Reverse fatty liver with raw green and fruit juice blend – glutathione rich

fatty liver.JPG

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Alcoholic liver disease is a term that encompasses the liver manifestations of alcohol overconsumption, including fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, and chronic hepatitis with liver fibrosis or cirrhosis.[1]

It is the major cause of liver disease in Western countries. Although steatosis (fatty liver) will develop in any individual who consumes a large quantity of alcoholic beverages over a long period of time, this process is transient and reversible.[1] Of all chronic heavy drinkers, only 15–20% develop hepatitis or cirrhosis, which can occur concomitantly or in succession.[2]

The mechanism behind this is not completely understood. 80% of alcohol passes through the liver to be detoxified. Chronic consumption of alcohol results in the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha, Interleukin 6 [IL6] and Interleukin 8 [IL8]), oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, and acetaldehyde toxicity. These factors cause inflammation, apoptosis and eventually fibrosis of liver cells. Why this occurs in only a few individuals is still unclear. Additionally, the liver has tremendous capacity to regenerate and even when 75% of hepatocytes are dead, it continues to function as normal.

The risk factors presently known are:

  • Quantity of alcohol taken: Consumption of 60–80g per day (14g is considered one standard drink in the USA; drinking a six-pack of beer daily would be at the top of the range) for 20 years or more in men, or 20g/day (about 25 mL/day) for women significantly increases the risk of hepatitis and fibrosis by 7% to 47%,[1][4]
  • Pattern of drinking: Drinking outside of meal times increases up to 3 times the risk of alcoholic liver disease.[2]
  • Gender: Women are twice as susceptible to alcohol-related liver disease, and may develop alcoholic liver disease with shorter durations and doses of chronic consumption. The lesser amount of alcohol dehydrogenase secreted in the gut, higher proportion of body fat in women, and changes in fat absorption due to the menstrual cycle may explain this phenomenon.[2]
  • Hepatitis C infection: A concomitant hepatitis C infection significantly accelerates the process of liver injury.[2]
  • Genetic factors: Genetic factors predispose both to alcoholism and to alcoholic liver disease. Both monozygotic twins are more likely to be alcoholics and to develop liver cirrhosis than both dizygotic twins. Polymorphisms in the enzymes involved in the metabolism of alcohol, such as ADH, ALDH, CYP4502E1, mitochondrial dysfunction, and cytokine polymorphism may partly explain this genetic component. However, no specific polymorphisms have currently been firmly linked to alcoholic liver disease.
  • Iron overload (Hemochromatosis)
  • Diet: Malnutrition, particularly vitamin A and E deficiencies, can worsen alcohol-induced liver damage by preventing regeneration of hepatocytes. This is particularly a concern as alcoholics are usually malnourished because of a poor diet, anorexia, and encephalopathy.

Foods to Avoid with Fatty Liver

After going through all food groups, let’s go into specifics on the foods bad for the liver. These foods are mostly high on fat, cholesterol, and sugar (including artificial sweeteners).

You won’t be able to avoid them completely, and I’m not going to ask you to do so. But it must be controlled – and that’s what we’re going to do.

When you’re in a supermarket, look for the ingredients of every product you want to buy. If it’s high on fat or sugar, take only 1 or 2 units of these in whole shopping basket.

By avoid or drastically reducing unhealthy foods intake, you will make your liver’s life a lot easier and it will take the time to repair itself.

