Anti-parasitic and anti Covid19 diet by Connie

Up to nearly 10% of Americans may be infected with brain parasites found in undercooked meat. One example is the brain-invasive pork tapeworm, which is the most common cause of adult-onset epilepsy. Allergenic fish worms found in nearly two-thirds of retail fish tested can trigger allergic reactions in sensitive individuals. There have been migratory skin worms found in undercooked fish (like in sushi). Cheese may contain mites and maggots and organ meats may contain other worms.

Cheese: asiago, bel paese, bleu/blue, brick, brie, camembert, emmental, gorgonzola, gruyere, muenster, port de salut, roquefort, stilton, swiss, pork

Nearly 95% of tested retail U.S. beef (including burgers) has been found to be parasite infested. The meat industry has responded to this problem by feeding arsenic to chickens and turkeys to reduce the parasite load; this arsenic may be linked to increased cancer risk in consumers, and adding bacteria-eating viruses to meat would not help one avoid the brain parasite, toxoplasma, the second leading cause of foodborne disease-related death in the United States. Being bitten by the external parasite, a lone star tick, may result in developing an allergy to meat.

Anti-parasitic diet by Connie Dello Buono

  • Avoid cheese, under-cooked meat, salads and produce not properly washed with vinegar or salt water, over ripe fruits, eat limes and berries, pineapple and papaya, sweet potatoes or yams, pine nuts, and eat less on fermented foods (except fiber-rich).
  • Consume less fat and sugar filled and processed foods but eat more fiber-rich foods, freshly cooked and well cooked. Combine meat with veggies. Eat less fermented veggies and alcohol drinks.
  • Add cabbage , tomatoes and lemon when cooking fish or meat to kill the parasites.  Boil milk if you wanted to drink 2% milk.  Add garlic, onions and sulfur rich foods in your meals daily. Eat well washed raw carrots and garlic.
  • Have a banana at night (not over ripe).
  • Avoid caffeine and chocolate until you have completed your anti-parasitic meds.
  • Lowering your fat intake from keto diet, lowers the supply of cholesterol for parasites to thrive.
  • Warm drink of decaf tea, soy milk, almond milk
  • Use all kinds of coconut from oil to milk.  Do not consume 3-day old rice or left over foods. Wear gloves when washing fish.
  • Promote good hygiene. Freeze fish for portion you cannot eat within 2 days.  Do not eat wilted veggies or moldy and rotten.

Up to nearly 10% of Americans may be infected with brain parasites found in undercooked meat. One example is the brain-invasive pork tapeworm, which is the most common cause of adult-onset epilepsy. Allergenic fish worms found in almost 66% of retail fish tested can trigger allergic reaction in delicate/sensitive people.

There have been migratory skin worms found in half-cooked fish (like in sushi). Cheese may contain parasites and slimy parasites and organ meats may contain different worms. Cheese: asiago, bel paese, bleu/blue, brick, brie, camembert, emmental, gorgonzola, gruyere, muenster, port de salut, roquefort, stilton, swiss, pork Nearly 95% of tested retail U.S. meat (including burgers) has been observed to be parasite plagued. 

The meat business has reacted to this issue by encouraging arsenic to chickens and turkeys to reduce the parasite load; this arsenic might be connected to increased of cancer risk in customers, and adding bacteria-eating viruses to meat would not help one to keep away the brain parasite, toxoplasma, the second leading reason for foodborne sickness related death  in the US. 

Being bitten by the outer parasite, a lone star tick, may result in developing an allergy to meat. Anti-parasite diet Avoid cheese, under-cooked meat, salads and produce not properly washed with vinegar or salt water, over ripe fruits, eat limes and berries, pineapple and papaya, sweet potatoes or yams, pine nuts, and eat less on fermented foods (except fiber-rich). Consume less fat and sugar filled and processed foods but eat more fiber-rich foods, freshly cooked and well cooked.

Combine meat with veggies. Eat less fermented veggies and alcohol drinks. Add cabbage, tomatoes and lemon when cooking fish or meat to kill the parasites. Boil milk if you wanted to drink 2% milk. Add garlic, onions and sulfur rich foods in your meals daily. Eat well washed raw carrots and garlic. Have a banana at night (not over ripe). Avoid caffeine and chocolate until you have completed your anti-parasitic meds.

Lowering your fat intake from keto diet, lowers the supply of cholesterol for parasites to thrive. Use all kinds of coconut from oil to milk. Do not consume 3-day old rice or left over foods. Wear gloves when washing fish. Promote good hygiene. Freeze fish for portion you cannot eat within 2 days. Do not eat wilted veggies or moldy and rotten.

