Connection between light sensitive nerve cells in eyes and brain that regulate mood

What I Learned About Eye Floaters

TURMORANGEPINEby Claire Cox

What I Learned About Eye Floaters

an-eye-chart-to-test-visionI am a retired Certified Ophthalmic Medical Technologist, so let me begin by giving you my “professional” opinion. Floaters were a common complaint I heard about, and this is what I used to tell patients. Some of it is actually good advice!

The eye has two compartments filled with different gel-like substances. At the front of the eye is aqueous, but the bulk of the eye is filled with vitreous, which is water and collagen, and it can break down as we age. When it breaks down it forms little bubbles and those bubbles cast a shadow on the retina, generating the appearance of dark spots floating around in the visual field. These spots are harmless and may fade, but will likely remain visible for the rest of your life. People tend to get used to them and they become less annoying. If it becomes so severe that it impairs the vision, there is a surgical technique to suck the vitreous out and replace it, but it is quite risky and expensive.

Read more: Natural Options for Treating Eye Floaters

Why You Should Not Ignore Your Eye Floaters

Floaters can be a very serious warning sign of a potentially blinding condition. If your floaters seem to form a web or a curtain, or if they are accompanied by flashes of light you need to get to an ophthalmologist IMMEDIATELY. The vitreous is adhered to the retina, and when the vitreous degrades it can pull the retina off. If you catch it early, the retina can be “tacked” back on with a laser quickly and almost painlessly. If it goes on too long, the retina requires major surgery and if it goes too far you loose the vision in that eye. There is no saving it once the retina peels off your macula (the central “sweet spot” of vision is processed there). If there is any pain, you ought to be checked out by a doctor. Floaters should never be painful.

Officially, and essentially, floaters themselves are harmless and there is no treatment, so get used to them. This is what I learned, and repeated many times. Then one day I got floaters and suddenly the advice I had given for decades was not adequate. I did go see an ophthalmologist. The risk of blindness is serious and I was not playing around. His assistant was a former co-worker who dutifully gave me the same advice I had been giving when I was a “professional” in the field. I was told my vitreous had not detached, but it probably would within the month based on my symptoms. Vitreous detachment is not as serious as retinal detachment, but can lead to a retinal detachment.

Read more: The Medicine Your Grandmother Used

My Home Cure for Eye Floaters

I am not a doctor, but I am more than willing to play one on myself, and so I applied my general knowledge of alternative healing to the problem. I figured I had two problems that needed to be addressed: 1) inadequate blood supply to my eye, and 2) collagen breakdown.

Improving the blood supply to my eye was a goal based on the simple premise that when there is decreased health in the tissues, it will boil down to the cells not getting enough oxygen. I went with citrus bioflavanoids, a supplement well known to strengthen blood vessels. To help build up collagen, I began taking glucosamine and chondroitan. Within 2 weeks, I cancelled my follow up appointment, the floaters had dissolved.

If you do not have access to these supplements, try a diet rich in the same nutrients. The white part of orange peels is an excellent source of bioflavanoids. But there are tastier sources like red bell peppers, garlic, and strawberries. Glucosamine and chondroitan are a bit trickier to get large doses of in your diet. I would make a good bone sauce, and a nice jambalaya where you eat the seafood – shells and all, and eat lots of them both.


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Tips: Drink fresh juice of carrots, orange, pineapple and add turmeric powder. Deep breathing IN thru noise and out thru mouth. Sleep early and adequately. Detox parasites and fungus in the body. Get Vitamin D from the sun. Strengthen collagen and blood vessels with ginger, soft boiled eggs and Vitamin C. And more. Email motherhealth@gmail.com

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MSM powder benefits – Alzheimer is a sulfur deficiency

sulfur 11MSM powder benefits

1. MSM powder benefits our bodies by helping absorb more nutrients (vitamins and minerals). 

Co-enzyme Q10 locks with MSM, which means that in order for the body to fully utilize this nutrient, it must have MSM(sulfur) with it. Pantothenic acid, Vitamins A, D, and E, inter-enzymes, amino acids, selenium, calcium, germanium, collagnol and dismuzyme are just some of the things we know the body does not utilize properly unless it has MSM to lock with. A lot of the vitamins we take go through the body without being fully used. With more MSM in the body, vitamins can be utilized more effectively and therefore become much more beneficial.

