Happy genes love to eat

 Special people with special genes are always happy and love to eat. We are also influence by our environment but our genes is our master control until we harmed our genes from forces in the environment, prenatal nutrition , stress and other factors.

Connie

Top health topics on aging and health hacks 3-20-2018

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Eggplant and apple cider vinegar for skin cancer
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Signs of the preactive/ active phase of dying and medications for terminally ill
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Apple cider vinegar kills parasites, cleansing to the liver and prevents stroke
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Philippines Coconut Wine -Tuba
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DMSO, hydrogen peroxide and Vit C fight cancer cells
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Nitric Oxide Dump Exercise with nose breathing to lower blood pressure and thin blood
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Home page / Archives
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MEDICATIONS TO AVOID that worse PD (Parkinson’s disease)
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Can Gout be cured permanently?
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Non pasteurized beers have more health benefits
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Answers to your health questions from science and cultural healing ways
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Iron and sweet wormwood herb kill breast cancer cells in 16hrs
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Fatigue and Red (bloodshot) eyes from WebMD
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Vagus nerve stimulation thru breathing, laughs and yoga
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Can balsamic vinegar help with gout?
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Fungus on tobacco, wheat and other plants
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Anti-aging and Parkinson/Alzheimer’s prevention: Enzymes and apple cider vinegar
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What’s a good analogy to explain the immune system?
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Soluble fiber encapsulates bad fats and sugar out of your body
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Sovaldi , for Hepatitis C, is $483 in India and $84,000 in the USA
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Increase the body’s oxygen carrying capacity with exercise, EPO and whole foods
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Ultrasound kills bacteria , frequency and music killing cancer cells
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Detox your lungs from air pollution and metal toxins and for early lung cancer
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Iodine prevents cancer growth; up avocado and reduce caffeine intake to prevent Thyroid cancer
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Healthcare C-suite lacks diversity
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16 Tips On How To Treat HPV Naturally And Effectively At Home
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Parasites and their effects on your immune system
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Dopamine pathways and Parkinson
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Parkinson and Exercises
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Iron and sweet wormwood herb kill breast cancer cells in 16hrs
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Lung cancer in the Philippines
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When will Souvenaid become available in Canada and US to treat Alzheimer’s Disease?
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Good fats, SCFA – short chain fatty acids
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Stop aging of your face with DIY Vitamin C serum by wellnessmama
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Anabolic and catabolic process, hormones and exercise
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What could cause an low basophil count?
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24-hr lip stain for powerful lips
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Menu for the healthy plus kitchen tips
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More nitrate-reducing bacteria in saliva causes Migraine
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Your complete DNA sequence will help shape the future of medicine
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Restore your vision naturally y Dr. Mercola
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Gout, Dementia, Chelation Therapy
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Boron fights radiation by Dr Mercola
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Vitamin B and Pineapple for nerve damage by Dr E. Kane
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How many hours does it take normally for the stomach to empty totally after a good meal. Is it a good eating habit not to eat during this…
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Shingles Natural Treatments
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How quickly do different cells in the body replace themselves?
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What are the benefits of eating chicken soup during pregnancy?
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Neck pain and MTHFR gene , folate , methionine
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Nitric Oxide for strong blood vessels’ cells , up with exercise, melons, cucumber, Vit C, E, amino acid – L-arginine, L-citrulline
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Roman Coriander, Fennel flower or Black Cumin Seed Oil as an anti-tumor, anti-gastritis and anti-convulsant oil
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Slimy veggies, saluyot and okra fight cancer
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Alcohol, virus, sugar and fats lead to fatty liver
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Lung cancer and heavy metal toxins
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Hair Loss/Weight Loss, herbs for allergies, drug side-effects, herbs with caution, chemo Q&A
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Grow the Feeling and the Essence of Argentine Tango
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Anti-aging Vitamin B3, Niacin
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Dr Mercola’s book – Fat for Fuel
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Yoga and behavioral memory interventions for the aging brain
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Paul Ryan and Mitch McConnell implicated in Russia-Trump
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Link between liver disease and heart problems
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Levenson Self-Report Psychopathy Scale, a test of sociopathy
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Best health topics on How To and tips about our health
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Countdown to April 14 March for Science
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Mike Pence involvement in Russia scandal
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Association of Coffee Consumption With Total and Cause-Specific Mortality Among Nonwhite Populations
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Stephen Colbert Monologue | 8/3/2017 The F.B.I.’s Trump-Russia Investigation
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Metabolism Myths
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Carbon monoxide poisoning and Dementia
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5x more antioxidants in Okinawan diet of sweet potatoes and low calorie diet
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Prevention mag: Alzheimer’s disease
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Narrative Medicine
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NAC, activated charcoal , sleep and parasites
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Calcium, magnesium, Vitamin D3 and K2 and Omega-3s cut risk of cancer
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Australia has announced the new skilled occupation list for the immigration 2018
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Stroke Recovery Improved by Sensory Deprivation
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MIND Diet
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Inflammation Linked to Chemo Brain
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New York Times Opinions 3-15-2018
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Washington Post opinions 3-15-2018
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Leg cramps, heart muscles, magnesium and CQ10

