets.  For example, Florida has over thirty (30) separate exemptions.  The most popular being the homestead exemption.  The Florida Constitution provides that the homestead of a natural person is exempt from a forced sale or seizure by a creditor.  In order to qualify for the homestead exemption, the property, located in Florida, must serve as a residence of the owner or his family.  There are some rules that you should consider in relation to size, liens and bankruptcy law but for the most part this is the general rules for homestead property in Florida.

As a general rule, in states like Florida where the homestead is “unlimited”, ideally, you should pay-off your mortgages and other liens secured by the property.  You should do this because the cash used, non-exempt for asset protection purposes, to make the payments will be converted to exempt property by reducing the mortgages and liens encumbering the homestead.

For example, assume John Doe, a Florida resident, owns a home in Florida worth $400,000 that is subject to a $250,000 mortgage.  John’s homestead protection of $400,000 is ineffective against the $250,000 mortgage.  A mortagee can foreclose your homestead to collect the unpaid mortgage.  Now, let assume John Doe has $250,000 in cash.  Cash is a non-exempt asset and is subject to your creditors.  If John Doe can afford paying off the $250,000 mortgage with the cash he will effectively convert a non-exempt asset (cash) to an exempt asset.  First, John eliminates the $250,000 encumbrance in the homestead.  Second, the cash ($250,000) is now unavailable to his creditors.

Effective Asset Protection.  Asset protection planning is meant for the worst-case scenario.  It is important that as a small business owner you take asset protection seriously.  small business owners lack the unlimited resources of big corporations and even the smallest of the judgment could wreck the dreams and limited resources of the small business owner.

It is important also that your asset protection plan offers flexibility.  Most asset protection plans are meant to last for a long time.  Inevitably changes in the law and your factual situation (i.e., divorce) will occur.  Also, in developing an asset protection strategy there should be an answer for “What if this happens?” and “How my plan protects me against X or Y?”

The final goal of asset protection planning is cost efficiency.  We only discussed the tip of the iceberg is asset protection planning.  There are more complex plans that are beyond the scope of this article (i.e., offshore trust, etc).  A cost effective plan will increase the possibility of a well maintained plan that would translate in a more effective plan.

Finally, you should have your asset protection plan in advance of any legal difficulty.  The poorest candidate for planning is the small business owner in the midst of a crisis.  Even here, however, steps can be taken, albeit cautiously, to protect assets.  It is very important in situation like this one you should seek the advice of an attorney.

This is a four parts article and it is intended for every small business owner/entrepreneur who left behind Corporate America for the opportunity and dream of starting their own business.  This entrepreneurial spirit is what made this country what it is today.  However, this dream could be shattered very quickly without taking into consideration adequate asset protection plan.

Before we can continue, we need to define what asset protection is.  In very simple terms asset protection is the protection of assets from creditors.  In fact asset protection is part of a bigger concept of risk management.  Risk management is planning that seeks to protect business owners from potential future losses (i.e., avoid liability).  Unfortunately today most small business owners are not structuring or operating their businesses to avoid liability.  Thus, the primary goal of asset protection is to allow business owners to protect themselves from creditors’ claims while retaining a substantial, if not all, portion of their assets.

This article will briefly discuss four different areas of asset protection: (1) – protection from personal and business creditors; (2) – the most common corporate entities for protection: (3) – the operational and holding entities concept; and (4) –  exempt personal assets in Florida.

Please remember that in no way should asset protection planning ever aid in protecting criminal activity.  Asset protection involves implementing a plan to legally protect wealth.  Please also note the use of asset protection planning is subject to the Uniform Fraudulent Transfer Act that was incorporated in Chapter 726 of the Florida Statutes.  It is important that you seek the assistance of an attorney before seeking any kind of asset protection plan.

Separating your personal creditors from your business creditors.  It is very important that you separate your personal creditors from your business creditors.  Personal creditors are creditors for which you are “personally” responsible for, whether from a debt or a judgment.  This means you will need to satisfy any debt or judgment with your personal assets rather than business assets.  On the other hand, business creditors are creditors for which your “business entity” is responsible for, whether from a debt or a judgment.  Thus, assets placed within the business entity are vulnerable to the business creditors, but protected, for the most part, from the owner’s personal creditors.  Likewise, assets kept outside of the business entity are vulnerable to the owner’s personal creditors, but protected from the business’ creditors.

The majority of small business owners mistakenly believe that assets within a business entity are not subject to any type of liability.  However, remember that your business entity, if a corporation or a Limited Liability Company is a separate “legal person” from you and is subject to liability from vendors, clients, employees and others.  Likewise, assets within your corporate entity are only shielded from liability from your personal creditors.  Regardless of this limited protection it is important that you at least separate these two kinds of creditors.  It is important that as a small business owner you conduct business as a separate business entity.  It is equally important that you follow all the business entity formalities and avoid commingling funds.  If you conduct business as a separate business entity, in a correct and formal matter, then you can achieve the first level of asset protection which is the separation of your personal from business creditors.  You could significantly reduce the pool of assets available to creditors when you separate your personal from business creditors.

