When an old man died in the geriatric ward of a nursing home in an Australian country town, it was believed that he had nothing left of any value

When an old man died in the geriatric ward of a nursing home in an Australian country town, it was believed that he had nothing left of any value.
Later, when the nurses were going through his meager possessions, they found this poem. Its quality and content so impressed the staff that copies were made and distributed to every nurse in the hospital.

One nurse took her copy to Melbourne. The old man’s sole bequest to posterity has since appeared in the Christmas editions of magazines around the country and appearing in mags for Mental Health. A slide presentation has also been made based on his simple, but eloquent, poem.

And this old man, with nothing left to give to the world, is now the author of this ‘anonymous’ poem winging across the internet :

CRANKY OLD MAN

What do you see nurses? . . .. . .What do you see?
What are you thinking .. . when you’re looking at me?
A cranky old man, . . . . . .not very wise,
Uncertain of habit .. . . . . . . .. with faraway eyes?
Who dribbles his food .. . … . . and makes no reply.
When you say in a loud voice . .’I do wish you’d try!’
Who seems not to notice . . .the things that you do.
And forever is losing . . . . . .. . . A sock or shoe?
Who, resisting or not . . . … lets you do as you will,
With bathing and feeding . . . .The long day to fill?
Is that what you’re thinking?. .Is that what you see?
Then open your eyes, nurse .you’re not looking at me.
I’ll tell you who I am . . . . .. As I sit here so still,
As I do at your bidding, .. . . . as I eat at your will.
I’m a small child of Ten . .with a father and mother,
Brothers and sisters .. . . .. . who love one another
A young boy of Sixteen . . . .. with wings on his feet
Dreaming that soon now . . .. . . a lover he’ll meet.
A groom soon at Twenty . . . ..my heart gives a leap.
Remembering, the vows .. .. .that I promised to keep.
At Twenty-Five, now . . . . .I have young of my own.
Who need me to guide . . . And a secure happy home.
A man of Thirty . .. . . . . My young now grown fast,
Bound to each other . . .. With ties that should last.
At Forty, my young sons .. .have grown and are gone,
But my woman is beside me . . to see I don’t mourn.
At Fifty, once more, .. …Babies play ’round my knee,
Again, we know children . . . . My loved one and me.
Dark days are upon me . . . . My wife is now dead.
I look at the future … . . . . I shudder with dread.
For my young are all rearing .. . . young of their own.
And I think of the years . . . And the love that I’ve known.
I’m now an old man . . . . . . .. and nature is cruel.
It’s jest to make old age . . . . . . . look like a fool.
The body, it crumbles .. .. . grace and vigor, depart.
There is now a stone . . . where I once had a heart.
But inside this old carcass….. A young man still dwells,
And now and again . . . . . my battered heart swells
I remember the joys . . . . .. . I remember the pain.
And I’m loving and living . . . . . . . life over again.
I think of the years, all too few . . .. gone too fast.
And accept the stark fact . . . that nothing can last.
So open your eyes, people .. . . . .. . . open and see.
Not a cranky old man .
Look closer . . . . see .. .. . .. …. . ME!!

Remember this poem when you next meet an older person who you might brush aside without looking at the young soul within. We will all, one day, be there, too!

The best and most beautiful things of this world can’t be seen or touched. They must be felt by the heart!

Source: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10204267092067646&set=a.1209524488440&type=3

Family Involvement in the Nursing Home and Perceived Resident Quality of Life

Family Involvement in the Nursing Home and Perceived Resident Quality of Life

Abstract

Purpose of Study:

This study focuses on the relationship between family involvement and family perceptions of nursing home residents’ quality of life (QOL).

Design and Methods:

Resident and family variables from the 2012 Ohio Family Satisfaction Survey were merged with facility information from the Certification and Survey Enhanced Reports (CASPER). Hierarchical linear modeling was used to examine the association between family involvement and other predictors with perceived resident QOL.

Results:

Although most of the variability in family member perceptions of resident QOL was observed at the individual level (residents and families), characteristics of the facilities were also significantly associated with perceived resident QOL. Family involvement was a strong predictor of perceived resident QOL: Families who visited frequently and provided more help with personal care perceived lower resident QOL, while those who communicated frequently with facility staff had higher perceptions of resident QOL. Interestingly, the negative association between helping with more personal care and perceiving lower resident QOL was attenuated when family members communicated more regularly with facility staff. However, as family member age increased, the positive association between communication with facility staff and resident QOL diminished. Family members who are spouses, older, non-White, and highly educated perceived resident QOL as lower.

Implications:

Meaningful family involvement is a modifiable factor that can potentially enhance resident QOL. Facilities can become more family-oriented through encouraging communication between staff and families, helping spouses and other family members fulfill their desired caregiving role, and discussing the family’s motivations for providing personal care during visits.


Connie’s comments: We have a client in a care home who suffered stroke many years ago and is now 92, under hospice care and caregivers in care homes. During the last 5 years after her stroke, her daughter would visit every other day and massage her head. She lived for a long time because of her caring daughter and care givers.

Tag team in home care with family members and pay out of pocket for senior care expense

California Elder Care Costs for 2016

California Assisted Living Costs:

The average cost of assisted living in California in 2016 is $4,000 / month. In the most expensive areas of the state; Marin County, which includes the San Francisco area, San Mateo, San Luis Obispo, and Santa Cruz, the monthly cost ranges from $4,800 – $5,900. The least expensive assisted living can be found inland, in the cities of Madera, Merced, Stockton and Modesto. In these areas, the monthly cost is closer to $3,000.