Solving other people’s problems

My son would listen to his friends complain about life and he tells them how fortunate they are in what they have.

My daughter also listens to her friends, sad and depressed and put a smile in their face.

We need to have the time to listen to others. Those who only needs a different perspectives without needing to consult a doctor or pay for medications.

Problems can be solved in many ways.

We listen.

Email Connie at motherhealth@gmail.com for a different perspectives in your current problem. Sometimes, the focus is just in front of us. Do extend your reach and imagination.

Life is colorful because of the many challenges.

Do not think too much before going to bed.

Your problem can wait for  tomorrow or you can write down your thoughts before you sleep.

We solve one small chunk of our problem each day until we fully solve them with some help.

Help is around you.

 

EMF and Diabetes

During the last 3 Sundays, I have been jogging and walking bare feet in Santa Cruz beach, California. I believe in nature’s help in grounding, releasing negative charges in our bodies. Email motherhealth@gmail.com if you have any research related to EMF, Diabetes and other health issues to find the root cause and empower others to a healthy body.

Connie

Dr. Magda Havas, PhD » Diabetes and Electrosensitivity

March 2010. If you have difficulty regulating your blood sugar and you are electrically sensitive you may have type 3 diabetes according to research published in the Journal Electromagnetic Biology and Medicine in 2008. Unlike Type 1 diabetes (juvenile diabetes) that is largely genetically controlled, and Type 2 diabetes …

Diabetes and EMFs | Cause of Diabetes | Type 3 Diabetes – EarthCalm

exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMFs). … Dr. Havas’s study concludes that many diabetics may be electrically-sensitive, a condition which may cause increased blood sugar in their tests. … No matter what type of Diabetes you have, you will benefit from EMF protection.

Could EMFs Cause Diabetes? – ElectricSense

Jan 13, 2011 – Studies show that diabetes can be triggered by exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMFs). It causes Type 3 diabetes. Learn the principal causes and solutions.

[PDF]Diabetes and ElectroMagnetic Fields: the evidence – Next-up

a connection between the increase in diabetes and EMF exposure, but also the effectiveness of filters on ELF electrical equipment that help to reduce the suffering and the symptoms of diabetics. “We can take a diabetic person and put them in an environment polluted by EMR and measure their sugar levels,” she explained …

Electromagnetic Fields Can Worsen Diabetes – Real Diabetes Truth …

Aug 29, 2013 – There is mounting evidence that electromagnetic fields (EMF) from the electronic equipment that constantly surrounds us are bad for our health.

EMF and Diabetes | eatgenius

eatgenius.com › Bites

Mar 17, 2017 – EMF is a risk factor for diabetes and affects diabetes management.