Choosing the proper business entity.  There are various possible business entities options for your small business.  However, most small business owners should opt to form the business as a Limited Liability Company (“LLC”) or a Corporation (either a “C” or an “S” Corporation).  The reason is very simple, for most small business owners the LLC or Corporation offer far superior liability protection than other business entities such as partnerships or sole proprietorships.  Yet, the LLC and Corporation are different from each other.

Both the LLC and Corporation offer limited liability protection for the owners.  However, usually the LLC, rather than the Corporation, is a better option for the small business owner.  This is because the statute that governs the operation of Corporations is more complex and burdensome than what is imposed to LLC when it comes to “corporate formalities”.  The rules regarding directors, officers, meetings, etc. are stricter for Corporations than for LLCs.  These stricter rules are really detrimental to small business owners that are preoccupied trying to run a successful business and basically performing as a “jack of all trades”.  Please note that the failure to comply with the applicable formalities could allow a court to “pierce the corporate veil”.  Thus, from an asset protection point of view the small business owners will most likely form an LLC rather than a Corporation because of the less stricter “corporate formalities” that LLCs offer.  A court will then be less willing to “pierce the corporate veil” and exposing the small business owners to unlimited liability for personal and business creditors with a Limited Liability Company.  In addition, you will see below how useful an LLC is in more complex asset protection structures.

But please remember that asset protection planning is just one area of your overall risk and business strategy.  There are other areas where a corporate structure is more beneficial than an LLC structure.  Thus, it is important to consult with an attorney first before deciding what type of business entity to create.  An attorney will let you know the pros and cons of each business entity and the consequences of switching from one business entity to another.  

Separating Operating and Holding Entities.  We have discussed so far that it is important to separate your personal and business creditors.  You can do that by creating the appropriate business entity and following the appropriate formalities.  In addition, we discussed that for the most part a Limited Liability Company will be the entity of choice for small business owners.  However, you should consult with an attorney before creating an LLC or converting your current business entity to an LLC because of all the other ramifications (i.e., tax, etc) besides asset protection that are important to every small business owner.

Now we will discuss a more complex asset protection structure, including the creation of operating and holding entities.  Again, we discussed so far that assets placed within the businesses entity are vulnerable to the business creditors, but protected, for the most part, from the owner’s personal creditors.  In addition, assets kept outside of the business entity are vulnerable to the owner’s personal creditors, but protected from the business’s creditors.  So, can we further isolate creditors from our business entity?  The answer is yes, with the proper funding and structuring of the business.

You accomplish this by creating an operating entity, which has possession of the assets, but does not own the assets (unless encumbered in favor of the holding entity), and a holding entity, which actually owns the business’ assets.  With this structure, the small business owner can eliminate, or at the very least substantially limit, liability for both the personal and business debts.

In summary, the operating entity conducts all of the business’s activities and, thus, bears all the risk of loss.  The operating entity liability is limited because the operating entity contains a limited amount of assets.  The holding entity holds the majority of the assets but it is not responsible for the operating entity’s debts.  This strategy is more effective when done with LLCs rather with Corporations or other business entities because of the “charging orders” limitations in Florida.

The holding entity is where the majority of the assets of the business are located.  But because the holding company conducts no business activities, it has almost no exposure to liability, and therefore these assets are protected.  Thus, the business most valuable assets should be owned by the holding entity who then leases these assets (i.e., warehouse, equipment, etc) to the operating company, who then provides a way of taking vulnerable cash out of the operating entity in the form of lease payments.  In addition, the holding entity can loan money to the operating entity to buy assets, after which it would secure the loan with liens that run to the holding entity.  This strategy is even more important when assets carry an especially high risk of injury.

When done properly this structure could help in isolating creditors.  However, it very important that the proper formalities and structure are followed to avoid successful court challenges.  Again, you should consult with an attorney to avoid the pitfalls of improper structure.

Exempt Assets.  A good rule of thumb is to never, whenever possible, transfer exempt assets to a business entity.  This is because exempted property is considered unreachable by your creditors.  However, asset exemptions are available only to “natural persons” and not to business entities.  Thus, these assets inside a business entity are fully subject to the claims of business creditors.

Every state has a list of exempt assets.  For example, Florida has over thirty (30) separate exemptions.  The most popular being the homestead exemption.  The Florida Constitution provides that the homestead of a natural person is exempt from a forced sale or seizure by a creditor.  In order to qualify for the homestead exemption, the property, located in Florida, must serve as a residence of the owner or his family.  There are some rules that you should consider in relation to size, liens and bankruptcy law but for the most part this is the general rules for homestead property in Florida.

As a general rule, in states like Florida where the homestead is “unlimited”, ideally, you should pay-off your mortgages and other liens secured by the property.  You should do this because the cash used, non-exempt for asset protection purposes, to make the payments will be converted to exempt property by reducing the mortgages and liens encumbering the homestead.