More tips

  • Avoid simple carbohydrates, such as those found in refined foods, fruits, juices, dairy products, and all sugars, except honey.
  • Eat more raw garlic, pumpkin seeds, pomegranates, beets, and carrots, all of which have been used traditionally used to kill parasites. In one study, researchers found that a mixture of honey and papaya seeds cleared stools of parasites in 23 out of 30 subjects. Drink a lot of water to help flush out your system.
  • Eat more fiber, which may help get rid of worms.
  • Probiotics (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacilus plantarum, Saccharomyces boulardii, and bifidobacteria). Help keep your digestive tract healthy. Probiotics may not be appropriate in some severely immune compromised patients. Talk to your doctor.
  • Digestive enzymes will help restore your intestinal tract to its normal state, which makes it inhospitable to parasites. Papain is an enzyme from the papaya plant that may help kill worms when taken 30 minutes before or after meals. Papain may increase bleeding in people with clotting disorders, or in those taking blood-thinning medications, such as warfarin (Coumadin) among others.
  • Vitamin C. Supports the immune system. Lower the dose if diarrhea develops.
  • Vitamin A (VitA) is a micronutrient that is crucial for maintaining vision, promoting growth and development, and protecting epithelium and mucus integrity in the body. VitA is known as an anti-inflammation vitamin because of its critical role in enhancing immune function.
  • Zinc. Supports the immune system. Zinc may interact with certain medications, particularly some antibiotics, and it may not be appropriate for people with HIV/AIDS. Talk to your doctor.
  • Niacin deficiency in pellagra associated with certain parasites, seems to be due to the impairment in the further degradation of 3-hydroxykynurenine to niacin.

Herbs

Herbs are a way to strengthen and tone the body’s systems. As with any therapy, you should work with your doctor to diagnose your problem before starting treatment. You may use herbs as dried extracts (capsules, powders, or teas), glycerites (glycerine extracts), or tinctures (alcohol extracts). People with a history of alcoholism should not take tinctures.

Many of the herbs used to treat intestinal parasites have toxic side effects or interfere with other medications. Use them only under the supervision of a qualified practitioner. Your health care provider should treat you with the most gentle herb that is effective for the type of parasite you have. A few of the herbs that your provider might consider include:

  • Garlic (Allium sativum)
  • Barberry (Berberis vulgaris)
  • Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis)
  • Oregon grape (Berberis aquifolium)
  • Anise (Pimpinella anisum)
  • Wormwood ((Artemisia annua))
  • Curled mint (Mentha crispa)
  • Black walnuts (Juglans nigra)

For more related topics, see ebook of Connie Dello Buono at Balboa Press

https://www.balboapress.com/en/bookstore/bookdetails/807766-curated-health-tips-and-cancer-free-healing-ways

Parasite Treatment Fights Prostate Cancer

Cancer researchers at the University of Bergen (UiB) in Norway have been experimenting with hundreds of known drugs in recent years to see how they influence cancer cells.

Their most recent discovery shows that a medication prescribed for parasites, such as tapeworms and giardia, contains a substance that kills prostate and colon cancer cells.

“We discovered that this specific substance is blocking the signaling pathway in the cancer cells, and make them stop growing. It is not often that researchers discover a substance that targets specific molecules as precisely as this one,” says Professor Karl-Henning Kalland at the department of clinical science, at UiB and leader of the research group, in a statement.

His team’s research found nitazoxanide (NTZ), an approved anti-parasitic therapy, decomposed activated Beta-catenin.

Beta-catenin is a protein found in high amounts in both prostate and colon cancer cells. The protein is critical for tumor progression–its activation not only promotes cell division but makes the cancer cells more resistant and increases their chance of survival.

The research team found that NTZ hinders the activated Beta-catenin. However, it also appears that this hindering stimulates central parts of the immune system that attacks cancer cells.

“At the moment, we are working on how to strengthen our ongoing immune therapy against prostate cancer by using the mechanisms we discovered of the NTZ,” said Kalland.

Kalland and his research team is in the first phase in a clinical trial using immune therapy against prostate cancer (cryoIT).

The study is published in Nature Chemical Biology.

Uncooked meat and brain disorders

undercooked meat to brain disease

Toxoplasma gondii, a protozoan parasite about five microns long, infects a third of the world’s population. Ingested via undercooked meat or unwashed vegetables, the parasite infects 15-30 percent of the US population. In France and Brazil, up to 80 percent of the population has the infection.

Particularly dangerous during pregnancy – infection in pregnant women can cause serious congenital defects and even death of the fetus – this chronic infection has two components: the unicellular parasite, and inflammation of tissues it causes.

Working on mice (like all mammals, a natural host for this parasite), a University of California, Riverside team of biomedical scientists reports in the journal PLOS Pathogens that Toxoplasma infection leads to a disruption of neurotransmitters in the brain and postulates that it triggers neurological disease in those already predisposed to such a disease.