Name Properties Instructions
White bread
  • High in Carbs.
  • Spikes blood sugar.
  • Spikes insulin levels.
Replace with whole wheat bread. Make sure it has a “100% Whole Grain” stamp.
Butter
  • Extremely high on fat (81%).
  • OK to eat once in a while in its natural form.
  • Completely avoid foods that made from high amounts of butter, like cakes and Boreks.
Sugar-high Breakfast Cereals
  • High in sugar and artificial sweeteners.
  • Some high in fat.
  • Contains flavorings, preservatives, and unnatural colors.
Opt for cereals with 100% whole grains and select a cereal fortified with added vitamins and minerals and rich in fiber.
Fast foods: Hamburger, Pizza, French fries.
  • High on fatty oil.
  • High on cholesterol.
  • Extremely fattening.
Limit 2 slices of pizza per 2 weeks, and 1 hamburger per 3 weeks.
Carbonated drinks
  • High on sugar and/or artificial sweeteners..
Replace with calorie-free carbonated water or soda.
Red meat, such as beef and bison
  • Very high on fat.
  • Very high on cholesterol.
  • Hard to digest.
Avoid high fat steaks.
Bacon
  • High on sodium.
  • Increases blood pressure.
  • Increases chance of diabetes.
OK to eat few rashers per week.
High fat cheese
  • High on fat.
  • High on cholesterol.
Replace with reduced fat (5%-9%) cheese like Feta, Ricotta, Siren, etc.
Canned foods: Soups, meats or vegetables
  • Usually contain lots of salt, which is hard to process by a damaged liver.
Use garlic, pepper or spices to flavor foods instead of salt.
Chocolate, cakes, cookies, candies, and other sweets
  • High in sugar
  • Usually has artificial sweeteners, flavorings, preservatives, and unnatural colors.
  • Addictive.
Replace all sweats with dark chocolate, and limit yourself to 4 cubes per week.
Alcohol
  • High in calories.
  • The liver works hard to break down alcohol, and if consumed excessively, it could lead to liver damage.
  • Limit of completely avoid any type of alcohol.
  • If you must, drink low-alcohol beverages, such as Red Wine, up to one glass per week.
Eggs
  • Extremely high in Cholesterol.
  • Moderate amount of fat (10%).
  • High in Protein. 

 

  • No need to avoid – just limit yourself to 2 x eggs per week.
  • If you like omelets include 1 whole egg, and 2 more eggs with only the “white” part

GLUTATHIONE, the mother of all anti-oxidants by Mark Hyman M.D

Glutathione is the most important molecule you need to stay healthy and prevent disease — yet you’ve probably never heard of it. It’s the secret to prevent aging, cancer, heart disease, dementia and more, and necessary to treat everything from autism to Alzheimer’s disease. There are more than 89,000 medical articles about it — but your doctor doesn’t know how address the epidemic deficiency of this critical life-giving molecule …

What is it? I’m talking about the mother of all antioxidants, the master detoxifier and maestro of the immune system: GLUTATHIONE (pronounced “gloota-thigh-own”).

The good news is that your body produces its own glutathione. The bad news is that poor diet, pollution, toxins, medications, stress, trauma, aging, infections and radiation all deplete your glutathione.
This leaves you susceptible to unrestrained cell disintegration from oxidative stress, free radicals, infections and cancer.  And your liver gets overloaded and damaged, making it unable to do its job of detoxification.

In treating chronically ill patients with Functional Medicine for more than 10 years, I have discovered that glutathione deficiency is found in nearly all very ill patients. These include people with chronic fatigue syndrome, heart disease, cancer, chronic infections, autoimmune disease, diabetes, autism, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, arthritis, asthma, kidney problems, liver disease and more.
At first I thought that this was just a coincidental finding, but over the years I have come to realize that our ability to produce and maintain a high level of glutathione is critical to recovery from nearly all chronic illness — and to preventing disease and maintaining optimal health and performance. The authors of those 76,000 medical articles on glutathione I mentioned earlier have found the same thing!

So in today’s blog I want to explain what glutathione is, why it’s important and give you 9 tips that will help you optimize your glutathione levels, improve your detoxification system and protect help yourself from chronic illness.

What is Glutathione?

Glutathione is a very simple molecule that is produced naturally all the time in your body.  It is a combination of three simple building blocks of protein or amino acids — cysteine, glycine and glutamine.

The secret of its power is the sulfur (SH) chemical groups it contains.  Sulfur is a sticky, smelly molecule.  It acts like fly paper and all the bad things in the body stick onto it, including free radicals and toxins like mercury and other heavy metals.

Normally glutathione is recycled in the body — except when the toxic load becomes too great.  And that explains why we are in such trouble …

In my practice, I test the genes involved in glutathione metabolism. These are the genes involved in producing enzymes that allow the body to create and recycle glutathione in the body. These genes have many names, such as GSTM1, GSTP1 and more.