DoH: EMF and Diabetes / Cell Phone Radiation Standards – Institute …

geopathology-za.wikidot.com › … › Department of Health

Please WAKE-UP !!! Minister of Health and Minister of Environment !!! – Please WAKE-UP, now !!!**. Electromagnetic Fields lead to Diabetic Disasters – and not only THAT !!! See: http://www.naturalnews.com/029328_diabetes_electromagnetic_pollution.html. Talking about certain PROBLEMS does not help much, unless you …

EMF / EMR and type 3 Diabetes | Life Energy Designs

Diabetes can be caused by EMF / EMR exposure. This is the conclusion of the latest peer-reviewed research by Dr. Magda Havas PhD. In sensitive people, which she classifies as having type 3 diabetesor environmentally triggered diabetes, exposure to dirty electricity (EMF/EMR) is enough to send their blood sugar high.

Dirty electricity elevates blood sugar among electrically sensitive …

by M Havas – ‎2008 – ‎Cited by 54 – ‎Related articles

Electromagn Biol Med. 2008;27(2):135-46. doi: 10.1080/15368370802072075. Dirty electricity elevates blood sugar among electrically sensitive diabetics and may explain brittle diabetes. Havas M(1). Author information: (1)Environmental & Resource Studies, Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario, Canada.

Electromagnetic Fields Lead to Diabetic Disasters – NaturalNews.com

Jul 31, 2010 – (NewsTarget) In recent years, many of us have grown increasingly aware of the possible dangers posed by Electromagnetic Fields (EMFs) [1]. As electrical and wireless applications continue to become more ubiquitous in society, so our exposure to EMFs continues to climb. Although low levels of natural …

Brain, salt, sugar, sleep and thirst

Last night, I put a little salt on my tongue before going to bed and controlled by sugar cravings. I slept well. The part of our brain that craves for sugar , also craves for salty food.
Connie

SYNTHETIC STIMULANTS CALLED BATH SALTS ACT IN THE BRAIN LIKE COCAINE

Results of a new study offer compelling evidence for the first time that mephedrone, like cocaine, does have potential for abuse and addiction. “The effects of mephedrone on the brain’s reward circuits are comparable to similar doses of cocaine,” Dr. Malanga, a professor of neurology, pediatrics and psychology at UNC School of Medicine said. “As expected our research shows that mephedrone likely has significant abuse liability.” READ MORE…

Salt and protein to sleep and blame ‘Food Coma’ on the brain

I consumed Trader Joe’s chocolate cake for 4 servings last night with 28 grams of sugar which woke me up from 12 midnight to 3 am. Salt and protein has an effect on the brain to go back to sleep as described in this fruit fly study and one author’s regimen of combo of salt and sugar under the tongue. Caffeine in chocolate is negligible to have an effect but might have stronger effect on others.

Connie

In the book Eat for Heat, researcher Matt Stone describes this trick we mentioned above as a solution to help you sleep better.

“The mix of salt and sugar is absolutely necessary for stressful situations during the night. When insomnia occurs between 2 am and 4 am accompanied by a feeling of excess adrenaline flowing through your body (adrenaline spikes during this time), salt and sugar under the tongue is the only way forward.”

Blame ‘Food Coma’ On The Brain

Summary: Researchers investigate fruit fly brains to discover the connection between eating, sleep and activity.

Source: Bowling Green State University.

The humble fruit fly has proved to be a fruitful research subject for BGSU neuroscientist Dr. Robert Huber and colleagues from Scripps Research Institute in Florida and elsewhere. The collaborators’ research into their behavior has helped expand our understanding of some important neurobiological connections between eating and sleep — including the infamous “food coma” felt after a big meal.

The Scripps study was one of Huber’s projects as a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Studies at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., last year. As an expert in computational ethology, he uses computer technology to obtain meaningful numbers from complex systems — in this case, capturing and precisely recording the tiny Drosophilas’ behavior related to eating, activity levels and sleep.

The cause of the food coma turned out to be protein and salt, along with the time of day the food was consumed. Surprisingly, sugar did not seem to play a role, according to the study. The results of the experiments Huber conducted with lead researcher Dr. William Ja of Scripps and his team were reported in more than 200 newspapers around the world.