There is a joke that Americans have the most expensive urine in the world because of all the vitamins that go down the drain. Vitamin C does a lot of healing by itself, but without MSM to lock with, it doesn’t toughen capillary walls. When MSM is added to the diet and taken with Vitamin C, chronic nosebleeds, easy bruising and varicose veins may be relieved. Vitamin C and MSM work synergistically together. Every body is different, so you would need to find what works for you, but it is important when taking Vitamin C to make certain it has the bioflavinoids with it because it is then a complete food. Nature’s vitamins (from fresh food) are the best because they contain the whole complexes without which the body can’t do its job, which is to maintain and repair the bodily systems. Without enough MSM, the body can’t do its job properly.

2. MSM powder increases oxygen availability to the body. 

There are people who have had emphysema, who used an atomizer for breathing and could hardly get out of the chair to walk across the room, who, after about a week of taking MSM, walked a half mile, rested and then walked another half mile. Now that is not because emphysema had been reversed, but because the MSM detoxifies and increases the blood’s circulation of oxygen. MSM benefits the body by helping to get oxygen into the blood a lot more efficiently with the same amount of work.

3. MSM powder helps increase energy. 

Another MSM benefit is that energy levels increase because MSM helps make the cell walls more permeable. Our cell walls get thicker and more rigid with age; this tends to create a lessening of the amount of nutrients and oxygen that can enter the cell through the cell wall. Also, toxins which get stored in the cell get trapped within the cells because of the lower permeability of the cell wall. When MSM goes into the body the permeability of the cell walls greatly increases, enhancing the absorbtion of nutrients and oxygen and helping release the toxins which were stuck in cells. When these toxins leave the body, it helps to increase our energy.
A good example of this at work shows up in diabetics. When their blood carries sugar to their cells, the sugar cannot be absorbed due to the impermeability of the cell wall. Studies show that when MSM goes into the body it causes the cell wall to be more permeable again. The pancreas (which requires sulfur to make insulin) normalizes because it doesn’t work so hard–blood sugar can now be absorbed through the cell walls, helping to balance the blood sugar level. Because sulfur is a component of insulin (the protein hormone secreted by the pancreas that is essential to carbohydrate metabolism), a lack of nutritional sulfur in the diet can result in low insulin production by the pancreas. Thus, for the diabetic individual, MSM is extremely helpful in improving their overall energy levels.
There have been reports of long term diabetics injecting insulin daily for years, who have in five weeks to two months become self-regulating and stopped having mood swings. The blood sugar had stabilized. Studies suggest, in those with diabetes, that the cell wall may be more leathery and thus the absorption of sugar by the cells is greatly reduced.

4. MSM powder benefits the body by eliminating toxins including lactic acid build-up from strenuous exercise. 
Drinking plenty of water is very important for anyone wishing to have good health. The fact that MSM detoxifies means that you need to keep water moving into the body so that the toxins can be eliminated without stressing other organs of the body, such as the kidneys.

5. MSM powder benefits the body by helping to dramatically reduces recuperation time from strenuous exercise and long hours of work.

6. MSM powder helps relieve muscular aches and pains.

7. MSM powder benefits the body by reducing inflammation due to injury or inflammatory diseases such as arthritis. 

When the water pressure inside a cell is greater than the water pressure on the outside of the cell, there is inflammation and swelling. (The outer and intercellular fluid pressures are not equal.) MSM enhances the permeability of the cell walls, therefore allowing the pressure on both sides of the wall to equalize, thus relieving the inflammation. MSM takes inflammation out of soft tissue and since pain comes from nerves in inflamed soft tissue, there is often relief from the pain of such inflammatory ailments as arthritis, bursitis, rheumatism and hip dysplasia. Another benefit of MSM is that is can help get the flexibility back into the tissues very rapidly. Some people have experienced relief in only 20 minutes! For others, it takes longer.

8. MSM, together with Vitamin C (a free radical scavenger) helps the body build healthy new cells.

9. MSM, along with Vitamin C, helps reduce scar tissue and wrinkles, and helps keep the skin more elastic.

10. MSM, along with Vitamin C, helps the hair and nails grow stronger and faster.

11. MSM has been shown to improve mental alertness.

12. MSM has been proven to help in the reduction and even the total elimination of allergies. 
When MSM is added to the diet, anti-allergy medication may be sharply reduced or eliminated.

13. MSM benefits women by reducing headaches, cramps and muscle pain caused by hormonal imbalances, for example, PMS. 
Women who have had monthly menstruation problems often no longer experience the headaches, cramps or muscle plain associated with their periods. Many women have these problems because their hormones are out of balance. The monthly cycle can be a shock to the system. When the hormones are brought into balance, the body functions normally and these painful problems can be vastly reduced or eliminated.

