Trained and monitored caring caregivers are important in home care

  • Empowered staff with their customer experience successes
  • Informed teams of areas for improvement as patient experiences unfold
  • Enabled management, with actionable insights, to drive operational changes

Motherhealth trains and monitors its bayarea caregivers to have consistent care matching the home care needs of clients. This is very important for Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s clients.

card mother

What precautions are needed for those with genetic heart condition?

  1. get adequate sleep
  2. eat more veggies and citrus
  3. eat less iron rich foods such as red meat
  4. do light exercise and get adequate sunshine
  5. take folate, vitamin B complex and omega 3
  6. have less stress, get a mssage, laugh more, dance
  7. be with nature, eat more veggies, garden
  8. drink more, add ginger and turmeric in your drink

Quickly assesses live tissue cellular antioxidant levels

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Quickly assesses live tissue cellular antioxidant levels in response to ROS

Complete labs have there place but a portable biophotonic scan measuring your anti-oxidant level can help you find what is missing in your body with whole foods, exercise, sleep, de-stressing and supplementation ( using AgeLOC and other nutrients). Get a reading of your anti-oxidant in the bay area. Call or text Connie at 408-854-1883 or motherhealth@gmail.com. Doctors and nurses are welcome to get this scanner to help your patients. Free training on Sept 14-15 in Utah. Connie will also provide health coaching training before then.

We work with Acupuncture professionals such as the Golden State Warriors team acupuncturists, Author, Dr. Steven Rosenblatt MD, Ph D, LAc etc. and functional medicine Doc’s. This does not replace other labs but quickly assesses live tissue cellular antioxidant levels in response to ROS.

Invented by NIH.


Reclaim your health Now

For preventing diabetes, losing weight, clearing up inflammation and turning back the clock, join me at Health Care Network Alliance to measure your anti-oxidant level and supplements which impact your gene expression at :

AgeLoc Youth & lifepak Combo pack
Email Connie or join as consumer/distributor at:
Use my ID when completing the form:

  • Distributorship ID #: USW9578356

 

Link between fish consumption and cardiovascular (CV) health

This is a summary of a systematic review that evaluated the recent evidence regarding the effects of omega-3 fatty acids (FAs), primarily from marine oil supplements, on clinical and selected intermediate cardiovascular (CV) outcomes (i.e., blood pressure, lipid concentrations) and the association of omega-3 FA dietary intake and biomarkers with CV outcomes.

The systematic review included 147 articles published between 2000 and June 2015. Studies that analyzed levels of fish (or other food) consumption without exact quantification of omega-3 FA intake were excluded from this review.

This summary is provided to assist in informed clinical decisionmaking.

However, reviews of evidence should not be construed to represent clinical recommendations or guidelines.

Background

The first observation of a link between fish consumption and cardiovascular (CV) health was made in the late 1970s in a Greenland Eskimo population. This population exhibited a comparatively low rate of CV mortality and consumed a greater than average amount of fish. Since this original observation, there have been hundreds of studies conducted to evaluate the effect of omega-3 fatty acids (FAs) on cardiovascular disease (CVD), its risk factors, and its biomarkers.

The omega-3 FAs include eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), docosapentaenoic acid (DPA), and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). These are essential long-chain and very-long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids that have many physiological effects, including inflammation regulation. EPA, DHA, and DPA are found in fish and other seafood (called dietary marine oils), as well as in supplements prepared from these foods (referred to here as marine oil supplements). ALA is found in walnuts, leafy green vegetables, and oils such as canola, soy, and flaxseed.

An original systematic review of omega-3 FAs was prepared by the Agency for Healthcare and Research Quality in 2004.1,2 Based on the observational studies available at that time, several expert panels suggested that regular consumption of fish and seafood is associated with lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and cardiac death. The recommendations were based on assumptions of benefits from EPA and DHA and their content in fish and seafood.

The current systematic review aimed to update the evidence in light of the more recent literature published on the topic and included both randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies. Studies that analyzed levels of fish (or other food) consumption without exact quantification of omega-3 FA intake were excluded.