For example, assume John Doe, a Florida resident, owns a home in Florida worth $400,000 that is subject to a $250,000 mortgage.  John’s homestead protection of $400,000 is ineffective against the $250,000 mortgage.  A mortagee can foreclose your homestead to collect the unpaid mortgage.  Now, let assume John Doe has $250,000 in cash.  Cash is a non-exempt asset and is subject to your creditors.  If John Doe can afford paying off the $250,000 mortgage with the cash he will effectively convert a non-exempt asset (cash) to an exempt asset.  First, John eliminates the $250,000 encumbrance in the homestead.  Second, the cash ($250,000) is now unavailable to his creditors.

Effective Asset Protection.  Asset protection planning is meant for the worst-case scenario.  It is important that as a small business owner you take asset protection seriously.  small business owners lack the unlimited resources of big corporations and even the smallest of the judgment could wreck the dreams and limited resources of the small business owner.

It is important also that your asset protection plan offers flexibility.  Most asset protection plans are meant to last for a long time.  Inevitably changes in the law and your factual situation (i.e., divorce) will occur.  Also, in developing an asset protection strategy there should be an answer for “What if this happens?” and “How my plan protects me against X or Y?”

The final goal of asset protection planning is cost efficiency.  We only discussed the tip of the iceberg is asset protection planning.  There are more complex plans that are beyond the scope of this article (i.e., offshore trust, etc).  A cost effective plan will increase the possibility of a well maintained plan that would translate in a more effective plan.

Finally, you should have your asset protection plan in advance of any legal difficulty.  The poorest candidate for planning is the small business owner in the midst of a crisis.  Even here, however, steps can be taken, albeit cautiously, to protect assets.  It is very important in situation like this one you should seek the advice of an attorney.

Call Connie Dello Buono for financial advisors and other experts 408-854-1883 motherhealth@gmail.com CA Life Lic 0G60621 for financial strategies, financial tools, opening exempt assets, risk protection and tax efficient ways of financial plan to serve your current and future finance needs. I work with team of estate planners, CPA, lawyers and insurance agents.

I am your financial advisor working with a team of specialists, investment advisors and other life coaches

Dear Sir,

Let me help you with financial strategies to serve your important financial planning needs to balance the financial aspect of your life.

Tell me what do you think of your financial advisor. I am not your investment advisor but a holistic financial advisor who also works with investment analyst/advisors and other specialists.

What makes you rate your financial advisor a 10? I will observe the values you value most from a financial advisor to be part of my service.

What do you expect the financial advisor will do for you? I will help you plan your savings, asset protection, retirement plans, tax diversification strategies, asset allocation, long term care,wealth transfer and other important financial plans.

Should your financial advisor advise you to lease or buy your car? I will coordinate all your finance related decisions to ensure your interests are served and you do not incur a lost opportunity cost.

You may ask me anything that relates to finances and I will coordinate them for you. I will be there to help you do the leg work for all your finance related decisions.

I am your holistic financial coach or advisor coordinating all other life and finance coaches.

I am your finance advisor coordinating all strategic financial plans and life plans. And the first step is establish your wealth accumulation account or savings account. When your savings habit becomes automatic in a separate savings account, you can spend guilt free knowing that you are savings each month. Forcing saving in early years of your life beats rate of return. I am your coach and will ensure that you are ready for any threats to the future: unnecessary spending, lack of discipline to save for future needs, lack of protection and other financial planning threats.

If you seek financial information, who do you go to? Seek a financial advisor who can help you lower your taxes, a portfolio you can touch (liquid) or use when a need arise and ensures that you are not in red with risk protection in terms of asset allocation and income taxes.

I enhanced my practice and I wanted to accomplish the following for my clients by asking the following questions:

  1. Do you have a personal umbrella insurance/policy?
  2. Do we have your investments?
  3. Do you have an assessment of your Human Life Value, HLV?
  4. Do you have a will and living trust?
  5. Would you join me to a 90-day client appreciation day?

I will ensure the holistic coordination of all your finance related needs and be your personal finance concierge.  I will ensure that I can serve you and review your finances every 90 days.

Hoping to serve you based on your level of expectations for a holistic financial advisor ensuring your asset protection and wealth accumulation/transfer goes well based on your lifetime goals.

I have been serving doctors, family oriented savers, business owners and professionals in the bay area. And my goal is to ensure that you have a good experience working with me as your financial advisor so that you can refer me to others.

Sincerely,

Connie Dello Buono

CA Life 0G60621

408-854-1883
motherhealth@gmail.com
San Jose. San Ramon. San Mateo

Pay yourself first, car and housing are major expenses

monthly budget

monthly budget

Contact Connie Dello Buono 408-854-1883 motherhealth@gmail.com for finance coaching and motivating you to save for your future and be ready for financial and health threats.