These genes impaired in some people for a variety of important reasons. We humans evolved in a time before the 80,000 toxic industrial chemicals found in our environment today were introduced into our world, before electromagnetic radiation was everywhere and before we polluted our skies, lakes, rivers, oceans and teeth with mercury and lead.

That is why most people survived with the basic version of the genetic detoxification software encoded in our DNA, which is mediocre at ridding the body of toxins.  At the time humans evolved we just didn’t need more. Who knew we would be poisoning ourselves and eating a processed, nutrient-depleted diet thousands of years later?

Because most of us didn’t require additional detoxification software, almost of half of the population now has a limited capacity to get rid of toxins. These people are missing GSTM1 function — one of the most important genes needed in the process of creating and recycling glutathione in the body.

Nearly all my very sick patients are missing this function. The one-third of our population that suffers from chronic disease is missing this essential gene. That includes me.  Twenty years ago I became mercury poisoned and suffered from chronic fatigue syndrome due to this very problem. My GSTM1 function was inadequate and I didn’t produce enough glutathione as a result. Eventually, my body broke down and I became extremely ill …

This is the same problem I see in so many of my patients. They are missing this critical gene and they descend into disease as a result. Let me explain how this happens …

The Importance of Glutathione in Protecting Against Chronic Illness

Glutathione is critical for one simple reason: It recycles antioxidants. You see, dealing with free radicals is like handing off a hot potato.  They get passed around from vitamin C to vitamin E to lipoic acid and then finally to glutathione which cools off the free radicals and recycles other antioxidants.  After this happens, the body can “reduce” or regenerate another protective glutathione molecule and we are back in business.

However, problems occur when we are overwhelmed with too much oxidative stress or too many toxins.  Then the glutathione becomes depleted and we can no longer protect ourselves against free radicals, infections, or cancer and we can’t get rid of toxins. This leads to further sickness and soon we are in the downward spiral of chronic illness.

But that’s not all. Glutathione is also critical in helping your immune system do its job of fighting infections and preventing cancer.  That’s why studies show that it can help in the treatment of AIDS.(i)

Glutathione is also the most critical and integral part of your detoxification system.  All the toxins stick onto glutathione, which then carries them into the bile and the stool — and out of your body.

And lastly, it also helps us reach peak mental and physical function. Research has shown that raised glutathione levels decrease muscle damage, reduce recovery time, increase strength and endurance and shift metabolism from fat production to muscle development.

If you are sick or old or are just not in peak shape, you likely have glutathione deficiency.   In fact, the top British medical journal, the Lancet, found the highest glutathione levels in healthy young people, lower levels in healthy elderly, lower still in sick elderly and the lowest of all in the hospitalized elderly. (ii)

Keeping yourself healthy, boosting your performance, preventing disease and aging well depends on keeping your glutathione levels high. I’ll say it again … Glutathione is so important because it is responsible for keeping so many of the keys to UltraWellness optimized.

It is critical for immune function and controlling inflammation.  It is the master detoxifier and the body’s main antioxidant, protecting our cells and making our energy metabolism run well.

And the good news is that you can do many things to increase this natural and critical molecule in your body. You can eat glutathione-boosting foods. You can exercise. And you can take glutathione-boosting supplements. Let’s review more specifics about each.

9 Tips to Optimize your Glutathione Levels

These 9 tips will help you improve your glutathione levels, improve your health, optimize your performance and live a long, healthy life.

Eat Foods that Support Glutathione Production

1. Consume sulfur-rich foods. The main ones in the diet are garlic, onions and the cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, kale, collards, cabbage, cauliflower, watercress, etc.).

2. Try bioactive whey protein. This is great source of cysteine and the amino acid building blocks for glutathione synthesis.  As you know, I am not a big fan of dairy. But this is an exception — with a few warnings.  The whey protein MUST be bioactive and made from non-denatured proteins (“denaturing” refers to the breakdown of the normal protein structure).  Choose non-pasteurized and non-industrially produced milk that contains no pesticides, hormones, or antibiotics.  Immunocal is a prescription bioactive non-denatured whey protein that is even listed in the Physician’s Desk Reference.