They note that Toxoplasma infection leads to a significant increase in glutamate – the primary and most important neurotransmitter in the brain, which transmits excitatory signals between neurons. This glutamate increase is “extracellular,” meaning outside the cell, and is strictly controlled by specialized cells in the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord), called astrocytes. Glutamate buildup is seen in traumatic brain injury as well as highly pathological and neurodegenerating diseases such as epilepsy, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

One role astrocytes play is to remove extracellular glutamate, lest it increase to pathological levels that could damage neurons. This is primarily achieved using a glutamate transporter, called GLT-1, tasked with regulating extracellular glutamate. GLT-1 soaks up glutamate released by neurons and converts it back into the safer substance glutamine, which can then be used by cells for energy.

“When a neuron fires it releases glutamate into the space between itself and a nearby neuron,” explained lead researcher Emma H. Wilson, an associate professor in the Division of Biomedical Sciences in the School of Medicine, who has worked on toxoplasmosis for more than 15 years. “The nearby neuron detects this glutamate which triggers a firing of the neuron. If the glutamate isn’t cleared by GLT-1 then the neurons can’t fire properly the next time and they start to die.”

Wilson and her team found that during toxoplasma infection, astrocytes swell and are not able to regulate extracellular glutamate concentrations. Further, GLT-1 is not expressed properly. This leads to a buildup of the glutamate released from neurons and the neurons misfire.

“These results suggest that in contrast to assuming chronic Toxoplasma infection as quiescent and benign, we should be aware of the potential risk to normal neurological pathways and changes in brain chemistry,” Wilson said.

When the researchers treated the infected mice with ceftriaxone, an antibiotic known to produce beneficial results in mouse models of ALS as well as neuroprotection in a variety of central nervous system injuries, they found that GLT-1 was upregulated. This restoration of GLT-1 expression significantly reduced extracellular glutamate from pathological to normal concentrations, returning neuronal function to a normal state.

“We have shown for the first time the direct disruption of a major neurotransmitter in the brain resulting from this infection,” Wilson said. “More direct and mechanistic research needs to be performed to understand the realities of this very common pathogen.”

Next, Wilson and her colleagues will research what initiates the downregulation of GLT-1 during chronic Toxoplasma infection.

“Despite the importance of this transporter to maintaining glutamate homeostasis, there is little understanding of the mechanism that governs its expression,” Wilson said. “We’d like to know how cells, including peripheral immune cells, control the parasite in the brain. Toxoplasma infection results in the lifelong presence of parasitic cysts within the neurons in the brain. We’d like to further develop a project focused on killing the cysts, which is where the parasite hides from the immune response for the rest of the infected person’s life. Getting rid of the cyst removes the threat of reactivation of the parasite and the risk of encephalitis while also allowing us to minimize chronic inflammation in the brain.”

Mysteriously, the parasite that causes toxoplasmosis can sexually reproduce only in cats. Asexually, it can replicate and live in any mammalian cell that has a nucleus. Indeed, the parasite has been found in every mammal ever tested.

Post-infection, a competent immune system is needed to prevent parasite reactivation and encephalitis. Infected people with compromised immune systems need to be on prophylactic drugs for life. Otherwise they are at risk of cyst reactivation and death. The parasite lives in areas of the brain that have the potential to disrupt certain behaviors such as risk-seeking (infected mice will run toward cat urine instead of away from it).

The parasite is not as latent or dormant as researchers once thought. Cases of congenital infection and retinal toxoplasmosis are on the rise (the brain and retina are closely linked). People who have schizophrenia are more likely to be infected with Toxoplasma. Infection shows some correlation with Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and epilepsy.

Nevertheless, Wilson notes that infection is no cause for major worry.

 

“We have been living with this parasite for a long time,” she said. “It does not want to kill its host and lose its home. The best way to prevent infection is to cook your meat and wash your hands and vegetables. And if you are pregnant, don’t change the cat litter.”

Explore further: New research investigates how the common ‘cat parasite’ gets into the brain


Infection in domestic cats

A number of studies have been presented in recent years showing that the toxoplasmosis parasite affects its host even during the dormant phase. It has, for example, already been observed that rats become unafraid of cats and even attracted by their scent, which makes them easy prey. This has been interpreted as the parasite assuring its survival and propagation, since the consumed rat then infects the cat, which through its faces can infect the food that other rats might then proceed to eat. A number of studies also confirm that mental diseases like schizophrenia, depression and anxiety syndrome are more common in people with toxoplasmosis, while others suggest that toxoplasmosis can influence how extroverted, aggressive or risk-inclined an individual’s behaviour is.

 


 

 

More information: PLOS Pathogens, dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pat.1005643

 

Journal reference: PLoS Pathogens search and more info website

 

Provided by: University of California – Riverside