Conclusions

Observational studies suggest possible benefits of dietary intake of marine oils (such as through consumption of fish) for CV death and total stroke (mainly ischemic stroke).

In contrast, there is high strength of evidence (SOE) from RCTs that marine oil supplements do not affect the risk of major adverse cardiac events (MACE), all-cause death, sudden cardiac death, revascularization, or high blood pressure (BP). Marine oil supplements also have no effect on the risk of atrial fibrillation (moderate SOE). Importantly, RCTs focused primarily on marine oil supplements, not on food sources.

Marine oil supplements affect several intermediate outcomes. First, they significantly lower triglycerides (TGs)—possibly having greater effects in higher doses and in people with higher baseline TGs. Second, they cause small increases in both high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c). Finally, marine oil supplements produce small changes in the ratio of total cholesterol to HDL-c (high SOE).

Applicability of the Findings of This Review

  • The RCTs of marine oil supplements that focused on clinical CVD outcomes were mostly conducted in populations at increased risk for CVD (e.g., with diabetes, cardiometabolic syndrome, hypertension, dyslipidemia, or nondialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease) or with established CVD (e.g., a history of myocardial infarction, angina, stroke, or arrhythmia).
  • The RCTs of marine oil supplements that focused on intermediate CVD outcomes (e.g., BP, lipid concentrations) were conducted in three populations of interest—generally healthy, at increased risk for CVD, and with established CVD.
  • Most observational studies examined associations between dietary intake of marine oils and biomarkers of various omega-3 FAs individually and in combination with regard to long-term CVD events and were conducted in generally healthy populations.

Overview of Clinical Research Evidence on Dietary Marine Oils and Combined Marine Oil Supplements

  • Some evidence based on observational studies indicated that dietary intake of marine oils (including from fish) may be associated with lower risk of CVD death and total stroke (mainly ischemic stroke) in healthy populations (evidence low).
  • In RCTs, marine oil supplements had no effect on the risk of MACE, death from all causes, sudden cardiac death, and coronary revascularization (evidence high) and no effect on atrial fibrillation (evidence medium) in populations with established CVD or at increased risk for CVD (see Table 1).
  • In RCTs, consumption of marine oil supplements was associated with a statistically significant decrease in the concentration of TGs and a small but statistically significant increase in the concentrations of HDL-c and LDL-c (evidence high) in healthy populations and in those with established CVD or at increased risk for CVD (see Table 1).
  • Consumption of marine oil supplements also decreased the ratio of total cholesterol to HDL-c in all three population subgroups—generally healthy, at increased risk for CVD, and with established CVD (evidence high).
Table 1: Summary of Key Findings—Dietary and Supplemented Marine Oil Omega-3 Fatty Acids: Effects on and Associations With Cardiovascular and Intermediate Outcomes
Note: Most RCTs involved evaluations of supplements. Obs-intake represents observational studies of total dietary intake, and Obs-bio represents observational studies of fatty acid biomarkers.
Omega-3 FA [source] Outcome Key Findings Net Change or RCT Hazard Ratio (95% CI) Number and Type of Studies Strength of Evidence
bio = biomarker; BP = blood pressure; CI = confidence interval; DBP = diastolic blood pressure; DHA = docosahexaenoic acid; DPA = docosapentaenoic acid; EPA = eicosapentaenoic acid; HDL-c = high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; intake = total dietary intake; LDL-c = low-density lipoprotein cholesterol; FA = fatty acid; NA = not available; Obs = observational study; RCT = randomized controlled trial; SBP = systolic blood pressure
a Studies that reported combined EPA and DHA were analyzed together with studies that reported combined EPA, DHA, and DPA.
Marine oil (EPA + DHA ± DPA)a [mainly supplements or supplemented food] Major adverse cardiac events
  • No effect in RCTs
  • No association in Obs-intake
  • Unclear association in Obs-bio
0.96 (0.91, 1.02)
  • 10 RCTs
  • 3 Obs-intake
  • 2 Obs-bio
evidence high
All-cause death
  • No effect in RCTs
  • No association in Obs-intake
0.97 (0.92, 1.03)
  • 17 RCTs
  • 3 Obs-intake
evidence high
Sudden cardiac death
  • No effect in RCTs
  • No association in Obs-intake
1.04 (0.92, 1.17)
  • 9 RCTs
  • 1 Obs-intake
evidence high
Coronary revascularization
  • No effect in RCTs
  • No association in Obs-intake
NA
  • 6 RCTs
  • 1 Obs-intake
evidence high
Atrial fibrillation No effect in RCTs Inconsistent findings in Obs-intake NA
  • 3 RCTs
  • 3 Obs-intake
evidence medium
BP (SBP, DBP) No effect
  • SBP: 0.1 mmHg (–0.2, 0.4)
  • DBP: –0.2 mmHg (–0.4, 0.5)
29 RCTs evidence high
Triglycerides Decrease –24 mg/dL (–31, –18) 41 RCTs evidence high
HDL-c Increase 0.9 mg/dL (0.2, 1.6) 34 RCTs evidence high
LDL-c Increase 2.0 mg/dL (0.4, 3.6) 39 RCTs evidence high
Total cholesterol:HDL-c ratio Decrease –0.2 (–0.3, –0.1) 11 RCTs evidence high