The scientists will now look more deeply at the brain structures that induce the insects to sleep after consuming protein and salt, and test theories about why sleep then would be beneficial.

“Clearly, protein is a very expensive commodity,” Huber said. “If sleep increases your ability to resorb it, that would be a possible reason. And the same thing with salt.” Carbohydrates, on the other hand, are much easier to come by in nature, he said, so might not call for such dedicated digestion.

The fruit flies’ preference for protein does explain their attraction to overripe fruit, where they can lay their eggs.

“The flies have very good sensory receptors to detect all kinds of volatile compounds that indicate ripe fruit and yeast,” Huber said.

Huber’s interest in computer ethology is tied to his fascination with the connection between genetics and behavior, first discovered and explored by the late molecular biologist Seymour Benzer, with whom Ja conducted postdoctoral research. Huber has also been working with other labs on projects utilizing video tracking and had an article in the journal PLoS One in 2012 about developing better technology to look at the activity patterns of fruit flies. His primary projects as a Radcliffe fellow are with Dr. Ed Kravitz of Harvard Medical School, examining addiction and aggression in Drosophila.

A shared interest in behavioral genetics is what also drew Huber to the Ja team’s work.

“Ja has always been interested in the connection between behavior and genetics,” Huber said. “And their lab is just phenomenal. The real advantage of the fruit flies is you have such exquisite control over all the different bits of their genes and there’s so much you can do with them.

“You can express a certain gene in a certain subtype of neurons. Mushroom bodies (a pair of brain structures having to do with learning and memory) have dopaminergic neurons only to do with short-term memory and others for long-term memory. You can put those specific neurons under the control of optigenetics by expressing a membrane channel, related to a photoreceptor. So when you shine a red light onto the fly’s head it opens up channels which specifically activate the entire subset of neurons for long-term memory, for instance. There’s no other model system where you can gain that level of control.”

Huber’s expertise with video tracking and applying computer vision to monitor and measure the tiny flies’ behavior allowed the researchers to collect much more reliable data “than having an observer there with a clipboard, writing a summary of what happens,” he said. “Instead, we apply computer technology with strict rules to objectively remove observer bias. Behavior is a very complex type of trait or phenotype, so it’s not as simple as measuring the height of something. We use computer technology with video tracking, integrating it with sensors and robotic interfaces. We can create automated learning paradigms in real time.”

Thus, a system devised by Huber senses when a fruit fly alights on a tiny platform and reaches up to eat from a tube. The computer measures exactly the number and duration of instances of feeding along with a record of the fly’s activity levels, including those that denote sleep.

“We can really improve our characterization of food consumption and activity,” Huber said. “In one second, we can get a thousand data points, very accurately, showing when, how much, how often they feed. That’s not something you are able to do by hand.”

During the food coma, the flies remain still for a certain amount of time and they are much less responsive to any kind of other cues than they would normally be, he said.

“There’s clearly something very potent about sleep itself,” Huber said. Using genetic manipulation techniques, the team will look at whether a neuron with a receptor for a neuropeptide called leucokinin is actually playing a role in causing the flies to fall asleep specifically after consuming protein and salt.

“You can turn those receptors on and off with molecular genetics and piece together how the whole network that controls sleep is put together,” Huber said.

This should help reveal more about the mechanics of sleeping and eating. Using a tiny but extremely powerful LED light, he is able to trigger responses in the genetically modified flies. When the light is not activated, the insects behave just like any other normal fruit fly.

Huber is also eager to explore the potential of the video tracking technology for “tying together metabolic physiology and how much animals eat, what they eat, and how they convert that into energy, and what that has to do with aging,” he said, noting that appetite and satiety, sleep patterns, aging and other functions are all controlled by neurosignals. Anything that interferes with one signal will affect something else. Another of his related projects is with Dr. Leslie Griffith at Brandeis University, regarding food choices, activity patterns and “clock genes.”

After spending several months observing the fruit flies up close, Huber said he has a new appreciation for them.