14. MSM helps relieve constipation. 
MSM benefits include helping control chronic constipation. Many older people seem to have this problem and it can be a real medical concern. Reportedly many people suffering from constipation have had prompt and continuing relief by supplementing their diet with MSM. A good amount of Vitamin C along with the MSM has proven to be helpful for this condition.

15. MSM has been shown to help reduce and even eliminate snoring.

16. MSM helps reduces eye membrane irritation (when MSM in a water solution is applied).
MSM is the 4th most plentiful mineral in the body, and so essential to life that it is found in every cell of virtually every animal and plant.

Some Symptoms of Sulfur Deficiency

1. Scar Tissue
2. Wrinkles
3. Damaged Skin
4. Lung Disfunction
5. Diabetes
6. Sore Joints and Muscles
7. Ulcers
8. Migrane Headaches
9. Alzheimers
10. Allergic Reactions
11. Candida Infections, Chronic Fatigue
12. Cholesterol
13. Diverticulosis


For quality supplementation, visit:

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Protect your eyes and kidneys with anti-oxidants

Moderate exercise combined with dietary vitamins C and E counteracts oxidative stress in the kidney and lens of streptozotocin-induced diabetic-rat.

Abstract

Oxidative stress has a key role in the pathogenesis of diabetes-induced cataract formation and nephropathy.

Daily moderate exercise and vitamins C and E (VCE) supplementation can be beneficial to diabetes due to reducing blood glucose and free radical production.

The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of moderate exercise with vitamin VCE on lipid peroxidation (LP) and antioxidative systems in the kidneys and lens of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Forty female Wistar rats were used.

They were randomly divided into four groups. The first and second groups were used as control and diabetic groups. The third group was the diabetic-exercise group. VCE-supplemented feed was given to diabetic-exercise rats constituting the fourth group. Animals in the exercised groups were moderately exercised daily on a treadmill for three weeks (five days a week).

Diabetes was induced on day zero of exercise. Body weights in the four groups were recorded weekly. Lens and kidney samples were taken from all animals on day 20.

Glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), reduced glutathione (GSH), vitamin E, and beta-carotene levels in kidney and lens, albumin in plasma, and body weight were significantly lower in the diabetic group than in the control group, whereas there was a significant increase in LP of kidney and lens as well as plasma glucose, urea, and creatinine levels in the diabetic group.

The decrease in antioxidant enzymes, vitamins, and albumin and the increase in LP and glucose levels in diabetic rats were significantly improved with exercise and VCE supplementation. In the diabetic animals, the decreased beta-carotene and vitamins A levels in kidney did not improve through exercise only, although their levels were increased by exercise plus VCE supplementation.

In conclusion, these data demonstrate that lipid peroxidation increases in the lens and kidney of diabetic animals and this could be due to decreases in antioxidant vitamins and enzymes.

However, dietary VCE with moderate exercise may strengthen the antioxidant defense system through the reduction of ROS and blood glucose levels.

The VCE supplementations with exercise may play a role in preventing the development of diabetic nephropathy and cataract formation in diabetic animals.


Ditch any obsession with “anti-aging.” It actually accelerates aging! People with negative feelings about their age die 7.5 years sooner than people who embrace their age, found one study.

Effects of antioxidant supplementation on insulin sensitivity, endothelial adhesion molecules, and oxidative stress in normal-weight and overweight young adults.

Vincent HK1Bourguignon CMWeltman ALVincent KRBarrett EInnes KETaylor AG.

Author information

Abstract

The objective of the study was to determine whether short-term antioxidant (AOX) supplementation affects insulin sensitivity, endothelial adhesion molecule levels, and oxidative stress in overweight young adults.

A randomized, double-blind, controlled study tested the effects of AOXs on measures of insulin sensitivity (homeostasis model assessment [HOMA]) and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index), endothelial adhesion molecules (soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular adhesion molecule, and endothelial-leukocyte adhesion molecule-1), adiponectin, and oxidative stress (lipid hydroperoxides) in overweight and normal-weight individuals (N = 48, 18-30 years).

Participants received either AOX (vitamin E, 800 IU; vitamin C, 500 mg; beta-carotene, 10 mg) or placebo for 8 weeks. The HOMA values were initially higher in the overweight subjects and were lowered with AOX by week 8 (15% reduction, P = .02). Adiponectin increased in both AOX groups.

Soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and endothelial-leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 decreased in overweight AOX-treated groups by 6% and 13%, respectively (P < .05). Plasma lipid hydroperoxides were reduced by 0.31 and 0.70 nmol/mL in the normal-weight and overweight AOX-treated groups, respectively, by week 8 (P < .05).

Antioxidant supplementation moderately lowers HOMA and endothelial adhesion molecule levels in overweight young adults.

A potential mechanism to explain this finding is the reduction in oxidative stress by AOX.

Long-term studies are needed to determine whether AOXs are effective in suppressing diabetes or vascular activation over time.

Antioxidant supplementation lowers exercise-induced oxidative stress in young overweight adults.

Vincent HK1Bourguignon CMVincent KRWeltman ALBryant MTaylor AG.

Author information

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether antioxidant (AOX) supplementation attenuates post-exercise oxidative stress and contributors to oxidative stress (inflammation, blood lipids) in overweight young adults.

RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES:

This was a randomized, double-blind, controlled study. Overweight (BMI, 33.2 +/- 1.9 kg/m(2)) and comparative normal-weight (BMI, 21.9 +/- 0.5 kg/m(2)) adults 18 to 30 years old (total N = 48) were enrolled. Participants received either daily antioxidant (AOX) treatment (800 IU of vitamin E, 500 mg of vitamin C, 10 mg of beta-carotene) or placebo (PL) for 8 weeks for a total of four groups. All participants completed a standardized 30-minute cycle exercise bout at baseline and 8 weeks. Exercise-induced changes in lipid hydroperoxide (DeltaPEROX), C-reactive protein (DeltaCRP), interleukin-6 (DeltaIL-6), cholesterol subfractions, triglycerides, total AOX status (DeltaTAS), and adiponectin were assessed.

RESULTS:

Exercise-induced DeltaPEROX was lower in the overweight-AOX group (0.09 nM/kg per min) compared with PL-treated overweight and normal-weight groups (0.98, 0.53 nM/kg per min) by 8 weeks (p < 0.05). Adiponectin was increased in both overweight and normal-weight AOX groups (22.1% vs. 3.1%; p < 0.05) but reduced in PL groups. DeltaIL-6, Deltatotal cholesterol, and Deltalow-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations during exercise were lower in the AOX-treated groups compared with PL groups (all p < 0.05). After controlling for BMI, the Deltatotal cholesterol, Deltalow-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, Deltaadiponectin, and DeltaTAS explained 59.1% of the variance of the regression model of the DeltaPEROX by 8 weeks (total model R(2) = 0.600; p = 0.015).

DISCUSSION:

AOX lowers exercise-induced oxidative stress in overweight adults. Inflammatory and lipid markers may also be attenuated with AOX. Further studies are needed to determine whether AOX may be used in cardiovascular disease prevention in the overweight population.

 

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http://www.clubalthea.pxproducts.com

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Study: Noninvasive eye imaging may detect early signs of Alzheimer’s

Study: Noninvasive eye imaging may detect early signs of Alzheimer’s

 

study led by researchers at Cedars-Sinai and NeuroVision Imaging LLC provides a scientific basis for using noninvasive eye imaging to essentially detect signs of Alzheimer’s. The experimental technology, developed by Cedars-Sinai and NeuroVision, scans the retina using techniques that can identify beta-amyloid protein deposits that mirror those in the brain.

Accumulations of neurotoxic beta-amyloid protein can be detected with positron emission tomography, or PET scans, and analysis of cerebrospinal fluid. But these are invasive, inconvenient and costly, according to the study. making them impractical for routine screening and follow-up evaluation.

“This is the first study demonstrating the potential to image and quantify retinal findings related to beta-amyloid plaques noninvasively in living patients using a retinal scan with high resolution,” said Dr. Maya Koronyo-Hamaoui, an associate professor of neurosurgery and biomedical sciences and a research scientist at the Maxine Dunitz Neurosurgical Institute at Cedars-Sinai, in a statement. Koronyo-Hamaoui is also a co-founder, inventor and scientist at NeuroVision. She is the senior leading author of an article in JCI Insight published online Aug. 17.