Overview of Clinical Research Evidence on Individual Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplements

  • DHA: DHA supplements had no effect on BP or LDL-c (evidence medium). Evidence is low or insufficient to permit conclusions about the effects of or associations between DHA and any clinical outcome for CVD (see Table 2).
  • EPA or DPA: Evidence was low or insufficient to permit conclusions about the benefit of EPA or DPA, individually, on any clinical or intermediate outcome for CVD.
  • ALA: ALA supplements had no effect on BP or on concentrations of LDL-c, HDL-c, or TGs (evidence medium). Evidence was low or insufficient to permit conclusions about the effects of or associations between ALA and any clinical outcome for CVD (see Table 2).
Table 2: Summary of Key Findings—Individual Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplements: Effects on and Associations With Intermediate Outcomes
Note: Most RCTs involved evaluations of supplements. Obs-bio represents observational studies of fatty acid biomarkers.
Omega-3 FA [source] Outcome Key Findings Net Change or RCT Hazard Ratio (95% CI) Number and Type of Studies Strength of Evidence
ALA = alpha-linolenic acid; bio = biomarker; BP = blood pressure; CI = confidence interval; DBP = diastolic blood pressure; DHA = docosahexaenoic acid; HDL-c = high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; LDL-c = low-density lipoprotein cholesterol; FA = fatty acid; NA = not available; Obs = observational study; RCT = randomized controlled trial; SBP = systolic blood pressure
Purified DHA [supplements] BP (SBP, DBP) No effect NA 3 RCTs evidence medium
LDL-c No effect NA 3 RCTs evidence medium
ALA [supplements] BP (SBP, DBP)
  • No effect in RCTs
  • No association in Obs-bio
NA
  • 5 RCTs
  • 1 Obs-bio
evidence medium
LDL-c No effect NA 5 RCTs evidence medium
HDL-c No effect NA 5 RCTs evidence medium
Triglycerides No effect NA 5 RCTs evidence medium
Strength of Evidence Scale

High: evidence high
High confidence that the evidence reflects the true effect. Further research is very unlikely to change our confidence in the estimate of effect.

Moderate: evidence medium
Moderate confidence that the evidence reflects the true effect. Further research may change our confidence in the estimate of effect and may change the estimate.

Low: evidence low
Low confidence that the evidence reflects the true effect. Further research is likely to change our confidence in the estimate of effect and is likely to change the estimate.

Insufficient:evidence insufficient
Evidence is either unavailable or does not permit a conclusion.

 The overall evidence grade was assessed based on the ratings for the following domains: study limitations, directness, consistency, precision, and reporting bias. Other domains that were considered, as appropriate, included dose-response association, plausible confounding, and strength of association (i.e., magnitude of effect). For additional details on the methodology used to assess strength of evidence, please refer to: Owens DK, Lohr KN, Atkins D, et al. AHRQ series paper 5: grading the strength of a body of evidence when comparing medical interventions—Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and the Effective Health-Care Program. J Clin Epidemiol. 2010 May;63(5):513-23. PMID: 19595577.