Exercise for Your Way to More Glutathione

3. Exercise boosts your glutathione levels and thereby helps boost your immune system, improve detoxification and enhance your body’s own antioxidant defenses.  Start slow and build up to 30 minutes a day of vigorous aerobic exercise like walking or jogging, or play various sports.  Strength training for 20 minutes 3 times a week is also helpful.

Take Glutathione Supporting Supplements

One would think it would be easy just to take glutathione as a pill, but the body digests protein — so you wouldn’t get the benefits if you did it this way. However, the production and recycling of glutathione in the body requires many different nutrients and you CAN take these. Here are the main supplements that need to be taken consistently to boost glutathione.  Besides taking a multivitamin and fish oil, supporting my glutathione levels with these supplements is the most important thing I do every day for my personal health.

4. N-acetyl-cysteine. This has been used for years to help treat asthma and lung disease and to treat people with life-threatening liver failure from Tylenol overdose. In fact, I first learned about it in medical school while working in the emergency room.  It is even given to prevent kidney damage from dyes used during x-ray studies.
5. Alpha lipoic acid. This is a close second to glutathione in importance in our cells and is involved in energy production, blood sugar control, brain health and detoxification.  The body usually makes it, but given all the stresses we are under, we often become depleted.

6. Methylation nutrients (folate and vitamins B6 and B12). These are perhaps the most critical to keep the body producing glutathione.  Methylation and the production and recycling of glutathione are the two most important biochemical functions in your body.  Take folate (especially in the active form of 5 methyltetrahydrofolate), B6 (in active form of P5P) and B12 (in the active form of methylcobalamin).

7. Selenium. This important mineral helps the body recycle and produce more glutathione.
8. A family of antioxidants including vitamins C and E (in the form of mixed tocopherols), work together to recycle glutathione.

9. Milk thistle (silymarin) has long been used in liver disease and helps boost glutathione levels.

So use these nine tips and see how they work to help you optimzie your glutathione levels. When you do, you will take one more step to lifelong vibrant health.

Now I’d like to hear from you…

Had you ever heard of this important nutrient before?

Have you tried any of the advice in this article?

What effects have you noticed on your health?

Please leave your thoughts by adding a comment below.

To your good health,

Mark Hyman, M.D.

References

(i) De Rosa SC, Zaretsky MD, Dubs JG, Roederer M, Anderson M, Green A, Mitra D, Watanabe N, Nakamura H, Tjioe I, Deresinski SC, Moore WA, Ela SW, Parks D, Herzenberg LA, Herzenberg LA. N-acetylcysteine replenishes glutathione in HIV infection. Eur J Clin Invest. 2000 Oct;30(10):915-29

(ii) Nuttall S, Martin U, Sinclair A, Kendall M. 1998. Glutathione: in sickness and in health. The Lancet 351(9103):645-646

Mark Hyman, M.D.  practicing physician and founder of The UltraWellness Center is a pioneer in functional medicine.  Dr. Hyman is now sharing the 7 ways to tap into your body’s natural ability to heal itself. You can follow him on Twitter, connect with him on LinkedIn, watch his videos on Youtube and become a fan on Facebook.

Oxidative stress is well known to drive the onset of inflammation, increase angiogenesis, and promote the conversion of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts.The general mechanism of oxidative stress-induced inflammation is:

  1. Oxidative stress regulates signaling pathways such as PI3K/AKT or MAPK to activate NFκB or AP-1.
  2. Inflammatory target genes and proteins are therefore upregulated to cause inflammation.
  3. The inflammation leads to cardiovascular diseases, neurodegeneration, cancer, diabetes and obesity.

A recent study sheds light on how this inflammation might be controlled:

“We … show that the skull bone is permeable to small-molecular-weight compounds, and use this delivery route to modulate inflammation and therapeutically ameliorate brain injury through transcranial administration of the ROS scavenger, glutathione.”

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Glutathione, the body’s master antioxidant and detoxifier by Priya Shah

Glutathione, the body’s master antioxidant and detoxifier, is one of the 14 “Superfoods” listed in SuperFoods Rx : Fourteen Foods That Will Change Your Life, co-authored by Dr Steven Pratt.