“This clinical trial is reinforced by an in-depth exploration of the accumulation of beta-amyloid in the retina of Alzheimer’s patients versus matched controls, and a comparison analysis between retina and brain pathologies,” she said. “Findings from this study strongly suggest that retinal imaging can serve as a surrogate biomarker to investigate and monitor Alzheimer’s disease,”

“As a developmental outgrowth of the central nervous system that shares many of the brain’s characteristics, the retina may offer a unique opportunity for us to easily and conveniently detect and monitor Alzheimer’s disease,” said Dr. Keith L. Black, chairman of NeuroVision, chair of the department of neurosurgery and director of the Maxine Dunitz Neurosurgical Institute at Cedars-Sinai, in a statement. “We know that Alzheimer’s begins as many as 10 or 20 years before cognitive decline becomes evident, and we believe that potential treatments may be more effective if they can be started early in the process. Therefore, screening and early detection may be crucial to our efforts to turn the tide against the growing threat of this devastating disease.”

Steven Verdooner, NeuroVision CEO, said in a statement that the imaging system harnesses the company’s expertise in autofluorescence imaging of the retina using a specialized ophthalmic camera and sophisticated image processing software.

“It’s exciting to see these studies demonstrating the power of the technology applied to the Alzheimer’s field,” said Verdooner. “Our goal is to develop a product that is easy to use, affordable and widely accessible. We look forward to the potential of retinal imaging playing a vital role in solving the problem of Alzheimer’s, both in identifying and monitoring those who may be affected by the disease. Our next step is to continue with clinical trials, building upon the existing pharmaceutical company collaborations, to ensure our technology is ready for the medical community to help manage this disease.”

The study’s first author, Yosef Koronyo, a research associate at Cedars-Sinai and a scientist and inventor at NeuroVision, said in a statement that the latest findings cap a decade of study that has produced several landmark discoveries.

“In 2010, our research group published an article providing the first evidence for the existence of Alzheimer’s-specific plaques in the human retina, and we demonstrated the ability to detect individual plaques in live mouse models using a modified ophthalmic device,” said Koronyo.

After adapting the technology for human application, the researchers kickstarted several ongoing clinical trials in the United States and Australia to determine the feasibility of detecting, and quantifying, beta-amyloid plaques in patients with the disease.

In the new article, the researchers report on a 16-patient clinical trial to demonstrate the feasibility of identifying beta-amyloid in the eye using autofluorescence imaging. They also provide detailed analyses and several new findings on Alzheimer’s pathology in the retina, results of research with donated eyes and brains of 37 deceased patients, 23 with confirmed Alzheimer’s disease and 14 controls.

The researchers reported a 4.7-fold increase in retinal plaque burden in patients with Alzheimer’s, compared to controls, and they provided observations regarding geometric distribution and layer location of amyloid pathology in the retina. With the imaging technology’s ability to detect autofluorescence signal related to retinal beta-amyloid, these findings may lead to a practical approach for large-scale identification of the at-risk population and monitoring of Alzheimer’s, the researchers said.

Funding for the study was provided by a National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Aging award, The Saban Family Foundation and The Marciano Family Foundation.


Connie will scan your blood in 6 sec, non-invasive, created by NIH that measures your blood anti-oxidant levels.

Fridays 6pm , Sat and Sunday noon at Whole  Foods Store, Cupertino.

Email motherhealth@gmail.com or text 408-854-1883

Join us to bring this scanner to all doctors’ offices. It is available in 50 countries.

Yale

anti oxidant scan

 

Lutein May Counter Cognitive Aging

Lutein May Counter Cognitive Aging

luetin 2.JPG

Summary: People with higher levels of lutein, a nutrient commonly found in kale and eggs, were more cognitively on par with younger people than their peers with lower lutein levels, a new study reports.

Source: University of Illinois.

Spinach and kale are favorites of those looking to stay physically fit, but they also could keep consumers cognitively fit, according to a new study from University of Illinois researchers.

The study, which included 60 adults aged 25 to 45, found that middle-aged participants with higher levels of lutein – a nutrient found in green leafy vegetables such as spinach and kale, as well as avocados and eggs — had neural responses that were more on par with younger individuals than with their peers. The findings were published in the journal Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience.

“Now there’s an additional reason to eat nutrient-rich foods such as green leafy vegetables, eggs and avocados,” said Naiman Khan, a professor of kinesiology and community health at Illinois. “We know these foods are related to other health benefits, but these data indicate that there may be cognitive benefits as well.”

Most other studies have focused on older adults, after there has already been a period of decline. The Illinois researchers chose to focus on young to middle-aged adults to see whether there was a notable difference between those with higher and lower lutein levels.