Gaps in Knowledge and Limitations of the Evidence Base

  • Numerous differences exist between RCTs and observational studies, making comparisons across the two study designs difficult. For example, the doses of marine oil supplements (EPA + DHA) in RCTs were often much higher than the highest dietary intake of marine oils reported for observational studies. Additionally, few RCTs of omega-3 FA supplements attempted to control for background dietary fish or omega-3 FA intake. The response to supplementation may be modified by the background intake.
  • Studies assessed in this review used heterogeneous definitions for most CVD outcomes (e.g., MACE, CVD death, CHD death, CHD), which prohibited direct comparisons across studies in several instances.
  • Few studies compared the dose, formulation, or source of omega-3 FAs, which are all factors that may influence their effectiveness.
  • Long-term RCTs of marine oil supplements would need to be done to determine whether they can influence CV outcomes.
  • Evidence on the effects of or associations with omega-3 FAs based on population, demographic features, or cointerventions (e.g., patients also taking cholestrol-lowering statins, aspirin, or diabetes medications) was insufficient.

What To Discuss With Consumers

  • Dietary intake of marine oils (including from fish) appears to be associated with lower risk of CVD death and stroke in healthy populations.
  • Consumption of marine oil supplements has no effect on health outcomes such as all-cause death, sudden cardiac death, MACE, coronary revascularization, or atrial fibrillation in patients with established CVD or at increased risk for CVD.
  • Consumption of marine oil supplements lowers TG concentrations, raises HDL-c concentrations, and improves lipoprotein ratios (i.e., total cholesterol:HDL-c ratio) but also raises LDL-c concentrations.
  • Consumers considering a marine oil supplement are advised to check the labels for information on quality and purity. The U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention (USP) seal verifies a supplement’s quality.

Source

The information in this summary comes from Balk EM, Adam GP, Langberg V, Halladay C, Chung M, Lin L, Robertson S, Yip A, Steele D, Smith BT, Lau J, Lichtenstein AH, Trikalinos TA. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease: An Updated Systematic Review. Evidence Report/Technology Assessment No. 223. (Prepared by the Brown Evidence-based Practice Center under Contract No. 290-2012-00012-I.) AHRQ Publication No. 16-E002-EF. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; August 2016.

This summary was prepared by the John M. Eisenberg Center for Clinical Decisions and Communications Science at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX. It was written by Michelle Swick, Ph.D., Geetha Achanta, PhD., Frank Domino, M.D., and Michael Fordis, M.D.

References

  1. Balk E, Chung M, Lichtenstein A, et al. Effects of omega-3 fatty acids on cardiovascular risk factors and intermediate markers of cardiovascular disease. Evid Rep Technol Assess (Summ). 2004 Mar;(93):1-6. PMID: 15133887.
  2. Wang C, Chung M, Lichtenstein A, et al. Effects of omega-3 fatty acids on cardiovascular disease. Evid Rep Technol Assess (Summ). 2004 Mar;(94):1-8. PMID: 15133888.

Healthy red blood cells for oxygen delivery, preventing heart failure

  • RED BLOOD 1Oxygen delivery is facilitated by healthy red blood cells made every 120 days

  • The following helps in ensuring healthy red blood cells:
  • Exercise

  • De-stress , avoiding too much stress

  • Avoidance of alcohol

  • Avoidance of toxic medications/drugs

  • Carotenoids

  • Whole foods rich in iron, copper, Vitamin B complex (all Bs), Vitamin C, Vitamin D, folate

  • Erythropoietin, also known as EPO, hematopoietin or hemopoietin, is a hormone produced in the kidneys that controls red blood cell production (erythropoiesis) which can be sourced naturally from:
      • Echinacea

      • Astragalus

        Beetroot juice

      • Spirulina

    Dietary protein

    • Arachidonic acid

    • Cobalt

    • Portulaca oleracea L.

    • Rhodiola (Salidroside)

    • Rehmannia (Catalpol)

    • Emodin

    • Altitude training

    • Sauna