“They’re very intricate little ‘critters,’” he said. “I spent quite a few days at first just watching them, and their behavior is a lot more complex than what we might think. I did not appreciate them before going there.

a fruit fly.

“Flies are very good at learning,” he added. Additional research into those individuals who are not good at it has identified which genes are altered in these “behavioral mutants.” In collaboration with BGSU colleagues Drs. Moira van Staaden, biological sciences, and Jon Sprague, director of the Ohio Attorney General’s Center for the Future of Forensic Science, he plans to study the role these genes play as flies learn sensory cues paired with human drugs of abuse.

Following his return from Boston, Huber described his sabbatical as “phenomenal, I got to work with a whole group of scholars on so many interesting projects; it was so stimulating.” And having open access to “maker spaces” in Cambridge’s Central Square, halfway between Harvard and MIT, he created his very tiny electronic devices for improving precision — “I was like a kid in the candy store. I’m still very excited about it.”

The fruit flies have inspired not only scientific but also art projects. Huber is collaborating on a “fruit fly soundscape” that arose from his new friendship with Radcliffe fellow Reiko Yamada. A sound artist, classical pianist, experimental composer and now artist in residence at the Institute for Electronic and Acoustic Music at the University of Music and Performing Arts in Graz, Austria, Yamada was “really mesmerized by the difference in scale we live in between the fruit flies and humans,” Huber said. Their interactive soundscape will debut at the IEM Cube at the end of March.

In addition, Huber is collaborating with his former adviser Dr. Kent Rylander, now turned jazz musician since his retirement from Texas Tech University 15 years ago. Huber and Rylander are pursuing a project on the aesthetics, compositional patterns and improvisation of birdsong.

ABOUT THIS NEUROSCIENCE RESEARCH ARTICLE

Source: Bowling Green State University 
Image Source: NeuroscienceNews.com image is credited to Mr.checker and is licensed CC BY SA 3.0.
Original Research: Full open access research for “Postprandial sleep mechanics in Drosophila” by Keith R Murphy, Sonali A Deshpande, Maria E Yurgel, James P Quinn, Jennifer L Weissbach, Alex C Keene, Ken Dawson-Scully, Robert Huber, Seth M Tomchik, and William W Ja in eLife. Published online November 22 2016 doi:10.7554/eLife.19334

CITE THIS NEUROSCIENCENEWS.COM ARTICLE
Bowling Green State University “Blame ‘Food Coma’ On The Brain.” NeuroscienceNews. NeuroscienceNews, 9 January 2017.
<http://neurosciencenews.com/food-coma-neuroscience-5899/&gt;.

Abstract

Postprandial sleep mechanics in Drosophila

Food consumption is thought to induce sleepiness. However, little is known about how postprandial sleep is regulated. Here, we simultaneously measured sleep and food intake of individual flies and found a transient rise in sleep following meals. Depending on the amount consumed, the effect ranged from slightly arousing to strongly sleep inducing. Postprandial sleep was positively correlated with ingested volume, protein, and salt—but not sucrose—revealing meal property-specific regulation. Silencing of leucokinin receptor (Lkr) neurons specifically reduced sleep induced by protein consumption. Thermogenetic stimulation of leucokinin (Lk) neurons decreased whereas Lk downregulation by RNAi increased postprandial sleep, suggestive of an inhibitory connection in the Lk-Lkr circuit. We further identified a subset of non-leucokininergic cells proximal to Lkr neurons that rhythmically increased postprandial sleep when silenced, suggesting that these cells are cyclically gated inhibitory inputs to Lkr neurons. Together, these findings reveal the dynamic nature of postprandial sleep.

“Postprandial sleep mechanics in Drosophila” by Keith R Murphy, Sonali A Deshpande, Maria E Yurgel, James P Quinn, Jennifer L Weissbach, Alex C Keene, Ken Dawson-Scully, Robert Huber, Seth M Tomchik, and William W Ja in eLife. Published online November 22 2016 doi:10.7554/eLife.19334

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