“As people get older, they experience typical decline. However, research has shown that this process can start earlier than expected. You can even start to see some differences in the 30s,” said Anne Walk, a postdoctoral scholar and first author of the paper. “We want to understand how diet impacts cognition throughout the lifespan. If lutein can protect against decline, we should encourage people to consume lutein-rich foods at a point in their lives when it has maximum benefit.”

Lutein is a nutrient that the body can’t make on its own, so it must be acquired through diet. Lutein accumulates in brain tissues, but also accumulates in the eye, which allows researchers to measure levels without relying on invasive techniques.

The Illinois researchers measured lutein in the study participants’ eyes by having participants look into a scope and respond to a flickering light. Then, using electrodes on the scalp, the researchers measured neural activity in the brain while the participants performed a task that tested attention.

“The neuro-electrical signature of older participants with higher levels of lutein looked much more like their younger counterparts than their peers with less lutein,” Walk said. “Lutein appears to have some protective role, since the data suggest that those with more lutein were able to engage more cognitive resources to complete the task.”

Image shows a brain.

Next, Khan’s group is running intervention trials, aiming to understand how increased dietary consumption of lutein may increase lutein in the eye, and how closely the levels relate to changes in cognitive performance.

“In this study we focused on attention, but we also would like to understand the effects of lutein on learning and memory. There’s a lot we are very curious about,” Khan said.

ABOUT THIS NEUROSCIENCE RESEARCH ARTICLE

Funding: This work was supported by the department of kinesiology and community health at the University of Illinois and the Hass Avocado Board.

Source: Anne Walk – University of Illinois
Image Source: NeuroscienceNews.com image is in the public domain.
Original Research: Full open access research for “The Role of Retinal Carotenoids and Age on Neuroelectric Indices of Attentional Control among Early to Middle-Aged Adults” by Anne M. Walk, Caitlyn G. Edwards, Nicholas W. Baumgartner, Morgan R. Chojnacki, Alicia R. Covello, Ginger E. Reeser, Billy R. Hammond, Lisa M. Renzi-Hammond and Naiman A. Khan in Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience. Published online June 9 2017 doi:10.3389/fnagi.2017.00183

University of Illinois “Lutein May Counter Cognitive Aging.” NeuroscienceNews. NeuroscienceNews, 25 July 2017.
<http://neurosciencenews.com/lutein-aging-cognition-7176/&gt;.

Abstract

The Role of Retinal Carotenoids and Age on Neuroelectric Indices of Attentional Control among Early to Middle-Aged Adults

One apparent consequence of aging appears to be loss of some aspects of cognitive control. This loss is measurable as early as mid-adulthood. Since, like many aspects of cognition, there is wide variance among individuals, it is possible that behavior, such as one’s diet, could drive some of these differences.

For instance, past data on older humans and non-human primates have suggested that dietary carotenoids could slow cognitive decline.

In this study, we tested how early such protection might manifest by examining a sample (n = 60) of 25–45 year olds. Carotenoid status was assessed by directly measuring macular pigment optical density (MPOD) which has shown to be highly correlated with the primary carotenoid in brain, lutein.

Cognitive control was measured using event-related potentials during the performance of cognitive control tasks designed to tap into different aspects of attentional (i.e., selective attention, attentional inhibition, and response inhibition) control. Our results showed that, across participants, MPOD was related to both age and the P3 component of participants’ neuroelectric profile (P3 amplitude) for attentional, but not response, inhibition.

Although younger adults exhibited larger P3 amplitudes than their older adult counterparts, older subjects with higher MPOD levels displayed P3 indices similar to their younger adult counterparts in amplitude.

Furthermore, hierarchical regression analyses showed that age was no longer a significant predictor of P3 amplitude when MPOD was included as a predictor in the model, suggesting that MPOD may partially contribute to the relationship between age and P3 amplitude. In addition, age and MPOD were shown to have independent associations with intraindividual variability of attentional control, such that younger individuals and individuals with higher MPOD showed less intraindividual variability.

These results show a relationship between retinal carotenoids and neuroelectric indices underlying cognitive control. The protective role of carotenoids within the CNS may be evident during early and middle adulthood, decades prior to the onset of older age.

“The Role of Retinal Carotenoids and Age on Neuroelectric Indices of Attentional Control among Early to Middle-Aged Adults” by Anne M. Walk, Caitlyn G. Edwards, Nicholas W. Baumgartner, Morgan R. Chojnacki, Alicia R. Covello, Ginger E. Reeser, Billy R. Hammond, Lisa M. Renzi-Hammond and Naiman A. Khan in Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience. Published online June 9 2017 doi:10.3389/fnagi.2017.00183