Alzheimer’s residential care, also called Memory Care, can add as much as $1,100 to the monthly cost of assisted living.

California Home Care Costs:

The average hourly rate for home care across California is $23. The least expensive areas of the state for home care are Chico, Stockton, Vallejo, and Riverside where the cost is closer to $17 / hour. In Napa, San Jose, and San Mateo, the cost is approximately $27 / hour.

California Adult Day Care Costs:

Adult day care is the most affordable care option for seniors. In 2016, the average daily cost is $77. In San Jose, Chico, and Santa Rosa, it is more expensive, ranging from $90 – $125 / day. The least expensive areas of the state for adult day care are Stockton, Vallejo, and Visalia. Los Angeles is also slightly below the state’s average daily cost at $73 / day.

 

CA Financial Assistance Programs

Medi-Cal Waivers for the Elderly

Medicaid in California is called Medi-Cal. It is a program for disabled and elderly individuals and persons with limited income and resources. Through Medi-Cal, some personal care and nursing home care is provided. In addition, 4 programs (or “waivers”), also referred to as Home and Community Based Services waivers, are available that provide assistance for home care, adult day care, home modifications, and assisted living, to help prevent nursing home placement.

1) In some areas of California, Medi-Cal offers the Assisted Living Waiver, which help individuals who are eligible for nursing home care, but would prefer to live in an assisted living community. Read about the Assisted Living Waiver eligibility, benefits and locations.

2) The Multipurpose Senior Services Program (MSSP) Waiver helps nursing home eligible individuals that prefer to stay in their homes. It covers care management and supportive services, but doesn’t pay for medical care. This program unfortunately is not available in every county of California. Read about Medi-Cal MSSP Waiver eligibility requirements and benefits.

3) The Medi-Cal Nursing Facility / Acute Hospital (NF/AH) Waiver is a combination of several former waivers that helps nursing home eligible individuals receive care services, including medical care in their homes. This program also offers assistance to individuals currently residing in a nursing facility who wish to move back to their home. Read about NF/AH Waiver eligibility and benefits.

4) Medi-Cal’s Adult Day Health Care program has transitioned into the newly created Community Based Adult Services (CBAS) program. This program provides daytime care, meals, social activities, therapies, and skilled nursing. Functional needs must be met.

In order to qualify for the state Medicaid plan or one of the waivers, Medi-Cal has both income and asset qualifications. These limits depend on one’s age and marital status. As of 2016, a single elderly individual’s monthly income cannot exceed approximately $1,220 or $1,645 as a couple. An individual can qualify for Medi-Cal if the total value of their assets does not exceed $2,000, and for a couple, $3,000. One’s home and vehicle are not included in the asset calculation.

Persons with income and assets over these limits can still become eligible for Medi-Cal assistance. Individuals whose income exceeds the limit, but have high medical expenses may qualify through a Medi-Cal spenddown program called Share of Cost. Persons with assets valued over the limit might become eligible by working with a Medi-Cal planner to structure their resources appropriately. If there is some question regarding qualification, it is strongly recommended individuals contact a Medi-Cal Planner prior to application.

State (Non-Medicaid) Assistance Programs

California also offers assistance programs for the elderly that do not require an individual to qualify for Medicaid (Medi-Cal). Unfortunately, as of 2012, the budget for Alzheimer’s Day Care Resource Centers (ADCRC) was cut by the state. However, some Area Agency on Aging officesmay have funding to assist with the cost of adult day care.

The In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS) program is open to both Medicaid eligible and non-eligible persons and provides a variety of personal care supports to participants in their homes. This includes assistance with bathing, eating, dressing, meal preparation, housekeeping, and transportation assistance. This program allows individuals to choose the provider of their choosing, including family members. Read more about California IHSS eligibility and benefits

Another option for working families caring for a loved one is California Paid Family Leave. This program provides paid time off for working professionals, specifically to care for a family member.

Other Financial Options for Care

In addition to these state specific options that help pay for care, there are many non-profit and federal options. Use our Resource Locator Toolto find other programs that help pay for or reduce the cost of care.   There are also programs that help veterans with assisted living and there are eldercare loans available in California.

While reverse mortgages are available nationwide, California’s real estate values have resulted in two unique financial products which are alternatives to reverse mortgages and can be used to pay for elder care.  These are Rex Agreements and Equity Key. Unfortunately, as of March 2016, Equity Key was no longer taking applications. It currently is undetermined when they will begin accepting applications again.


Connie’s comments: Call 408-854-1883 for the most affordable senior care with live in caregivers for homebound bay area seniors.

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Get faster response when looking for a live-in caregiver for seniors in the bay area

You will be asked your city, how much you can afford and the day you need the caregiver. At Motherhealth, 408-854-1883, we can provide you with caregivers the next day as long as it is live-in even 2 hours away from the bay area.

We need to know if the client is bed-ridden and needs heavy lifting. And if you have long term care insurance. If you do not have long term care insurance, we try to fit the fee based on your budget.  For 24/7 care, we try to assign 2 caregivers, 3 and 4 days to prevent burn out. We ensure that our caregivers believe in our mission of caring for seniors like their own family.

We asked for weekly payments and that we will do the monitoring, training and hiring of caregivers. To hire our caregivers directly without us in the coordination efforts will cost extra.

It is recommended to hire a team like us to coordinate care together with you.

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