Glutathione levels cannot be increased to a clinically beneficial extent by orally ingesting a single dose of glutathione. (1) This is because glutathione is manufactured inside the cell, from its precursor amino acids, glycine, glutamate and cystine.

Hence food sources or supplements that increase glutathione must either provide the precursors of glutathione, or enhance its production by some other means.

The manufacture of glutathione in cells is limited by the levels of its sulphur-containing precursor amino acid, cysteine.

Cysteine – as a free amino acid – is potentially toxic and is spontaneously catabolized or destroyed in the gastrointestinal tract and blood plasma. However, when it is present as a cysteine-cysteine dipeptide, called cystine, it is more stable than cysteine.

Consuming foods rich in sulphur-containing amino acids can help boost glutathione levels. Here are some food sources and dietary supplements that help boost glutathione levels naturally.

1. N-Acetyl-Cysteine (NAC)

It is derived from the amino acid L-Cysteine, and acts as a precursor of glutathione. NAC is quickly metabolized into glutathione once it enters the body. It has been proven in numerous scientific studies and clinical trials, to boost intracellular production of glutathione, and is approved by the FDA for treatment of accetaminophen overdose. Because of glutathione’s mucolytic action, NAC (brand name Mucomyst) is commonly used in the treatment of lung diseases like cystic fibrosis, bronchitis and asthma.

2. Milk Thistle, Silymarin

Milk thistle is a powerful antioxidant and supports the liver by preventing the depletion of glutathione. Silymarin is the active compound of milk thistle. It is a natural liver detoxifier and protects the liver from many industrial toxins such as carbon tetrachloride, and more common agents like alcohol.

3. Alpha Lipoic Acid

Made naturally in body cells as a by-product of energy release, ALA increases the levels of intra-cellular glutathione, and is a natural antioxidant with free radical scavenging abilities. It has the ability to regenerate oxidized antioxidants like Vitamin C and E and helps to make them more potent. ALA is also known for its ability to enhance glucose uptake and may help prevent the cellular damage accompanying the complications of diabetes. It also has a protective effect in the brain.

4. Natural Foods That Boost Glutathione Levels

Asparagus is a leading source of glutathione. Foods like broccoli (2), avocado and spinach are also known to boost glutathione levels. Raw eggs, garlic and fresh unprocessed meats contain high levels of sulphur-containing amino acids and help to maintain optimal glutathione levels.

5. Undenatured Whey Protein Isolate

Whey protein contains proteins like alpha-lactalbumin which is is rich in sulphur-containing amino acids. Heating or pasteurization destroys the delicate disulphide bonds that give these proteins their bioactivity. Undenatured whey protein is a non-heated product that preserves bioactive amino acids like cystine. It has been shown in numerous scientific studies and clinical trials to optimize glutathione levels.

6. Curcumin (Turmeric)

Treatment of brain cells called astrocytes, with the Indian curry spice, curcumin (turmeric) has been found to increase expression of the glutathione S-transferase and protect neurons exposed to oxidant stress. (3)

7. Balloon Flower Root

Changkil saponins (CKS) isolated from the roots of the Chinese herbal medicine, Platycodon grandiflorum A. DC (Campanulaceae), commonly called Balloon Flower Root or Jie Geng, have been found to increase intracellular glutathione (GSH) content and significantly reduce oxidative injury to liver cells, minimise cell death and lipid peroxidation. (4)

8. Selenium

Selenium is a co-factor for the enzyme glutathione peroxidase. Selenium supplements have become popular because some studies suggest they may play a role in decreasing the risk of certain cancers, and in how the immune system and the thyroid gland function. However, too much selenium can cause some toxic effects including gastrointestinal upset, brittle nails, hair loss and mild nerve damage.

Disclaimer: The information here is not provided by medical professionals and is not intended as a substitute for medical advice. Nutritional supplements, while usually benign, can produce adverse reactions in some people. As with prescribed drugs, long-term effects from supplements are often unknown. Pregnant women and children should not take supplements except after consultation with their healthcare provider. Never exceed the recommended dosage on the container. If you observe adverse effects stop taking the supplement immediately and contact your healthcare provider.

References:

1. The systemic availability of oral glutathione
Witschi A, Reddy S, Stofer B, Lauterburg BH. [Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 1992;43(6):667-9.]

2. Dietary approach to attenuate oxidative stress, hypertension, and inflammation in the cardiovascular system
Wu L, Ashraf MH, Facci M, Wang R, Paterson PG, Ferrie A, Juurlink BH. [Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2004 May 4;101(18):7094-9. Epub 2004 Apr 21.]

3. Can Curry Protect Against Alzheimer’s?
American Physiological Society (APS) Press release; 16-Apr-2004

4. Protective effect of saponins derived from roots of Platycodon grandiflorum on tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced oxidative hepatotoxicity
Lee KJ, Choi CY, Chung YC, Kim YS, Ryu SY, Roh SH, Jeong HG. [Toxicol Lett. 2004 Mar 7;147(3):271-82.]

Others

Melatonin: This is a hormone that naturally occurs in the brain. It is made by the pineal gland. It is a derivative of the amino acid L-tryptophan and the neurotransmitter serotonin.

There are some food sources for melatonin, including the tart montmorency cherry, oats, sweet corn, rice, bananas, tomatoes, flax seed, sunflower seeds, and several leaves, such as feverfew and St. John’s Wort.

Melatonin has other roles as well, including functioning as an antioxidant, and also to effectively raise glutathione levels.

There have been many studies done on this aspect of melatonin, but as of yet, the long term safety of melatonin has not been well established, and the effect varies from person to person. If taken as a supplement, this product should only be used in conjunction with your health care professional.

Glutamine: Glutamine is the most abundant free amino acids found in the body. It is useful in raising glutathione. One of the few amino acids that crosses the blood-brain barrier, it is normally plentiful in the diet today.

There are many functions of glutamine, including it’s role in metabolizing and maintaining lean muscle. It can also build up your immune system, play a role in anti-cancer therapy, boost brain function, and detoxify the body.

Glutamine supplies the body with glutamate, one of the three amino acids that raise glutathione, and it is the second most important component after cysteine. Glutamate is found in many plant and animal sources, but is easily destroyed by cooking.

It is also found in raw spinach, parsley, and raw meat, but with the health risks associated with the latter, is not recommended. Completely healthy individuals don’t need supplemental glutamine. Any serious use of this supplement for help in how to raise glutathione should be monitored by a health care professional.

Lipoic Acid: This is also commonly referred to as Alpha-Lipoic Acid. The roles of this substance are as an antioxidant, neutralizer of toxins and heavy metals, and recycler of other antioxidants like Vitamin C and Vitamin E. It occurs naturally in the body, and is also available on the shelves of health food stores. it can also be found in small amounts in foods like spinach and broccoli.

Lipoic Acid works by keeping glutathione in its reduced state. This is good, because in its reduced stated, glutathione can do its job as an antioxidant. So they have a partnership of sorts. One reason glutathione is called the Master Antioxidant is because it also helps to keep lipoic acid in it’s reduced state as well.

There is some research demonstrating that a lipoic acid supplement is best taken along with L-Carnitine for the best results in raising glutathione.

There are promising results with lipoic acid being demonstrated with medical studies. For some, there are short term side effects, and so more research is being done on this substance to see what other benefits it may have in addition to raising glutathione.

Silymarin: Silymarin is the substance extracted from the milk thistle plant. As such, at times, these terms are used interchangeably.

This has been used by herbalists for centuries to treat a variety of liver disorders, like cirrhosis or hepatitis. It seems to stimulate the growth and regeneration of injured liver cells. It can also act as a free radical scavenger, enhancing detoxification in the liver.

There are ongoing studies demonstrating silymarin’s effectiveness in raising glutathione levels. Recommended doses vary greatly, from 50- 500 mg a day. Toxic reactions can include gas, cramps, and diarrhea.

Since it may lower blood sugar, it should be used with caution by diabetics. Liver diseases, including auto immune liver disease, should always be treated with the assistance of a health care professional.

Raising levels of glutathione

Vitamin B1, B2: These are water soluble vitamins that help to maintain glutathione and its related enzymes in their active forms.

B1 or Thiamine is found in cereal grains, yeast, pork, brown rice, certain vegetables, and eggs. B2 or Riboflavin is also essential for glutathione production and energy metabolism. vitamins and minerals
B2 can be found in dairy products, leafy green vegetables, liver, legumes, and yeast. The current recommended daily dose of these vitamins is 10-50 mg/day for most people.

However, many health professionals feel this may be too low , and so the optimum may be up to 300 mg/day. Since they are water soluble, any excess is excreted from the body and so toxicity is not normally an issue.

Vitamin B6, B12: These too are water soluble vitamins. They play an important role in glutathione synthesis. B6 is crucial for the function of many amino acids and essential fatty acids. It also helps with glucose and lipid metabolism.

B12 helps to produce red blood cells, myelin, DNA, and other neurological tissues. For this reason, it plays a key role in the normal functioning of the brain and nervous system. B12 also helps to regenerate folate in the body.

Folic Acid: Also known as folate, helps with making DNA and transmission of nervous signals. It has also been shown to help with cardiovascular disease. Children and adults alike need folic acid to prevent anemia or iron deficiency.

For learning how to raise glutathione , folate helps to make sure available cysteine is converted into glutathione rather than homocysteine. Under normal circumstances the recommended dosage of B6 is 10-50 mg/day, B12 is 10-50 mcg, Folic acid of 400 mcg per day.

Vitamin C: Also known as ascorbic acid, this is probably the best known water soluble vitamin. Most living organisms can make their own Vitamin C, but humans cannot, so it must be supplemented.
Vitamin C has been the subject of medical studies regarding it’s role as an antioxidant for many years now. Vitamin C has a key role in glutathione metabolism. It is involved in the glutathione enzyme system which keeps Vitamin C, Vitamin E, and other antioxidants in their reduced state.

This preserves their ability to keep on working as antioxidants in the body, effectively recycling them and making them work over and over again before being disposed of by the body.

There have been many studies showing that Vitamin C supports and raises glutathione levels and activity. By the same token, when there is not enough glutathione, Vitamin C is far less effective and rapidly depleted.

So we can see why they go hand in hand with one another. There is much controversy over the adequate dose of Vitamin C needed . If glutathione levels are adequate, than 200-1,000 mg/day should be sufficient.

Vitamin E: This is a fat-soluble vitamin that comes in a close second as the most popular supplement in America today. Besides its role as an antioxidant, Vitamin E has been shown to be helpful in many areas of disease prevention today. It also plays a role in detoxification.

It also plays an important role in the glutathione enzyme system which, like Vitamin C , keeps the other antioxidants in their reduced state so they can keep doing their job mopping up free radicals.

There are two forms of Vitamin E, natural and synthetic. The natural form is denoted by d, as in d-alpha tocopherol, and the synthetic form as dl, as in dl-alpha tocopherol. The natural forms are better for you. Vitamin E can be found in avocado, nuts, seeds, spinach, vegetable oils, wheat germ, milk, asparagus, and eggs.

The recommended daily dosage for Vitamin E ranges from 25-50 IU/day, although most of us would probably experience more benefit of higher doses of 100-1200IU/day. So Vitamin E can be very helpful in finding out how to raise glutathione in your cells.

If a person has adequate levels of glutathione, 400 IU/day should be sufficient. If excessively consumed, it can provoke gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and neurological side-effects, so caution should be exercised.

How To Raise Glutathione With Other Micronutrients: Magnesium, Vanadium, and Zinc:

Magnesium deficiency can lead to the impairment of an important glutathione enzyme needed for glutathione production.

Vanadium is a trace element that depends on glutathione to remain in a reduced state to increase it’s bioavailabiity. In high doses, Vanadium is toxic and may have an adverse effect on glutathione production.

Zinc deficiency also reduces glutathione concentration, especially in red blood cells. Zinc also is toxic in higher levels, and may also reduce glutathione if it is over-consumed.

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Wanted Sports Nutrition independent reps or Ambassador at USA, Sweden and Australia at http://gogyv.com/cdellobuono/

Have your own site for free before end of August and invest in your health monthly for a favorite anti-aging supplements of athletes powered by Biogenesis. Email Connie ->  motherhealth@gmail.com or text 408-854-1883 for more info for your sports nutrition business online